Events/News

Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 - 12th AnnualMay 19, 2017, 1:00pmSan Mateo County Event CenterMaker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It’s a place where people of all ages and backgrounds gather together to show what they are making, and share what they are learning.

Maker Faire Bay Area - 12th Annual
May 19-21
FRIDAY@MakerFaire: 1pm - 5pm special access preview day

Saturday (10AM-7PM) and Sunday (10AM -6PM)
San Mateo Event Center, San Mateo, CA

Call for Makers is taking applications NOW
makerfaire.com/bay-area/call-for-makers/

Tickets for Maker Faire Bay Area will go be on sale shortly - sign up for the Faire newsletter to be notified. Don't miss Early Bird prices (best deal rates!)
makerfaire.com/newsletter/

Maker Faire celebrated 191+ Faires in 2016 in 38 Countries. The 11th annual Maker Faire Bay Area welcomed some 1,200 makers and 145,000 attendees. World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in seven years to 950+ makers and 95,000 attendees.
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Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 - 12th Annual

3 months ago

Quora Design Tech Talk: Social Systems DesignMarch 21, 2017, 6:30pmJacobs Institute for Design Innovation~ Social Systems Design and the Nature of Knowledge ~

Come hear Quora Product Design Manager Mills Baker discuss the socially-mediated nature of human knowledge. Learn what this means for scaled information systems and civil society in the era of fake news, filter bubbles, social networks like Twitter or Facebook, and conversational experiences like Siri and Google Home.

——

*RESUMES WILL BE ACCEPTED*

This will also be an opportunity to meet and network with the design team at Quora!

The event will be held at 220 Jacobs Hall, from 6:30 to 8 PM on March 21st. There will also be food and refreshments provided at the event!
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Quora Design Tech Talk: Social Systems Design

3 months ago

ArchDaily

ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwide

The original home was a modest one story over garage, two bedroom, one bath home in the Noe Valley neighborhood of San Francisco. Similar to other homes in San Francisco, when built, a handful of other very similar homes were constructed adjacent to it, each slightly different than the next. 

© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse
  • Architects: designpad architecture
  • Location: 27th St, San Francisco, CA 94131, United States
  • Architect In Charge: Patrick Perez
  • Area: 3046.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Adam Rouse
  • Construction: Brad Doran
  • Interior Design: Melissa Winn
  • Professional Engineers: Enertia Design
© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse

From the architect. The original home was a modest one story over garage, two bedroom, one bath home in the Noe Valley neighborhood of San Francisco. Similar to other homes in San Francisco, when built, a handful of other very similar homes were constructed adjacent to it, each slightly different than the next. 

© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse

Our clients are a young family who at the start of the project had one toddler and towards the end another. Their dream for the home was to modernize and expand the space to allow for a growing family. Connecting to the rear yard and expanding vertically to capture the downtown views were vital as were an open floor that was flooded with light.

© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse
1st / 2nd Level Plans 1st / 2nd Level Plans
© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse
Roof Plan Roof Plan

At the ground floor the rear was dug out and expanded to allow for a living space and home office. At the main floor the space was gutted and expanded out with a new rear yard roof deck and an open floor plan. And at the new third story, a master suite and roof deck with city views was designed along with two bedrooms and a new bath.

© Adam Rouse © Adam Rouse
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: June 23, 2017, 5:00 pm

Cornell University's College of Architecture, Art and Planning has unveiled a 12-piece versatile furniture series designed for the school's New York City space in Manhattan's financial district. Created by Hong Kong-based architecture office CL3 and interdisciplinary design studio Lim + Lu (founding partners of which are Cornell alumni), each piece has been inspired both by their New York context and intuitive operation by a global user.

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

Cornell University's College of Architecture, Art and Planning has unveiled a 12-piece versatile furniture series designed for the school's New York City space in Manhattan's financial district. Created by Hong Kong-based architecture office CL3 and interdisciplinary design studio Lim + Lu (founding partners of which are Cornell alumni), each piece has been inspired both by their New York context and intuitive operation by a global user.

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

Description from the Architects
Founder of CL3, William Lim, as well as both founding partners of Lim+Lu, Vincent Lim and Elaine Lu, are alumni of Cornell University's College of Architecture, Art and Planning. The two design studios were invited to design pieces specifically for Cornell University's space located in the financial district in Manhattan. When engaged by the Dean of the college for this project, the three thought it would be a great way to give back to their alma mater.

Lim + Lu noted that the pushcart is uniquely New York and has become an ubiquitous part of the city's landscape. At every turn and corner, the pushcarts are transporting goods in, out, and around the city. Although it is inherently New York, the pushcart represents matters at a larger scale — globalisation.

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland
© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

The design journey began by examining the inherent qualities of these pushcarts and how they are used on a daily basis. They are sometimes used in an upright manner and at other times adopt a more reclined position. This bipolar characteristic of the pushcart presented the opportunity to design a furniture series that could also have multiple personalities. For example, a piece that functions as a three-seater sofa in its reclined position may transform into a coat rack when it's upright. When a piece is in one posture, one can notice subtle hints that it can be used in another stance. This exploration resulted in 12 pieces of multi-purpose portable furniture.

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

Due to the bespoke nature of these furniture pieces, its context was crucial to the success of the project. William Lim of CL3 commented: "We always like to approach our designs within context. Our practice is rooted in the principles of Asian design. We blend an intuitive sense of light, balance and proportion with contemporary solutions and innovative materials to produce design that are versatile. That's what we have done with this range: we have thought about the true purpose of the furniture. How it will become part of Cornell's fabric, go beyond the primary usage, and spread out within the context it has been placed within."

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

Vincent Lim of Lim + Lu added This has been a fun journey. As alumni we have been peering back into our old school and thought what could we give back. Thinking back to our time as students and how we used the spaces around Cornell, to come together to share ideas. These have a nice function and form element to them, also to apply the Cornell crest to the structure adds a nice sense of pride. Unveiling these in May is a great time to coincide with the 29th annual ICFF platform for global design, where we also have a booth showing our other designs.

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

Kent Kleinman, Gale and Ira Drukier Dean of Cornell AAP commented: "Each piece is a hybrid; a modular urban element that functions as a kind of infrastructure, mated to a customized artifact specific to particular program. Taken together, they are a microcosm of Cornell's famous lessons in college urbanism.”

Design Type: Product Design
Designer: William Lim, Vincent Lim, Elaine Lu,
Design Company: CL3, Lim + Lu 
Design Time: 2017.05
Material: Powder Coated Stainless Steel, Vinyl Upholstery
Photographer: NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland

© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland © NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland
Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: June 23, 2017, 4:00 pm

OCAD’s Steam Canoe was inspired by the canoe; The vessel that symbolizes the rich history of the indigenous first nations and early exploration of North America. The shoreline shelter was built to cut through the harsh wind of the cold winter shoreline, reflecting the interior space created by overturned water vessels. Solar hydronic components were installed within the structure, reflecting the underlying theme of freeze-thaw. Evacuated solar tubes heated a capture pan at the rear of the interior, melting snow and generating warm water, creating a fog halo that emerged from within the structure.

© Mark Tholen © Mark Tholen
  • Other Participants: Jaewon Kim, Jungyun Lee, Monifa Onca Charles, Reila Park, Hamid Shahi, Lambert St-Cyr, Jason Wong, Sanjana Chokshi, Aruvi Rajasingham, Supreetha Guntur, Rachel Sau, Nancy Le, Olayide Madamidola, Alejandro Rebollar Heres, Albert Bachli
© Khristel Stecher © Khristel Stecher

From the architect. OCAD’s Steam Canoe was inspired by the canoe; The vessel that symbolizes the rich history of the indigenous first nations and early exploration of North America. The shoreline shelter was built to cut through the harsh wind of the cold winter shoreline, reflecting the interior space created by overturned water vessels. Solar hydronic components were installed within the structure, reflecting the underlying theme of freeze-thaw. Evacuated solar tubes heated a capture pan at the rear of the interior, melting snow and generating warm water, creating a fog halo that emerged from within the structure.

Canoe Parts Diagram Canoe Parts Diagram

The Steam Canoe structure was achieved with a combination of computer assisted parametric geometry, manual cutting of the computer generated forms and innovative experimental production combining the traditional process of rolling Press Laminated Timber Panels with a new mechanical fastening technology called GRIP Metal, a type of “metal velcro,” applied in the form of continuous thin-gauge sheet metal layers, with grip hooks on both faces of the sheet.

© Curtis Ho © Curtis Ho

GRIP Metal simplified the process of sandwiching two layers of 1/8 “Oak and one layer of 3/4" Spruce, eliminating the adhesives typically used for laminate panels. This continuous steel sheet is pressed into the veneer and core lumber in this simple press rolling method. The results are strong and lightweight panels allowing an assembly into a pavilion without need for substructure, the external skin is the structure.

© Khristel Stecher © Khristel Stecher
Building Detail and Elevations Building Detail and Elevations
© Khristel Stecher © Khristel Stecher
Timber Panels Diagram Timber Panels Diagram
© Khristel Stecher © Khristel Stecher

Different radii are made possible by adjusting the feeding angle of the assembled panels carefully into the roll press. The panels have a stronger bond than traditional chemical adhesive methods; the components can be separated at the end of their lifetime into pure material origins of wood and metal, making this a perfect innovation in material, process, application, product and sustainability.

Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: June 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

Construction has begun on the Liuzhou Forest City in the mountainous region of Guangxi, China. Designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti, the new ground-up city will accommodate up to 30,000 people in a master plan of environmentally efficient structures covered top-to-bottom in plants and trees.

© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti

Construction has begun on the Liuzhou Forest City in the mountainous region of Guangxi, China. Designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti, the new ground-up city will accommodate up to 30,000 people in a master plan of environmentally efficient structures covered top-to-bottom in plants and trees.

Liuzhou Forest City will contain all of the essential typologies of the modern city – offices, houses, hotels, hospitals and schools – housed within a 175 hectare site near the Liujiang River. Employing the firm’s signature vertical forest system, The facades of each building will be covered in plant life, with a total 40,000 trees and nearly 1 million plants from over 100 species specified.

© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti

This implementation of greenery will benefit both residents and the environment, acting as passive cooling systems for interior spaces, noise barriers to shield the city from the nearby highway and a micro-habitat supporting the region’s lush biodiversity of organisms including plants, birds, insects and small animals. The system will also improve the air quality of the area, as it is estimated to absorb 10,000 tons of CO2 and 57 tons of pollutants per year, in turn producing approximately 900 tons of oxygen.

© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti
© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti

In addition to the benefits of the planted facades, each building has been designed for energy self-sufficiency, with geothermal systems providing interior air conditions and rooftop solar panels offering a renewable energy source. Transportation to downtown Liuzhou will also utilize efficiency means, including a high-speed rail line and electric vehicles.

© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti
© Stefano Boeri Architetti © Stefano Boeri Architetti

The forest city concept builds upon the firm’s vertical forest research, which has resulted in the world’s first completed vertical forest tower in Milan, as well as plans for several other iterations of the system throughout the world including the Chinese cities of Nanjing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

With construction on Liuzhou Forest City now underway, the project is expected to be realized in just 3 years, with an anticipated opening in 2020.

News via Stefano Boeri Architetti.

  • Architects: Stefano Boeri Architetti
  • Location: Liuzhou, Guangxi, China
  • Partners: Stefano Boeri, Yibo Xu
  • Project Leader: Pietro Chiodi
  • Team Architects: Julia Gocalek, Yinxin Bao, Shilong Tan with Giulia Chiatante
  • Cooperative Design Institute In China: Shanghai Tongyan Architectural and Planning Design Co. Ltd.
  • Client: Liuzhou Municipality Urban Planning Bureau
  • Area: 1385000.0 m2
  • Photographs: Stefano Boeri Architetti

Tirana 2030: Watch How Nature and Urbanism Will Co-Exist in the Albanian Capital

In 1925, Italian designer Armando Brasini created a sweeping masterplan to transform the Albanian capital city of Tirana. Almost one hundred years later, the Tirana 2030 (TR030) Local Plan by Italian firm Stefano Boeri Architetti has been approved by Tirana City Council.

Stefano Boeri Architetti Unveils Plans for Vertical Forest Towers in Nanjing

Stefano Boeri Architetti has released plans for their first "Vertical Forest" project to be realized in Asia, two mixed-use towers to be located near the Yangtze River in the Pukou District of Nanjing, China. In total, over 1100 trees will cover the building, helping to regenerate local biodiversity while cleaning the air.

Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: June 23, 2017, 2:00 pm

San Francisco’s Tenderloin is the City’s densest neighborhood, and most of its residents live below the poverty line in small apartments without access to back yards or green space. Re-built in 1985, Boeddeker Park never lived up to its potential as the neighborhood’s largest public park. Early attempts to address safety concerns resulted in a maze of fences and visibility across the space was poor. Neighbors called it “Prison Park.” In response, The Trust for Public Land, in partnership with the City of San Francisco, teamed with WRNS Studio to redesign and completely rebuild the one-acre park and clubhouse to meet the needs of the community.

© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman
  • Architects: WRNS Studio
  • Location: Father Alfred E. Boeddeker Park, 246 Eddy St, San Francisco, CA 94102, United States
  • Architect In Charge: WRNS Studio
  • Area: 4000.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Matthew Milman
  • Structural Engineering: Daedalus
  • Engineering: Inc. Interface
  • Design Engineers: Sherwood
  • Landscape Architect: Trust for Public Land
© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman

From the architect. San Francisco’s Tenderloin is the City’s densest neighborhood, and most of its residents live below the poverty line in small apartments without access to back yards or green space. Re-built in 1985, Boeddeker Park never lived up to its potential as the neighborhood’s largest public park. Early attempts to address safety concerns resulted in a maze of fences and visibility across the space was poor. Neighbors called it “Prison Park.” In response, The Trust for Public Land, in partnership with the City of San Francisco, teamed with WRNS Studio to redesign and completely rebuild the one-acre park and clubhouse to meet the needs of the community.

© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman
Site Plan Site Plan
© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman

Together, The Trust for Public Land and WRNS conducted extensive community outreach, holding public meetings and forums at the site as well as at nearby youth centers, senior centers and churches—wherever local people were likely to come. Key decisions were made at these forums. The result is a new landmark park and clubhouse that serves as a model of civic engagement, inspiration, resource conservation and adaptability. The clubhouse was conceived as an inviting living room for the neighborhood. Its geometries and language are derived from integration with the park and a respectful contrast to the surrounding neighborhood fabric. This building extends both the tradition of San Francisco clubhouse design and the history of delightful contrast found in Tenderloin architecture.

© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman

Organized around two flexible gathering spaces, the clubhouse’s main recreation room fronts Eddy Street and frames the main park entry on the street. The form of the room reaches to the sky for light and volume and bends into the park to strengthen the feeling of “park pavilion”. This room opens to the main entry plaza. The recreation room is transparent, making interior activities evident to both the neighborhood and park. Addressing the community’s need for open space that supports a wide age-range of patrons, park amenities include different areas supporting adult exercise, basketball, youth play structures, and socializing and gathering.

Elevation / Section Elevation / Section

Boeddeker Park is one of the first participants in the Sustainable Sites Initiative, an interdisciplinary effort led by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center and the United States Botanic Garden to create voluntary national guidelines and performance benchmarks for sustainable land design, construction, and maintenance practices. 

© Matthew Milman © Matthew Milman
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: June 23, 2017, 1:00 pm

Following the opening of the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed this year by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Designed to mimic a tree, or a canopy of trees, the wooden structure has been designed to fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso with more "experimental" construction techniques. His ambition is that the pavilion becomes a social condenser – "a symbol of storytelling and togetherness."

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed this year by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Designed to mimic a tree, or a canopy of trees, the wooden structure has been designed to fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso with more "experimental" construction techniques. His ambition is that the pavilion becomes a social condenser – "a symbol of storytelling and togetherness."

You can find out more about the design and development of the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, including its unique climatic features, here.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Diébédo Francis Kéré's Serpentine Pavilion Opens in Sun-Drenched London - But Will Come Alive During Rain

The 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré ( Kéré Architecture), was unveiled today in London. Conceived as a micro cosmos-"a community structure within Kensington Gardens"-the pavilion has been designed to consciously fuse cultural references from Kéré's home town of Gando in Burkino Faso, with "experimental construction techniques."

Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: June 23, 2017, 12:00 pm

Situated on the northern side of S.Miguel Island, the plot has an open view over the sorrounding fields and woods.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart
  • Architects: ARCO mais
  • Location: Rabo de Peixe, Açores, Portugal
  • Lead Architects: Paulo Lima, Chiara Bettelli
  • Area: 76.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Paulo Goulart
  • Engineering: Clife Braga, Paulo Bandarra
© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

From the architect. Situated on the northern side of S.Miguel Island, the plot has an open view over the sorrounding fields and woods.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

The client expressed a desire of openness and harmony with nature, and very little concerns about how he would like the interior of the house, except from the wish of including memories of old travels through some objects.

Floor Plan Floor Plan

The design keeps the action of building minimal, as aethereal as possible when working with concrete, shaping a simple frame and the border between inside and outside, giving it flexibility.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

So we designed and built a floating concrete box. The concrete frame does not touch the ground, and the living space is separated from the outside only through a set of sliding glass panels.

Cross Section Cross Section

In a plot sorrounded by high stone walls, the building is located next to the western end, with no relation with the street, becoming almost invisible from it.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

The tension created on the west side between wall and construction gives to the in-between space a sense of intimacy, enough to define it as a garden, in opposition to the rest of the plot.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

From the outside, the building materializes itself through light and shadows, its mass and presence appearing and desappearing with a change of wiewpoint or the mere passage of a cloud.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart

The interior space of the house, taken to the essential, develops into the sleeping area and the living, separated by a functional block including storage, kitchen and the restroom: a box inside the box.

Living room and bedroom find an extension on the ouside under the roof slab.

© Paulo Goulart © Paulo Goulart
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: June 23, 2017, 11:00 am

In the tenth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jorge Otero-Pailos (Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia GSAPP) speaks with Francine Houben, founder and creative director of the Dutch practice Mecanoo. Recorded before the school's annual Paul S. Byard Memorial Lecture, their conversation centers on her practice's work to renovate and redevelop the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington D.C., Mies van der Rohe's last building and only library project.

© GSAPP Conversations © GSAPP Conversations

In the tenth episode of GSAPP Conversations, Jorge Otero-Pailos (Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia GSAPP) speaks with Francine Houben, founder and creative director of the Dutch practice Mecanoo. Recorded before the school's annual Paul S. Byard Memorial Lecture, their conversation centers on her practice's work to renovate and redevelop the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington D.C., Mies van der Rohe's last building and only library project.

I felt two men on my shoulders. On the left side is Mies and on the right side is Martin Luther King, Jr. [...] I said Martin Luther King is more important to make the building more open, more welcoming. In a kind of very subtle way, I balanced Mies and Martin Luther King Jr. and, if it was conflicting, Martin Luther King Jr. won.

Fly Through Mecanoo's Final Designs for Washington D.C.'s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library

The District of Columbia Public Library authority has unveiled a fly-through video tour of the final design for the renovation and intervention of its main downtown branch, the Martin Luther King Jr. Public Library. According to the architects, Mecanoo and D.C.-based Martinez+Johnson Architecture, it shows "a modern library that reflects a focus on people, while celebrating the exchange of knowledge, ideas and culture."

GSAPP Conversations is a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice. Each episode pivots around discussions on current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests at Columbia, from both emerging and well-established practices. Usually hosted by the Dean of the GSAPP, Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the school’s influential faculty and alumni and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

You can listen to every episode of GSAPP Conversationshere. This particular episode is available to listen to directly on Soundcloud and through the iTunes store and iOS Podcasts app, where you can also Subscribe. GSAPP Conversations is a podcast produced by Columbia GSAPP's Office of Communications and Events in collaboration with ArchDaily.

Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: June 23, 2017, 10:30 am

On the morning of April 24th, Delhi’s architecture community reacted in shock and disgust to the news that the city's Hall of Nations and the four Halls of Industries had been demolished. Bulldozers had worked through the previous night at the Pragati Maidan exhibition grounds in central Delhi, where the Indian Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO) razed the iconic structures to the ground, ignoring pleas from several Indian and international institutions.

© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/33834913@N00/409859817'>Flickr CC user Panoramas</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/33834913@N00/409859817'>Flickr CC user Panoramas</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>

On the morning of April 24th, Delhi’s architecture community reacted in shock and disgust to the news that the city's Hall of Nations and the four Halls of Industries had been demolished. Bulldozers had worked through the previous night at the Pragati Maidan exhibition grounds in central Delhi, where the Indian Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO) razed the iconic structures to the ground, ignoring pleas from several Indian and international institutions.

The Hall of Nations, the world’s first and largest-span space-frame structure built in reinforced concrete, holds special significance in India’s post-colonial history—it was inaugurated in 1972 to commemorate twenty-five years of the young country’s independence. The demolition was met with widespread condemnation by architects and historians alike, not just because of the loss of an important piece of Delhi's heritage, but also for the clandestine manner in which the demolition was conducted.

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The demolition was part of a comprehensive redevelopment plan—the adjacent Nehru Pavilion was demolished sometime in the ensuing week—to make way for a “world class, iconic, state of the art” Integrated Exhibition and Convention Centre (IECC) at Pragati Maidan. The architect of the structures, Raj Rewal, called it “an act of outrage” since the matter was sub-judice in the Delhi High Court at the time, with hearings scheduled for April 27, 2017, and May 1, 2017, on a writ petition filed by The Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH). Rewal’s own related petition in the same court, to declare and preserve the structures as a “work of art of national importance,” had been dismissed just four days earlier, owing to a legal loophole concerning the definition of heritage. The ITPO stealthily used this narrow, week-long window to go ahead with its plans, thus evading judicial scrutiny.

There are two significant questions that beg to be asked at this point. First, how in a city with several heritage preservation agencies does a situation arise where the judiciary is left to make calls on the fate of structures widely viewed as having heritage value? Second, what exactly constitutes the architectural heritage of a city with a history spanning more than two millennia?

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragati_Maidan,_Hall_6.JPG'>Wikimedia user Kprateek88</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragati_Maidan,_Hall_6.JPG'>Wikimedia user Kprateek88</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

The answer to the first question concerns Delhi’s messy bureaucratic machinery: there are as many as nine agencies, including the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the city’s municipal corporations, and INTACH, concerned with the protection of the city’s notified built heritage—all with varying degrees of power and influence. The buck stops with the Heritage Conservation Committee (HCC), which works under the Indian Government’s Ministry of Urban Development. The ITPO, while defending its case in the Delhi High Court, relied heavily on the HCC’s recent decision to only consider buildings sixty years or older for inclusion in its heritage list. The decision itself, which left several other post-independence buildings in a legal vacuum of sorts and vulnerable to being demolished, is widely believed to have been driven by real estate concerns alone, and was criticized as a mere excuse to raze the structures by A G K Menon, former convener of INTACH’s Delhi Chapter.

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Menon has vociferously campaigned for the protection of Delhi’s “modern heritage” ever since the demolition of the Chanakya Cinema in 2008, which prompted INTACH to present a tentative list of sixty-two such buildings in Delhi to the HCC for protection in 2013. The list, which included buildings like Fariborz Sabha’s Bahá'í House of Worship and Joseph Allen Stein’s India Habitat Centre was “under consideration” by the HCC for over three years, and was only rejected once INTACH approached the Delhi High Court in 2016 alleging “complete abdication” of responsibility by the HCC. The decision was not surprising, as historian Narayani Gupta writes in a polemic in the Indian Express: “When ‘heritage’ is subsumed under ‘urban development’, what is the likely outcome?” she asks, suggesting that the HCC should ideally lie under the purview of the Ministry of Culture.

In regard to our second question, Delhi-based architect Gautam Bhatia notes in India Today how the city’s “selective preservation and development have left a legacy inconsistent with its real history.” His words couldn’t ring more true today: for example, the Purana Qila, the medieval fortress of the Mughal city of Sher Garh, stands unperturbed under the ASI’s protection—quite rightly so—just across the road and barely two-hundred meters south of Pragati Maidan, while the Hall of Nations lies in ruins. “While Mughal and colonial examples are allowed to persist as historical markers, little of post-independent life is preserved in public architecture,” Bhatia says. Is age to be the sole criterion to ascertain the heritage value of a building? Is a building’s architectural, cultural, or international significance of no consequence?

The Purana Qila, less than 200 meters from the Hall of Nations site, is covered by the Heritage Conservation Committee due to its age.. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/robphoto/2748901660'>Flickr user robphoto</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> The Purana Qila, less than 200 meters from the Hall of Nations site, is covered by the Heritage Conservation Committee due to its age.. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/robphoto/2748901660'>Flickr user robphoto</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

To put things into perspective, the Hall of Nations, designed as the centerpiece of the Permanent Exhibition Grounds hosting the Asia72 trade fair, was called “a new step in the development of modernity in terms of aesthetic, constructive innovation and social engagement,” by Aurélien Lemonier, the curator of the department of architecture at Centre Pompidou, Paris. The International Union of Architects, in a letter to the Indian Prime Minister, identified it as a “living testimony to India's contribution to the contemporary architecture and engineering excellence.” With several other letters of support from leading Indian and international organizations such as ETH Zurich and New York's Museum of Modern Art noting its architectural and engineering ingenuity, as well as a Change.org petition with 4,300 signatures sent to the Indian Prime Minister, was it not imperative to recognize and honor the heritage value of these structures?

There’s no dearth of precedent for modernist buildings being declared heritage structures. In India itself, the Le Corbusier-designed Capitol Complex in the northern city of Chandigarh, was accorded the UNESCO World Heritage Site honor as recently as 2016. The issue, many believe in the capital of the world’s largest democracy, is inherently political in nature. “For too long, architecture has been the victim of political decisions. Since major monuments all have historic associations, it falls on the political party in power to decide the relevance of that association,” observes Bhatia. India has been largely governed by the center-left Indian National Congress (INC) for the majority of its post-independence chapter. Congresswoman Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India from 1966 to 1977, took a personal interest in the construction of the Permanent Exhibition Grounds as the eponymous Nehru Pavilion was to house a permanent exhibition on the life of her father, India’s first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru.

Image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragathi_maidan_Delhi1.jpg'>Wikimedia user Rameshng</a> in public domain Image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragathi_maidan_Delhi1.jpg'>Wikimedia user Rameshng</a> in public domain

The ruling center-right nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, which rode a strong wave of anti-incumbency to a heavy majority in the Indian Parliament in 2014, challenges Nehru-vian policies, seeking to move away from the welfare-state economics of the INC in order to be seen as pro-development; the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, chaired by the Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, approved the redevelopment plan of Pragati Maidan in January this year. Development—but at what cost? Speaking to The Hindu, historian Sohail Hashmi ventures as far as to say that the government’s primary target was the Nehru Pavilion and Menon agrees, saying that “They want to rewrite history in their own way.” Rewal calls them “philistines” while Bhatia reacts in hyperbole: “as [a former British] viceroy's house, could the Rashtrapati Bhavan [President’s Estate] not succumb one day to the rage of an irate nationalist?”

Another subject worth pondering over is the reason why this demolition did not create a public outcry outside of the intellectual community. The land of Gandhi has a rich history of peaceful non-cooperation, which was successfully employed by architecture students in 1989 against the government’s proposal to, ironically, install a seated statue of Gandhi himself, in place of the Edwin Lutyens-designed Canopy at the India Gate in New Delhi. So where were the rebels this time around? “We architects got engaged in our work and forgot we are leaving people behind. We’ve not been able to communicate our problems, our objectives, our goals,” Menon explains dejectedly. He also states that a monument like the Taj Mahal won’t meet the same fate as citizens understand its significance, something modern architecture is denied. “Also, the Taj Mahal is old, so you believe it cannot be replaced. Modern architecture suffers because it is modern. They think it can be replaced.” he adds.

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragatimaidanhall6.jpg'>Wikimedia user Raulcaesar</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragatimaidanhall6.jpg'>Wikimedia user Raulcaesar</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

At the end of the day, regardless of their heritage status, how difficult would it have been to not demolish these structures which occupy barely four percent of the total area of the complex, instead accommodating the IECC on the remaining 120 acres of land available to the ITPO? How difficult would it have been to open up the redevelopment brief to an international architectural competition which hinged on being able to deliver the ITPO’s requirements while contextualizing the new development around the Hall of Nations precinct? Because as Gupta concludes brilliantly in The Wire, “A truly world-class city is not one that destroys to build, but one where icons from different pasts live together happily.”

Author: Suneet Zishan Langar
Posted: June 23, 2017, 9:30 am

The project is a development of vertical housing, deployed with three buildings in a total extension of 10,126m2. A fundamental part of the project has to do with the terrain, because it conserves a canyon with a significant density of trees and plants, so that 80% of the land is destined for green areas and open space, this represents a privilege, given its urban condition.

© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque
  • Architects: Luis Aldrete
  • Location: Guadalajara, Jalisco, México
  • Area: 10126.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Onnis Luque
  • Project Coordination: Cynthia Mojica, Diego García C.
  • 1st Phase Collaborators: Denisse Sandoval, Miguel Valverde, Fausto Lazcano, Raúl Miranda, Jorge Muñoz.
  • 2nd Phase Collaboratos: Christian Coss, Catalina Joya, Adriana Villegas.
  • Art: Octavio Abúndez, Alejandro Almanza, Jerónimo Hagerman, Los Jaichakers, Pedro Reyes, Eduardo Sarabia.
  • Developer: Grupo CUBE
  • Developer Coordinator: Diego Quirarte
  • Structure: ANTEUS
© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque

From the architect. The project is a development of vertical housing, deployed with three buildings in a total extension of 10,126m2. A fundamental part of the project has to do with the terrain, because it conserves a canyon with a significant density of trees and plants, so that 80% of the land is destined for green areas and open space, this represents a privilege, given its urban condition.

Diagram Diagram
Master Plan Master Plan

The layout strategy liberates space by creating areas that dialogue and integrate with the landscape, in this way the set of public spaces, gardens and glen takes the structure of daily encounters that fosters collective coexistence. On the other hand the orientation of the buildings is worked to achieve the highest percentage of views from the units as well as the structural system was thought to give the interior a greater sense of privacy and the units configuration achieved a cross ventilation.

© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque
© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque

The concrete together with the landscape design give personality to the project keeping the atmosphere of the place to the maximum. The layout of the buildings leaves an interior space that front the street giving continuity to the low rise neighborhood.

Typical Floor Plan Typical Floor Plan
© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque
South Section South Section
© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: June 23, 2017, 9:00 am

As part of the Third Istanbul Biennial, NOHlab and architect Buşra Tunç collaborated with HAS Architects to create OCULUS: an experiential light and sound-based installation. The exhibit focuses on employing a historic location, the Single-Dome Hall of the historic Istanbul Imperial Arsenal, to reinterpret a spatial moment using technology and design. The central theme of the project is the experimentation of permanence, illustrated in the juxtaposition between the dynamic visuals displayed on the temporary structure and the 16th-century architecture.

© NOHlab © NOHlab

As part of the Third Istanbul Biennial, NOHlab and architect Buşra Tunç collaborated with HAS Architects to create OCULUS: an experiential light and sound-based installation. The exhibit focuses on employing a historic location, the Single-Dome Hall of the historic Istanbul Imperial Arsenal, to reinterpret a spatial moment using technology and design. The central theme of the project is the experimentation of permanence, illustrated in the juxtaposition between the dynamic visuals displayed on the temporary structure and the 16th-century architecture.

© NOHlab © NOHlab

The form of the installation is a response to the geometry of the existing dome. Offering a contemporary interpretation of the original building’s arches, the “light dome” is a geodesic structure that features large triangular panels on which visuals are displayed. Visitors step inside the space and are almost completely enveloped in the semicircle of interlocking screens, able to fully immerse in its atmosphere. 

© NOHlab © NOHlab

According to the architects, the sense that comes with being surrounded is meant to help disconnect the viewer’s consciousness of time and place. The top of the structure is left without panels, allowing for an uninterrupted dialogue between the exhibit and its context. To highlight this connection, a designated ray of light focuses itself on the oculus of the dome, then disperses. 

From the Architects: Taking the Single-Dome Hall as the focal point, the exhibition uses contemporary interpretations to alternate between old and new, whole and fragment, real and virtual, balanced and unbalanced states.

© NOHlab © NOHlab

The graphics guide viewers through a narrative that weaves together the tangible and virtual in an attempt to impart a disoriented perception of space. Undulating geometries sweep across the screens around the dark enclosure, shifting in color and light intensity. Ranging from visualizing fragments of architectural space to lush metaphysical landscapes, the project showcases a connection between design, technology, and environment. To complete the interactive performance, the visuals are accompanied by an atmospheric soundtrack scored by Giray Gürkal that queues itself to match its visual counterpart.

© NOHlab © NOHlab

The project’s intention is to represent the ideologies of HAS Architects—specifically showcasing a forward-thinking mindset that integrates digital technology with architectural thinking. Through its form and sensory experience, OCULUS situates itself as both installation art and a commentary on the spatial and temporal questions of the future of the built environment.

© NOHlab © NOHlab

Space & content design: NOHlab (deniz kader, candaş şişman), Buşra Tunç
Architecture and design direction: Buşra Tunç
Visual and sound direction: NOHlab
Animation design: NOHlab, Necmi Deniz Akıncı
Sound design: Giray Gürkal
Computational design: Veysel Açıkel
Graphic design: Ali Emre Doğramacı

News via: Buşra Tunç.

Author: Annalise Zorn
Posted: June 23, 2017, 8:00 am

Bee Breeders have announced winners for the Hong Kong Pixel Homes Competition, addressing the pressures of urban growth.

Courtesy of Bee Breeders Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders have selected winners of the Hong Kong Pixel Homes competition, seeking to address the pressures of expanding populations and urban growth on existing housing markets. The competition asked for solutions which would reconsider our entrenched conventional forms of housing with “formal, technological, and material strategies predicated on modularity and repetition”. In announcing the competition results, the jury applauded the exploration of density, amenity and public/private adjacency in the winning schemes, recognizing their consideration for novel approaches to domestic culture and tradition.

The competition winners, including noted ‘Green’ and ‘Student’ schemes, are set out below.

First Prize

Towers within a Tower: Lap Chi Kwong, Alison Von Glinow, Kevin Lamyuktseung

First Prize: Exterior Perspective . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders First Prize: Exterior Perspective . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

The winning scheme ‘Towers within a Tower’ reimagined the idea of vertical living. Rather than typical stacked apartments, individual units are staggered vertically, establishing a repetitive module for adapted use across Hong Kong. A stepped façade between floors allows for more exposure to natural light, whilst also incorporating circulation and courtyards.

By re-thinking the typical rental unit, the project re-postulates common urban housing. The woven circulation offers opportunities for chance encounters and shared narrative, re-imagining the idea of the street and neighbourhood. The vertical stacking of individual units develops a new tower paradigm, taking advantage of amenities more commonly provided in the sprawling expanse of single family neighborhoods, while engaging the end user in direct dialogue with the scale of the city - Jury comments.

Second Prize

Vertical Village: François Chantier, Maria Fernandez

Second Prize: Exterior Perspective. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Second Prize: Exterior Perspective. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

The second place proposal was hailed for its reformulation of typical domestic typologies in order to solve Hong Kong’s housing crisis. Using the vernacular gable, the scheme offers a varied sectional treatment to each module, providing a dynamic, rich spatial variety whilst helping to form an interconnected vertical village. A robust morphology, along with simplified post-and-beam construction results in a scheme which is both adaptable, economical, and flexible. 

Third Prize + BB Student Award

Upside - Down Machine: Yukang Yang, Jingwen Cui / Beijing University of Technology

Third Prize + BB Student Award: Exterior Render. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Third Prize + BB Student Award: Exterior Render. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

The third place proposal draws inspiration from the Metabolist capsule tower, furthering the micro-unit dwelling as a mechanized zone for flexibility, aesthetic appeal, and efficiency. Circulation and bathrooms are contained in a fixed central core, whilst living spaces rhythmically rotate and interchange. The scheme drew praise for its critique of the dystopian future of technical solutions to the housing crisis, offering an exacerbation of the problematic tendencies of urban living. Whilst not proposed as a firm solution, the scheme relies on the optimistic vision of the inherent fun in “relaying the activity of the private domestic sphere in a theater of spectacle for the public realm”.

BB Green Award

Hong Kong Pixel Homes - Lanterns of Lives: Danaiporn Pongamornprom, Thongchai Wongsrisuppakul, Veeramon Suwannasang.

Green Prize: Exterior Perspective . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Green Prize: Exterior Perspective . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

News via: Bee Breeders.

Bee Breeders Announce Winners of Stone Barn Meditation Camp Competition

Bee Breeders have selected winners of the Stone Barn Meditation Camp competition, seeking to create a place of refuge for individuals amidst the pristine natural beauty of one of Latvia's most remote regions.

Call for Submissions: Amber Road Trekking Cabins

The Amber Road trekking path is planned to allow long-distance hikers to traverse the country, reaching from the Latvia-Lithuania border to the Latvia-Estonia border. Receiving its name from the shiny specimens that wash up on the beaches to this day, the total length of the trekking path would be 530 km, and it would be included as part of one of the European long-distance paths, a network of 12 paths designated by the European Ramblers Association.

Bee Breeders Reveal New York Affordable Housing Challenge Winners

Bee Breeders have selected the winners of the New York Affordable Housing Challenge, inspired by barriers faced by the global population in our contemporary culture of housing scarcity and economic deprivation. The submissions provide various multifaceted architectural responses to scattered sites of various scales around New York City, "redefining the culture, economy, and experience of urban domesticity by means of space, material, morphology, or structure."

Author: Niall Patrick Walsh
Posted: June 23, 2017, 6:00 am

The Wedge house is a custom-built single family home located in the eastern suburbs of Athens, in the mountainous and full of pine trees area of Pikermi, named Drafi. The site is quite distinctive and has many challenging features. The main complexity is the steep terrain with an almost 20-meter- height-difference from one side of the site to the other. The virtually vertical cliffs on both edges made access very difficult, so when a mild inclined surface appeared in the middle of the site it was quite inevitable that the house would be situated there.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos
  • Design Team: Giorgos Iliadis, Zoe Roussou (Interior)
  • Structural Engineer: Christos Stavrogiannis
  • Mechanical Engineer: Antonis Togkas
  • Landscape Architect: Aggeliki Zografaki
© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos

From the architect. The Wedge house is a custom-built single family home located in the eastern suburbs of Athens, in the mountainous and full of pine trees area of Pikermi, named Drafi. The site is quite distinctive and has many challenging features. The main complexity is the steep terrain with an almost 20-meter- height-difference from one side of the site to the other. The virtually vertical cliffs on both edges made access very difficult, so when a mild inclined surface appeared in the middle of the site it was quite inevitable that the house would be situated there.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos

Our design concentrated in creating a house that utterly blends with its natural environment sustaining most of the existing pine trees. This supposition unavoidably led to a split-level house, accommodating the steepness and the fluctuations of the topology. Two distinct blocks, facing north and west, sit on different levels, and come together in the middle with a wedge-shaped volume that forms the entrance and the vertical circulation leading to the main spaces of the house. The entrance emerges in a tight exterior passage that opens up to the whole interior enclosure, immediately as someone enters, surprising the visitor to the house’s unpredictable nine-meter- height interior.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos

Both block facades completely open up through large glazing surfaces to the view of the pines trees and the hills beyond, concealing the boundary between the interior of the house and its surrounding environment.

Section 01 Section 01
Section 03 Section 03

The composite structure allows all finishes to appear in their natural state. The basic four walls are covered in stone, to seem as they are coming through the earth, connected to the exposed wooden roof only through a series of triangular aluminum windows. A butterfly roof, which reverses the conventional icon of the pitched roof house, lets natural light to enter through those high windows on the back side of the building.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos

The wedge permeates the roof as well, creating a skylight right above the metal stairway that leads down to the living room, kitchen and dining room, all based on the ground floor of the block facing north. The three bedrooms only accessed through the wedge are situated on the block facing west.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos

Again, due to the site’s steepness, the parking garage stands next to the main entrance, right above the living spaces.

Ground Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan

At the lower edge of the site, beyond the road, there is a small canyon and a narrow stream coming through. Due to the height difference the stream is not visible, but the water sound is noticeable. A longitudinal swimming pool parallel to the direction of the stream, but at a higher level, reenacted that natural condition.

© Nikos Alexopoulos © Nikos Alexopoulos
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: June 23, 2017, 5:00 am

The research for the Cabin was initiated by OFIS, C+C, C28 and AKT along with contractor Permiz to develop Self-contained wooden shell, which can be flexible and adaptable on different locations, climate conditions and terrains.

© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic
  • Architects: OFIS Architects
  • Location: Kanin, Slovenia
  • Architects In Charge: Rok Oman, Spela Videcnik, Janez Martincic, Tomaz Cirkvencic, Andrej Gregoric, Sara Carciotti, Lucas Blasco Sendon, Jose Navarrete Jimenez
  • Area: 30.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Janez Martincic
  • C+C Project Team: Claudio Tombolini, Cristiana Antonini
  • C28 Project Team: Francesco Sforza, Federico Pasqualini, Antonello Michelangeli
  • Structural Engineering: AKT, Milan Sorc - Projecta d.o.o.
  • Contractor: Bostjan Perme - Permiz d.o.o. ( www.permiz.si ), Slovenia
© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic

From the architect. The research for the Cabin was initiated by OFIS, C+C, C28 and AKT along with contractor Permiz to develop Self-contained wooden shell, which can be flexible and adaptable on different locations, climate conditions and terrains.

Section Section

They can be used as holiday cabins, hide away, tree houses or short-time habitations for research, tourism or shelter; their small size allows easy and different transport possibilities.

© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic

The basic unit can contain habitation for 2 people with double bed, wardrobe, table with chairs and possibility to install bathroom, and kitchenette. If needed 2 or more cabins can be combined together creating a larger habitation that could inhabit 4-6 people. They can be combined vertically (like here in Parco Sempione) or horizontally.

© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic
Diagram Diagram
© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic

The structure are timber frames that are reinforced by plywood boards on both sides. The cabin can be fixed on the ground either by steel anchors or removable concrete cubes.

© Janez Martincic © Janez Martincic

The material promotes use of wood – natural, ecological and human friendly material. The façade and interior treatment can be changeable and flexible, so the unit in its material and finishing can be used in various site context.

The living units exhibited on Milan Design Week are available on Sale.

Structure Structure

Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: June 23, 2017, 3:00 am

The new bar takes place in the basement, previously unused, of the restaurant “La Maison du Sake” located rue Tiquetonne in Paris. The project proposes to occupy the small rooms by creating five thematic pieces, where you can consume the precious liquid: whiskey salon, japanese salon, tashinomi, bottle keep. Each space is characterized by its ceiling, which highlights the natural stone of the existing construction, supplemented by a minimalist and discreet furnishing, made in raw medium, metal and oak.

© Yann Deret © Yann Deret
  • Architects: jbmn architectes
  • Location: Paris, France
  • Lead Architects: Julien Boitard, Mike Nikaes
  • Collaborators: Antonio Orfino, Marie Delles, Rémi Mendes, Médéric Morel
  • Area: 210.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Yann Deret
© Yann Deret © Yann Deret

From the architect. The new bar takes place in the basement, previously unused, of the restaurant “La Maison du Sake” located rue Tiquetonne in Paris. The project proposes to occupy the small rooms by creating five thematic pieces, where you can consume the precious liquid: whiskey salon, japanese salon, tashinomi, bottle keep. Each space is characterized by its ceiling, which highlights the natural stone of the existing construction, supplemented by a minimalist and discreet furnishing, made in raw medium, metal and oak.

© Yann Deret © Yann Deret
Bar Plans Bar Plans
© Yann Deret © Yann Deret
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: June 23, 2017, 2:00 am

From the architect. Citizens of Qingdao have a strong sense of belonging to the sea, and this sense of belonging can be seen in every part of the public activities in this coastal city. Pier 6, where the cruise Terminal located, is surrounded by blue water and has the inherent advantage of developing a recreational park that combined with yacht rental services. With the complementary commercial functions and landscape, permanent and temporary exhibitions at the arrival and departure hall, the multi-functionality of the cruise terminal ensures that liveliness and richness of this coastal city can be sustained.

Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI
  • Architects: CCDI - Mozhao Studio & Jing Studio
  • Location: Qingdao, Shandong, China
  • Architecture Design: Zeng Guansheng, Yu Qing, Yan Zichang, Xu Chenglong, Zhao Xiaqing, Liu Guolin, Wei Xiyan, Yang Yingjin, Wang Wanjun, Tang Wenxiong
  • Program: Transportation, Office, Commerce, and Exhibition
  • Area: 59920.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Zhang Chao, Xia Zhi
  • Landscape Design: Zeng Guansheng, Yu Qing, Wei Xiyan, Zhang Yang, Liao Yiying, Yang Qian, Hong Yi
  • Interior Design: Zeng Guansheng, Yu Qing, Wu Longjun, Wang Wanjun, Yang Yingjin, Huang Bohao
  • Steel Structure Engineer: Tan Wei, Wang Wentao, Zhang Fan
  • Construction Drawings: Qingdao Yuanteng Design Firm
  • Curtain Wall Consultant: Tian Yuan Design
  • Lighting Consultant: Jin Zhaoming
Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI

From the architect. Citizens of Qingdao have a strong sense of belonging to the sea, and this sense of belonging can be seen in every part of the public activities in this coastal city. Pier 6, where the cruise Terminal located, is surrounded by blue water and has the inherent advantage of developing a recreational park that combined with yacht rental services. With the complementary commercial functions and landscape, permanent and temporary exhibitions at the arrival and departure hall, the multi-functionality of the cruise terminal ensures that liveliness and richness of this coastal city can be sustained.

Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI

Considering Qingdao’s prevailing northwest wind in winter, and the superior landscape conditions at the site’s south bay, this project includes a degrading terrace towards the South under the large structural span of steel, forming a major outdoor public platform. At the North façade on the third floor, there are a few outdoor sightseeing platforms for sea viewing, at the same time, providing partial interactive connections between the North and South sides. Similar to decks on the boat, these platforms provide space for relaxation and activities.

For this project, inspiration of the architectural form came from the “sail”, which is famous in Qingdao, The city of Sailing, as well as rows of pitched roof from Qingdao’s historical architecture. To further express the mechanical beauty, the steel structure is exposed on the exterior without curtain walls, so that the structural form becomes the most powerful language of the façade. The interior sprung roof reveals the main structure as possible as it can, so that passengers are still able to read the structural logic and mechanical beauty of the architecture.

Exploded Axonometric Exploded Axonometric
Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI

Interior and light

The arrival and departure hall on the first floor provides checking-in and luggage services. After that, through vertical lifts and walkways, passengers will arrive on the second-floor Foyer and wait for departure. The customer service is also located on the second floor. Its skylights, through the combination of aluminum board and glass, have transformed the inclined surface of the roof into stepped ramp, which has not only solved the problem of floodwater containment, but also introduced soft light with the modular rhythm of light and shadow. Meanwhile, the public hall of the cruise terminal can also hold temporary exhibitions and so on public activities.

Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI

The combination of different programs makes the cruise terminal become a daily leisure place for the public. At night when artificial lights bright up the indoor space, the transparent glass curtain wall will transform the entire architecture into a lantern illuminating the surrounding public plaza and green space.

Courtesy of CCDI Courtesy of CCDI
Author: 舒岳康 - SHU Yuekang
Posted: June 22, 2017, 10:00 pm

This weekend house is meant as a gathering and retreat place for a Gujarati family which is located in a posh western locality of the Ahmedabad. The design brief given by the owner was to develop the place more like a small resort.

© Radhika Pandit © Radhika Pandit
  • Architects: MODO Designs
  • Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
  • Architect In Charge: Arpan Shah
  • Area: 3600.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Radhika Pandit
  • Team : Prachi Bhavsar
  • Interior Design : Saptak Patel
  • Structural Consultants : Amee Associates
  • Landscaping : Amit Modha
© Radhika Pandit © Radhika Pandit

From the architect. This weekend house is meant as a gathering and retreat place for a Gujarati family which is located in a posh western locality of the Ahmedabad. The design brief given by the owner was to develop the place more like a small resort.

© Radhika Pandit © Radhika Pandit

Keeping this essential brief in mind, the house is designed as two blocks separated by open to sky space. The idea was to allow natural elements flow into the blocks and engage the users with these elements and thereby connect them to nature.

Floor Plan Floor Plan

The front block has the living, dining and verandah space which are more public in nature and are interpreted by glass pavilion. The rear block houses the private bedroom spaces and kitchen and hence more stark and introverted in expression. The sense of openness and flow prevails, to have inviting resort like feel.

© Radhika Pandit © Radhika Pandit

The glass pavilion is shield by the harsh sun through a deep verandah in south, an entry vestibule slab in east and through a wood screen in west. The pool located in south west part causes cool breeze to flow into the living and bedroom spaces.

Sections Sections

The house is intended to be informal in nature eliminating false ceiling in internal spaces and keeping exposed RCC slabs. The flooring in living and bedroom spaces is river washed Indian granite while all toilet has natural granite, slate and marble. The external walls have Indian granite cladding in certain portions and stone granule plaster. The internal walls explore direct paint without putty to have characteristic rustic look. The concern of using the waste is also explored in couple of toilets where granite waste is used to create random patterns.

© Radhika Pandit © Radhika Pandit
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: June 22, 2017, 9:00 pm

In a strategic move to consolidate its facilities across nine buildings on the Camperdown/Darlington campuses, Woods Bagot designed the flagship home for the new University of Sydney Business School. Catering to over 6,000 students, the project includes three 550-seat lecture theatres, eight 100-seat study rooms, 40 seminar rooms, a learning hub and 1,500 sqm of informal learning space. 

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein
  • Architects: Woods Bagot
  • Location: Sydney NSW, Australia
  • Area: 35000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Trevor Mein
© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

From the architect. In a strategic move to consolidate its facilities across nine buildings on the Camperdown/Darlington campuses, Woods Bagot designed the flagship home for the new University of Sydney Business School. Catering to over 6,000 students, the project includes three 550-seat lecture theatres, eight 100-seat study rooms, 40 seminar rooms, a learning hub and 1,500 sqm of informal learning space. 

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

One of the main objectives of the Business School was to reshape the conventional higher education triptych of teaching, learning and research. Drawing on this goal, the vision for the project was to create a 21st century learning environment that fosters productive interactions with the business community while responding to the needs of students. 

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

The functional floor plates provide a spectrum of learning environments positioned around a centrally-located social spine, encouraging collaboration and visual accessibility. Providing transparency and a sense of dynamism from the street to informal learning environments, the building is activated via the use of exposed stairs which link the various floors. 

1st Floor Plan 1st Floor Plan

The design offers an architectural solution in the form of a series of boxes clustered around social, collaborative, ‘sticky’ spaces. The clustered buildings interconnect with canopies and atrium spaces to provide a diversity of spaces for teaching and learning. The ‘social glue’ spaces provide transparency from the street to the informal internal learning environments and external learning spaces. Stair linkages aid in activating the building promoting pedestrian movement between floors. 

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

The architectural vernacular and fine grain of the building draws inspiration from the historic and textural character of the neighbouring terraces and university quadrangle. The exterior skin draws inspiration from the historic and textural character of the neighbouring Darlington terraces and the university quad. The double-skin façade system is intelligently designed to react to both the interior and exterior building adjacencies, with density and rotation of blades responding to desirable sightlines, privacy concerns and daylight penetration to study areas. In a contemporary reinterpretation of historic local sandstone, the stratification of terracotta baguettes integrates the architecture firmly within the campus aesthetic. 

3rd Floor Plan 3rd Floor Plan

The building celebrates the presence of the existing Sydney Blue Gum on the site by establishing the hardwood tree as a central feature around which the building wraps. This strong entry statement also acts as a bold visual and physical link reaching out to the community and main campus. Secondary entries throughout the site provide permeability to the campus and amenities.

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

Set back 11m from the property line, the design retained significant native trees creating a sense of ‘buildings in the park’. An integrated landscape concept was devised to supplement and connect the spectrum of learning and social spaces created by the architecture, incorporating ecological sustainable development and water-conscious landscaping. The spatial and material resolution of the landscape design maximises accessibility and ease of movement while contributing positively to public domain.

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein

Presenting a new iteration of a university community, the design has facilitated a creative, collegial and collaborative learning and research environment for the next generation of global business leaders.

© Trevor Mein © Trevor Mein
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: June 22, 2017, 8:00 pm

Su’ao is an urban township by the sea in Yilan County, Taiwan, and famous for its fresh sea products and the nearby harbor. This project was begun with a new technology, CAS (Cells Alive System) introduced by our client, TSC Anyong biotechnology and was hoping to build a tourism factory in Su’ao, rely on its geological advantage. The idea is to emphasize the interaction between the factory and customer, and optimize the relation between factory and the surrounding environment.

© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee
  • Architects: CYS.ASDO
  • Location: Su-ao,Yilan City, Taiwan
  • Architect In Charge: Chung-Yei Sheng
  • Design Team: Jill Yang, Orange Kang, Chieh Lai, Adolfo de Antonio
  • Area: 15000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: K. M. Lee
© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee

From the architect. Su’ao is an urban township by the sea in Yilan County, Taiwan, and famous for its fresh sea products and the nearby harbor. This project was begun with a new technology, CAS (Cells Alive System) introduced by our client, TSC Anyong biotechnology and was hoping to build a tourism factory in Su’ao, rely on its geological advantage. The idea is to emphasize the interaction between the factory and customer, and optimize the relation between factory and the surrounding environment.

© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee

Our architectural design approach is to allow the building blends into environment like how chameleon change its skin coloration based on temperature, light intensity, physical condition, and many other reasons. Therefore, we created geometrically perforated metal panel systems in three green colors and numerous sizes of holes rearranged into a large piece of exterior skin around the overall steel frame structure. Also, by pushing one side of the metal screen towards center and with rhombus structure frame on the back, each panel system looks like stacking up on top of another. By doing so, these panel systems offer different types of astonishing feature and expression on the skin surface according to seasonal variations and changes of weather.

Diagram Diagram

The factory produced various fishery products, mainly frozen fish in CAS technology (quick freezing) method, fish processed goods such as fish balls and fish oil. Most of these products will deliver to local markets and restaurants outside the factory. Moreover, we also provide our own market and restaurants in the building, so the market will be selling our processed goods, and many of the restaurants dishes are made from our products as well. The waste and residue from fishery production will be recycled to the green house on the upper floor to grow vegetable, and our vegetable will be returned to the market and restaurants to serve as one of our production.  

© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee
Section Section
© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee

We have Processing I and Processing II on the first and second floor, central kitchen on the basement, and green house on the third floor. By arranged each main functioning space intricately, we allow to have the production processes go all the way from the basement to the top floor, and our visitors can directly view how their purchase is been made. Unlike traditional factory, we broke down conventional layout, relocate and place each processing area separately but improve its circulation with other program, and most important is our visitor will be able to interact with each program simultaneously.

© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee

After placing the factory’s program, the negative space become a large public space for visitor to interact with each processing area. The visitor will immediately attract by the sunlight penetration through the high ceiling at the top with enormous rhombus structure skylight when they enter the space. The great amounts of sunlight with mimicked garden lighting in the wide open lobby area bring the whole space an outdoor atmosphere. While the visitors experience the public space floor by floor, the bridges located on each floors and the escalators intricately throughout whole space performs and indicates the idea of factory production complexity. In addition, the mix match combinations of monochrome flooring tiles and wooden wall panels’ arrangement correspond to the “texture” from the environment and the exterior façade.

Diagram Diagram

Apart from the self-sufficiency between factory production and markets consumption, enhance sustainable development was one of the big idea. We aim to build a self-sufficient community in this building by growing its own food, produce its own energy, and turn its waste system to a loop regenerative system. By installing solar panel system and rainwater collection in traditional way, we decided to integrate them into one piece of structure on the rooftop. Therefore, we hold up the solar panel system off the ground instead of just attach them on the surface, and installed the rainwater collection system on the back side of the solar panel system. Therefore, under the solar panel system become an interesting space, and visitor will be able to tour around the rooftop and see how this building functions environmental friendly.

© K. M. Lee © K. M. Lee
Author: 罗靖琳
Posted: June 22, 2017, 7:00 pm

Taking advantage of a larger than usual inner city site, the clients wanted a garden focussed dwelling with accommodation for a growing family. The semi circular courtyard was introduced to help living spaces flow together, while providing some separation. The garden will eventually dominate all views – creating an urban oasis.

© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran
  • Architects: ITN Architects
  • Location: Melbourne VIC, Australia
  • Lead Architect: Aidan Halloran
  • Collaborators: Jomil Engineering
  • Area: 280.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Aidan Halloran
© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran

From the architect. Taking advantage of a larger than usual inner city site, the clients wanted a garden focussed dwelling with accommodation for a growing family. The semi circular courtyard was introduced to help living spaces flow together, while providing some separation. The garden will eventually dominate all views – creating an urban oasis.

© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran
Ground Level Plan Ground Level Plan
© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran

What was salvageable of the existing house, was retained and refurbished, with new living spaces, master bedroom and study added as a separate structure- joined by a glazed bridge.

© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran

The simple geometric shapes reference early modern architecture of Melbourne, such as Roy Grounds.

North/South Elevation North/South Elevation
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: June 22, 2017, 5:00 pm