Events/News

Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 ShowcaseDecember 5, 2017, 6:30pmThe HouseCome check out the design projects that Berkeley Innovation's consultants have been working on this semester! Projects range from UI/UX design for mobile and web applications to industrial design projects for companies around the Bay Area.

Whether you're supporting a friend, interested in human-centered design, or just curious about what we do at Berkeley Innovation, we hope to see you there!

The event will begin at 6:30pm with light refreshments and exhibits for all of our projects.

Please RSVP via Eventbrite - we hope to see you there!
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Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 Showcase

2 months ago

LAEP Ferdinand Ludwig LectureNovember 6, 2017, 5:30pmWurster HallFerdinand Ludwig studied architecture and graduated with his PhD thesis “Botanische Grundlagen der Baubotanik und deren Anwendung im Entwurf”. He is a pioneering architect in the field of “Living Plant Constructions” (Baubotanik). In the recent years he designed and realized highly regarded projects that combine growth processes of living plants with an engineering approach.

In his PhD-studies, he developed multiple horticultural construction techniques and analysed botanical rules of growth to deduce construction rules for living plant constructions. In 2007 he was one of the co-founders of the “Research Group Baubotanik” at the Institute of Architectural Theory at the University of Stuttgart. Since that time he organized different workshops and hold many lectures on Living Plant Constructions at the University of Stuttgart and worldwide.

5:30 Reception – 2nd Floor Lobby Wurster
6:00 Lecture – 112 Wurster Auditorium



www.asla-ncc.org/event/ferdinand-ludwig-lecture/?instance_id=1704
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LAEP Ferdinand Ludwig Lecture

3 months ago

Design Lab NightLifeNovember 2, 2017, 6:00pmNightLife at the California Academy of SciencesScience and art unite! NightLife partners with the California College of the Arts to explore the many ways design impacts lives, culture, and science.

Tickets: bit.ly/2ijveFd
Music by DJ Sake One

→ Explore innovative ideas in fields from industrial and interaction design to illustration and architecture when African Hall transforms into a gallery full of projects, games, and installations by CCA students.

- Compete to be the top chef of the year 2050 in the Future Food Lab
- Challenge your friends to an interactive puzzle game inspired by Alan Turing
- Become a temporary cyborg
- Choose your own sci-fi adventure
- Build your ideal city through explorations of urbanism
- Print your own penguin memento!

→ Get creative with design groups PSY/OPS Type Foundry and the Museum of Craft and Design to design your own monogram and create wearable "8-bit" designs out of pearler beads.

→ At the Project Lab, learn about just a few of the ways that design and technology are used in the science lab with guests from UCSF, Stanford, and Abate Lab. They’ll show off their work with synthetic receptors, 3D-printed viruses, interspecies communication, and more.
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NIGHTLIFE TIPS:

- Last entry for our Rainforest dome is at 7:45 pm. Please note: drinks are not allowed inside the Rainforest exhibit.

- Planetarium passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Early event arrival is strongly recommended due to limited capacity and high demand for passes.

- Enjoy a different fresh seasonal "craft on draft" cocktail at each NightLife bar area. All bars accept cash and credit cards.

- A variety of food options are available at NightLife, including The Academy Café, The Terrace, and a food cart located in the front lobby.

- Special programs and lectures may have limited seating and admission will also be made available to visitors on a first-come, first-served basis.

- Programming lineup subject to change.
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Design Lab NightLife

3 months ago

HEX: Hone & Explore with Innovative Design!October 14, 2017, 11:00am126 Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, United StatesInnovative Design presents HEX: Hone & Explore, a series of workshops where students come to learn and teach design!

Join us for three weekends of free, drop-in workshops for all skill levels! Come out to learn from and meet fellow design-minded bears. We also encourage auditing workshops of different skill levels and disciplines. Come in, hang out and observe the process.

Workshops run hourly from 11 AM - 4 PM on Sat Oct 14th, Sat October 21st, and Sat Oct 28th in 126 Barrows. No experience is necessary for interested students!

hex.innovativedesign.club/

Check this event page and the above website for workshop times and updates!!

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SATURDAY 10/14:

• Intro to Illustrator
• Low Poly Art
• UI/UX Portfolio Building
• Intro to InDesign
• Hand Lettering

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SATURDAY 10/21:

• Intro to Lightroom
• Intro to Film Photography
• Bullet Journaling
• HTML/CSS
• Designing Your Logo & Brand

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SATURDAY 10/28:

• Crafting an Effective Portfolio
• Web Game Design
• UI/UX Basic Design Principles
• Astrophotography
• Interactive Web Design

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All workshops are taught and led by Innovative Design members.
innovativedesign.club/
instagram.com/innodatcal
twitter.com/innodatcal
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HEX: Hone & Explore with Innovative Design!

3 months ago

The Big Ideas Contest has fostered student-led innovation on the UC Berkeley campus since 2005. The Contest, now open to all 10 University of California campuses, provides up to $300,000 in funding, skill-development and networks to students who have creative solutions to pressing social challenges. Among the eight categories in this year's contest is "Energy & Resource Alternatives" which should be of particular interest to CED students!

Application Deadline: 11/15/17 (12pm PT)

Learn more:
1. Information Session: Oct. 18, 6pm Blum Hall
2. Big Ideas Website: bigideas.berkeley.edu/
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4 months ago

Innovative Design Decal Infosession Fall 2017August 31, 2017, 6:30pm310 JacobsAPPLICATION: apply.innovativedesign.club


Ready to GET HANDS ON and learn new skills?

InnoD is back and ready for even more design education! This semester, we are offering our much-loved Intro to Photoshop and Illustrator, Graphic Design Principles, and Photography Principles decals.

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WHERE AND WHEN

This semester, due to high demand, we will have two back-to-back full identical info sessions in 310 Jacobs.

Info Session 1: Thursday August 31st 6:30 pm - 7:20 pm
Info Session 2: Thursday August 31st 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm

Both sessions will have the same information about all three decals. Due to safety regulations, we can only allow 130 people in 310 Jacobs at a time. Please line up early for the 6:30 session because we cannot guarantee admission when the room is full. You may be relegated to the 7:30 session.

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Applications, deadlines, and a rough course list will be discussed during the info session.


DeCal Times:
*Intro to Photoshop/Illustrator (4 sections): Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM
*Graphic Design Principles (1 section): Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM
*Photography Principles (2 sections): Tuesday 7:00-9:00PM; Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM


Check out the Intro course lessons at innovativedesign.club/decal

***Info session is mandatory for admission. If you absolutely cannot make it, please email us at innod.decal@gmail.com.***

If you already have experience under your belt, consider applying to Innovative Design and joining our graphic design, photography, or web design teams! We're hosting our club info session on Thursday 9/7 @ 8PM-9PM, location TBD. Event page here: tinyurl.com/yc3bpv2r

Visit our website at innovativedesign.club/ and like our Facebook page to stay updated!

Got a ~burning~ question? Email us as innod.decal@gmail.com
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Innovative Design Decal Infosession Fall 2017

5 months ago

Hello Everyone!! Design for America is back and ready for action! We are so excited to share everything we have in store with you and the UC Berkeley community.

If you want to join a group of incredibly diverse, passionate, interdisciplinary group of engineers, designers, and entrepreneurs keep reading!!!

Design for America (DFA) at UC Berkeley is a student-driven human-centered design studio. We integrate concepts from design thinking into ideation of solutions ultimately meant for social good. Every year, DFA members work on teams to co-create products, systems, and services for our community partners. Each team is focused on a different social issue that resonates with them and their community partner. We are one of 38 college studios nationwide.

This year our teams are focusing on optimizing free health care services with data and educating youth on food justice in the Bay Area!! Keep your eye out for a more detailed description on the teams and their leaders.

We have information sessions on Tuesday, September 5, 7-8PM and September 6, 5-6PM. Location is TBD but if you are interested in DFA and want some FREE dessert, come join us!!

Some cool things that you might experience while with DFA are:
- Collaboration with the most passionate, creative, and hardworking people
- Working on real social issues that mean something to you
- Being part of an entrepreneurial community that pushes you to do your best in any discipline or background that you come from, whether that be engineering, film, math, business, biology, or art
- Learning from the many awesome workshops that we'll be hosting this semester
- Giving back to the community that we live in

Our application will be open for fall 2017 recruitment 9/1, but in the meantime join us at one of our info sessions and at Calapalooza on 8/31 from 3-7 PM! Looking forward to meeting everyone!
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5 months ago

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Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 RecruitmentAugust 28, 2017, 8:00pmBerkeley InnovationBerkeley Innovation is UC Berkeley’s premier human-centered product design consultancy. Our consultants come from a wide range of disciplines, but we all share a love for design thinking and innovation.

Each semester, we work on design projects that give members hands-on experience with the entire design process, from conducting user research to building and marketing prototypes. Projects tackle contemporary, real-world issues for clients such as Quora, Westfield Malls, Indiegogo, and Ford Motors -- and range from UI/UX design to interaction design to physical device design.

We exist as a community for students who are interested in product design to develop their design skills and experience, and alumni have gone on to work for companies such as Khan Academy, Yelp, Google, Apple, and Facebook. We thrive at the intersection of technical feasibility, user desirability, and business viability.

Berkeley Innovation invites you to join us in designing the future.

Want to learn more? Come to our info sessions!

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RECRUITMENT TIMELINE

INFOSESSION #1
Wednesday, August 30 || 8:00 - 9:00 PM || Wheeler 120

INFOSESSION #2
Tuesday, September 5 || 6:00 - 7:00 PM || Jacobs 210

APPLICATION DUE
Thursday, September 7 || due 11:59 PM || tinyurl.com/BIFall2017

SOCIAL NIGHT (by invitation only)
Saturday, September 9 || 4:00 - 6:00 PM || Location TBA

INTERVIEW (by invitation only)
Sunday, September 10 || Location TBA

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Want to gain some human-centered design knowledge and experience before applying to Berkeley Innovation? Check out our Human-Centered {design.} DeCal! Learn more at the event page here: goo.gl/jsAmXf

If you have any other questions, shoot us an email at berkeley.innovation@gmail.com!
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Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 Recruitment

5 months ago

Is this real?

Zinc
The amazing Gravitylight offers a ray of hope to millions without electricity
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6 months ago

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ArchDaily

ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwide

Emmanuel @ Everitt is a small church sitting on a 200 sqm sliver of land in a mature landed residential estate. The original church occupied a single storey corner terrace house built in the 1940s. Plans for rebuilding came about after heavy downpour in October 2010 caused serious damage, rendering it unsafe for occupation.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)
© Roland Tan Yeow Teck © Roland Tan Yeow Teck

Text description provided by the architects. Emmanuel @ Everitt is a small church sitting on a 200 sqm sliver of land in a mature landed residential estate. The original church occupied a single storey corner terrace house built in the 1940s. Plans for rebuilding came about after heavy downpour in October 2010 caused serious damage, rendering it unsafe for occupation.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)

The unique setting of a religious building in a residential area caused concern to the planning authority. A protracted 4-year appeal process eventually rezoned the residential site as Place of Worship in April 2015, with the total floor area capped at original building footprint. Completed in September 2017, rebuilding this church took 7 years.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)

The church consists of 3 key areas- The Sanctuary, Fellowship Area and the Church Office/Pantry.  The Sanctuary seats 60 people.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)

While being elevated for flood protection, a singular off-form concrete volume was conceived, in line with the scale and height of the neighbourhood, creating a sensitive insertion into its existing fabric. Sky-lights punctuate the spaces, an allusion to the church as the Light of The World. Biblical names of God – Jesus, Christ, Saviour are strategically positioned within a naturally lit stairwell connecting 2 floors.

Sections Sections

A lush garden terrace on the roof required delicately balances the austere grey of the concrete volume. 3 large fibreglass planter boxes, each planted with 3 numbers of Caesalpinia ferrea trees alludes to the symbolism of the Trinitarian God – Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)

Emmanuel @ Everitt aspires to foster community spirit and encourage social sustainability by blending well into the neighbourhood, making it more than just a place of worship. Unlike the surrounding gated houses, doing away with a physical gate and party walls that slope back truly creates an open and welcoming environment for the people.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)

Since its opening, neighbours have been dropping by for coffee and conversations, bringing back a “kampong” spirit, a Malay term for village or neighbourly camaraderie.

© Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery) © Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: January 19, 2018, 7:00 pm

We performed the interior design for a beauty salon. Deliverables included a space exuding the radiance associated with beautiful, vibrant and shiny hair brimming with vitality. Therefore, we endeavored to create a space that would envelop the body in such radiance by making the entire ceiling into a luminous crystal symbolizing the ideal of resplendent hair.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki
  • Constructor: Seiko Service / Aslego
  • Pottery Art Design: Moriyuki Ochiai
  • Pottery Art Production: Nanzan Ito
  • Special Paint : Makoto Yamaguchi
  • Client: Spea international
© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Text description provided by the architects. We performed the interior design for a beauty salon. Deliverables included a space exuding the radiance associated with beautiful, vibrant and shiny hair brimming with vitality. Therefore, we endeavored to create a space that would envelop the body in such radiance by making the entire ceiling into a luminous crystal symbolizing the ideal of resplendent hair.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Metallic waves(Please refer to below for more information), representing the bright, aerial, gracious way in which hair flows, are intricately weaved into a white matrix of geometric patterns (a lattice structure featuring a signature color gradation of white and wooden tones) to produce a mystical luminous crystal from which a subdued light scatters as it bounces off the creases in the metal.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Abundant expressivity is imparted to the crystal of light by the overlapping of the white lattice and the metal wave, with the former gushing through the space like sparkling whitewater, and the latter producing a current filled with vibrant vitality.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Structurally, the white lattice compound consists of three dimensional lattice objects inserted between layers of planar grid objects, which are arranged to mutually interact, thereby further diversifying one’s experience of the space’s depth and expanse.

The light reflected off the metal waves and penetrating the white lattice produces intricate and constantly evolving expressions throughout the entire space that enables patrons to experience an ever-changing atmosphere as this layered structure will be perceived differently depending on their relative position and line of sight at any given time.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Furthermore, we created a space in which minute shifts in natural light can be felt throughout the day and the seasons, and the evolving landscape appreciated to the fullest, by playing with the configuration of the white lattice/metal wave compound according to each area and increasing the circumvolutions in the metal waves acting as reflectors inside the hair cutting area where natural light comes in the most.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

By increasing the density of the white matrix above the central aisle, we were able to lower the height of the ceiling and break up the rhythm to create a cozy and inviting space where the body can become immersed in a hushed vibe as it passes under the white crystal covering the ceiling.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Moreover, variations in the purple and powdery silver color gradation on the walls surrounding the shampooing area confers the sparkle of life to the space.
We sought to honor the beauty of hair and replicate the spatial experience of penetrating into its mysterious radiance and profound depth through the repeated entwinement of layers of lattice and metal.

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

【  Design method- ORIGAMI,KIMONO,FUROSHIKI - Japanese spirit of Monodzukuri 】
In a country with limited resources such as Japan, the spirit of Monodzukuri is the epitome of ingenuity at the service of craftsmanship.

From a single sheet of paper, which can be folded into a variety of shapes, emerged the art of Origami.
From a single bolt of fabric was born one of Japan’s most iconic garments: the Kimono.
From a single piece of cloth, which can be used to wrap and carry all sorts of objects, came the Furoshiki.
Taking inspiration from this cultural background, we used a single finite material—aluminum—as a simple planar surface from which we created an engaging three-dimensional space that fulfills various functions and requirements at once.

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: January 19, 2018, 5:00 pm

BIG has unveiled an updated vision for the new Campus Master Plan for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., after taking into account over 3 years of community input and collaboration with the storied museum and research institution. The revised proposal pays particular attention to the preservation of unique character of the Enid A. Haupt Garden while still addressing the existing and future needs of the Smithsonian at one of the nation’s most historically significant sites.

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

BIG has unveiled an updated vision for the new Campus Master Plan for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., after taking into account over 3 years of community input and collaboration with the storied museum and research institution. The revised proposal pays particular attention to the preservation of unique character of the Enid A. Haupt Garden while still addressing the existing and future needs of the Smithsonian at one of the nation’s most historically significant sites.

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

Founding partner Bjarke Ingels revealed the updated plan to members of the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) along with local leaders and residents, sharing in detail how the public feedback had resulted in the evolution of the $2 billion South Mall Campus restoration and revitalization plan. 

“Since our last proposal, we’ve been listening very closely to the public. We wanted the general feeling and fondness for the Haupt Garden to remain the same while also increasing its enjoyment and use, offering educational elements and after hour programs,” said Ingels.

“We also want to make more accessible some of the hidden treasures underneath the Haupt Garden – the National Museum of African Art and the Sackler Gallery – which are so well hidden that they’re under-enjoyed compared to the value they represent. If we can make them more accessible, more people might be tempted to explore.”

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

Located between 7th and 12th Streets along Independence Avenue SW on the National Mall, the site includes the Smithsonian Institution Building (known as the Castle), the Arts and Industries Building, the Freer Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the largely underground Quadrangle Building, which is home to the National Museum of African Art, the Sackler Gallery of Art and the S. Dillon Ripley Center.

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

BIG’s Master Plan will expand the Visitor Center and add a new Education Space beneath the garden, with access provided by peeling the edges of the landscape up. These design moves will also create clear connections between spaces and allow natural light to reach subterranean spaces. The plan will also reconfigure the entrance pavilions of the African Art Museum and the Sackler Gallery to increase their visibility. Other changes include updating mechanical systems and adding structural reinforcements to the Castle to protect against seismic activity.

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

Several architects and community members provided public reactions to the revised plan, noting that while many of the previous concerns have been addressed, some additional work will still be need to done to ensure the project best suits the needs of all involved parties and the public. 

“I got the impression that BIG finds itself between conflicting interests which remain to be reconciled,” commented Pascal D. Pittman, AIA, Director of Quality Assurance at the engineering firm Setty & Associates.  “I thought the presentation, based on the parameters that BIG described, provided for a very elegant solution.”

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

Robert Young, AIA, Associate Principal at Grimshaw and long-time DC resident and architect, added, “[the Smithsonian’s founding donor] James Smithson's call for ‘an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men’ is noble and grand, yet, like our beloved Mall, has not been able to fulfill its goals as it - and the population it serves - continually grows and changes. 

As the great facilities of the Smithsonian have fallen into disrepair or reach the end of their expected lives, and the great possibilities of the ‘Mall to Museum’ connection have frayed, it is the visionary response by the Smithsonian leadership and BIG that will allow a continued dialogue between our fundamental rights as citizens and our aspirations as humans. The work of BIG is bold, expressive, and often radically new: yet those characteristics are supported by thoughtful research, sympathetic engagement and conceptual synthesis.”

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG

The project will be carried out over several phases, with the first stage of the plan, the renovation of the Castle, anticipated to begin in 2021.

Additional images can be found here.

  • Architects: BIG
  • Location: 1000 Jefferson Dr SW, Washington, DC 20560, United States
  • Partners In Charge: Bjarke Ingels, Thomas Christoffersen, Kai-Uwe Bergmann
  • Project Managers: Aran Coakley, Ziad Shehab
  • Project Leaders: Alvaro Velosa, Daniel Kidd, Sean Franklin
  • Team: Aaron Hales, Alana Goldweit, Alexandre Hamlyn, Andriani Atmadja, Annette Miller, Benjamin DiNapoli, Benjamin Novacinski, Cadence Bayley, Choonghyo Lee, Chris Falla, Daisy Zhong, Daniele Pronesti, Doug Stechschulte, Emily Chen, Gabriel Hernandez Solano, Janice Rim, Jennifer Shen, Jeremy Alain Siegel, Jihoon Hyun, Julian Andres Ocampo Salazar, Kalina Pilat, Katarzyna Starczewska, Lina Bondarenko, Mahsa Malek, Manon Otto, Martin Voelkle, Ola Hariri, Otilia Pupezeanu, Saecheol Oh, Sara Ibrahim, Stephen Kwok, Stephen Steckel, Suemin Jeon, Tammy Teng, Taylor Fulton, Tianqi Zhang, Vincent Fulia, Wells Barber, Wesley Chiang, Zhifei Xu
  • Client: Smithsonian Institution
  • Collaborators: SurfaceDesign, Robert Silman Associates, GHT Limited, EHT Traceries, Stantec, Atelier Ten, VJ Associates, Wiles Mensch, GHD, FDS Design Studio, Kleinfelder
  • Area: 123000.0 m2

BIG Reveals 20-Year Restoration Plan for Washington DC's Smithsonian Campus

Nearly a year-and-a-half since the announcement of their selection, BIG has unveiled plans for a massive, 20-year-long overhaul for the Smithsonian's southern campus in the center of Washington DC.

Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: January 19, 2018, 3:25 pm

This building is characterized by its interplay between opacity and transparency and between interior and exterior. It is very carefully integrated into its setting, following the site’s topography so closely that the building appears to be sculpted from the landscape itself. The mix of materials and colours gives it character, while creating clear boundaries between different spaces.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau
  • Architects: Anne Carrier architecture
  • Location: Mont-Orford National Park, 3321 Chemin du Parc, Orford, QC J1X 7A2, Canada
  • Architect In Charge: Anne Carrier architecture
  • Area: 430.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Stéphane Groleau
  • Project Architect: Anne Carrier architecture
  • Designers: Anne Carrier, lead architect, Robert Boily B.Arch./ B.Sc.A., Patricia Pronovost architect, Mathieu St-Amant architect
  • Structural And Civil Engineers: Les services exp inc.
  • Mechanical Engineer (Electrical): Martin Roy et Associés
  • Landscape Architect: Agence Relief Design
  • General Contractor: Construction Longer
  • Client: Société des établissements de plein air du Québec (Sépaq)
© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

Text description provided by the architects. This building is characterized by its interplay between opacity and transparency and between interior and exterior. It is very carefully integrated into its setting, following the site’s topography so closely that the building appears to be sculpted from the landscape itself. The mix of materials and colours gives it character, while creating clear boundaries between different spaces.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

Strategies for site integration and spatial organization
The new building sits in a forest, along a narrow escarpment on Camping Road, with Stukely Lake and its beach below. The first half of the building’s main volume gently follows the same contours from which the outdoor amphitheatre is carved. A stratum of the building’s landscape-roof rises gently, echoing the park’s topography. In the centre, part of the building is open to an expansive view of the lake before taking a sharp change of direction, highlighting the building’s entrance and defying the slope. The building plunges toward the breathtaking view of the island and Mont Chauve.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

The service (kitchen) area is tucked away discreetly, while the patio and discovery space layer three strata with different geometries. The first, the storage area for sports equipment, has a functional geometry aligned with activities and the lake; the second is the patio, which adjusts to both perimeter and interstitial traffic; and the third is the roof, rising higher to open up the view of Mont Chauve; it is angled upward to better control incoming natural lighting. 

Not unlike a gazebo, the interior and exterior spaces are interconnected by a network of walkways comprising a catwalk, stairs, covered passageway and an outdoor gap based on the natural course of the trails.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau
Garden Floor Plan Garden Floor Plan
© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

Materials: wood in every form
The park’s lakes, mountains and forests provided inspiration for the choice of materials. The buildings have a symbiotic relationship with the site’s extraordinary landscape and the materials found there. Wood, in various forms, gives both interior and exterior spaces warmth and coziness. It works in harmony with the indigenous vegetation used for landscaping, and with the slate paving stones and gabion walls that characterize the paths and landscaping. 

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

The architectural approach and the site itself dictated the use of vertical cladding echoing tree trunks in the nearby forest. The textures, materials and colours used, in harmony with tree bark, cause the building’s appearance to shift with each passing hour. Crafted specifically for this project, the building’s cedar cladding is applied in alternating strips—recessed, in relief, gaps. As a result, the shadows falling on the building change as the sun moves across the sky. After nightfall, the effect transforms the storage areas into gigantic lanterns. The cedar cladding is also used for rain barriers and ventilated façades in a simple but clever way, by removing or keeping the recessed portion. 

The building’s organic configuration, in symbiosis with the site, nearby activities and views, demands that the main volumes include certain openings. Smoother and paler cedar cladding is used in these locations, evoking the contrast between skin and flesh in freshly cut fruit, enabling a coherent reading of the building.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau

First in a series of three
The Centre de Services Le Bonnallie is the first of three buildings to be built by the Anne Carrier architectural firm in Mont Orford Park.

Collectively, the projects will give the park a unique, identity-shaping architectural signature. The continuity of the approach, focused on clear architectural expression, will lead to rich, stimulating places that sustain a constant dialogue with users and the environment, in every season.

© Stéphane Groleau © Stéphane Groleau
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: January 19, 2018, 3:00 pm

Foster + Partners has revealed designs for the new headquarters of the PGA TOUR to be located in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Located on a large freshwater lake at the TPC at Sawgrass resort, the 187,000-square-foot building will create an “uplifting and inspiring” environment for employees and visitors through its transparent walls, lush greenery and all-encompassing roof structure.

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners

Foster + Partners has revealed designs for the new headquarters of the PGA TOUR to be located in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Located on a large freshwater lake at the TPC at Sawgrass resort, the 187,000-square-foot building will create an “uplifting and inspiring” environment for employees and visitors through its transparent walls, lush greenery and all-encompassing roof structure.

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners

Drawing inspiration from the nearby ‘Island Green’ 17th hole at THE PLAYERS Stadium Course, the PGA TOUR headquarters is designed to take advantage of its verdant surroundings, incorporating principles of biophilia and optimizing natural light and air.

“Inspired by the lush greenery of TPC Sawgrass and the beautiful Floridian light, the new PGA TOUR headquarters is designed as an extension of its surrounding landscape,” explains Nigel Dancey, Head of Studio, Foster + Partners. “As the Global Home of the PGA TOUR, it brings the organization under one roof for the first time, and signifies the progressive spirit of the TOUR.”

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners

Expansive growth of the organization of the past few decades has resulted in the expansion of its offices into multiple, disjointed buildings across Ponte Vedra Beach and St. Augustine, resulting in a work environment that is not conducive for collaboration. The new headquarters remedies this situation by bringing together employees of all areas under one single roof, clad with warm wood and featuring five sensuous curved openings to the sky.

The interior spaces also reflect this openness, with flexible floorplates and non-hierarchical office arrangements. The building is separated into two enclosed bays connected by 20-foot-wide bridges to encourage random interaction and allow for informal meetings without impeding the flow of circulation. Terraces located on the far ends of the building along the atrium will also create meeting spaces and room for workers to refocus outside of their direct workspace.

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners

The building is also aiming for high standards of environmental sustainability, targeting an anticipating LEED Gold rating. Extended overhangs over the building envelope will reduce solar gain into the building, while the five large skylights will allow natural light to penetrate the space. The roof may also be clad with a series of photovoltaic panels to support the building’s energy needs. A raised floor system will provide flexibility and targeted air conditioning. In addition, site-wide recycling facilities and a 1.3 kilometer running track will contribute to employee well-being.

“As we strive to reach an increasingly diverse, more global fanbase and position the PGA TOUR for future success, we must be equipped to meet the ever-changing landscape in international business, media and technology,” said PGA TOUR Commissioner, Jay Monahan. “Moving forward with this beautiful new global home in Ponte Vedra Beach will allow for more creative, efficient collaboration among our staff and partners, and will set us on the right path toward achieving our goals as an organization.”

News via Foster + Partners.

Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

INTRODUCTION
The clients needed a small restoration of a house built in 1983 and, specially, the creation of a new space to work.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula
  • Structure: Diagonal Arquitectura
© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

INTRODUCTION
The clients needed a small restoration of a house built in 1983 and, specially, the creation of a new space to work.

Site Site

The building was very badly adapted to the land, the original topography. It was divided into two platforms separated by a retaining wall of 6 metres height. This wall generates a very important visual impact and provokes the isolation of two platforms.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

The building was very badly adapted to the land, the original topography. It was divided into two platforms separated by a retaining wall of 6 metres height. This wall generates a very important visual impact and provokes the isolation of two platforms.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

On the inferior level there was a garden and a swimming pool in a bad condition.
Although the exterior space had many possibilities to enjoy it, it was completely separated from the house by retaining wall and the two platforms were communicated by a simple stair not facilitating their use.
Els clients necessitaven una petita reforma d’una casa existent construïda l’any 1983 i, sobretot, una ampliació per a poder tenir un nou espai de treball.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

THE PROJECT’S PRIMARY GOALS
The aim of the project was to completely rehabilitate the building, adapting it to the clients’ requirements.
The program set out to solve the segregation between the two platforms, creating a new connection with the main garden, that could decrease the visual impact of the retailing wall at the same time; and also generating a new space to work.
To achieve this transformation we have designed a light metallic stair that is separated of the retaining wall, generating a new level between the two platforms, where we have situated the new space to work.
This new space is a volume made of wood that changes the vision of the retaining wall, and creates three new spaces in addition:

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

• A new terrace at the level of the original house, that changes the use of the previous narrow one.
• A new wooden volume, situated in the middle of the two old levels, creating a new studio directly opened to the main garden. It is an autonomous element and bioclimatic which it means, that it does not need heating or refrigeration. Such space is justified by its relative litheness and the desire to establish a provoking dialogue with the original structures.
• A new frame, a portico, situated at the level of the inferior garden, where the swimming pool is. This space allows clients the possibility to enjoy of a sunny terrace.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

3.- A NEW ROUTE
The new access to the main house is designed as a protruding balcony made by a simple rectangular angle iron that supports the galvanized rebar in order to generate a new exterior space full of nuances of shadows; and another more positive vision of the retaining wall.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

On the contrary, the new space to work is a compact wooden volume, separated from the inferior level by a metallic structure. It is built with the frame System and the wooden slats of the facade provides a screen for preserving privacy, while also serving as solar protection in the summertime.

© Adrià Goula © Adrià Goula

All in all, with a simple volume and the simplicity of a new connection between the different levels of the plot we have achieved the total renovation of the previous building, and also got a pleasant house to live.

Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: January 19, 2018, 1:00 pm

Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled the design of a new mixed-use development to be located on the Vauxhall Cross Island site adjacent to Vauxhall Station in London. Aiming toward becoming a new public square for the neighborhood, the complex will consist of two towers connected by a street level podium, offering a variety of programmatic uses including a hotel, offices, residences, retail and public amenities.

© Slashcube © Slashcube

Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled the design of a new mixed-use development to be located on the Vauxhall Cross Island site adjacent to Vauxhall Station in London. Aiming toward becoming a new public square for the neighborhood, the complex will consist of two towers connected by a street level podium, offering a variety of programmatic uses including a hotel, offices, residences, retail and public amenities.

© Slashcube © Slashcube

Located on a site bounded by Parry Street (to the south), Bondway (to the east) and Wandsworth Road / Albert Embankment (to the west and north), the complex is located within an plot identified by the London Plan as a gateway to existing transportation links and a node with the potential to accommodate high-density development. Vauxhall itself has also been the site of a number of recent important and upcoming projects, including the Stirling Prize-winning Newport Street Gallery and the nearby future Nine Elms Bridge

“The design responds to Lambeth Council’s aspirations for a district centre for Vauxhall by creating a vibrant new public square adjacent to the busy rail, underground and bus interchange. The proposal also accommodates TfL’s existing plans to upgrade the traffic gyratory and bus station to provide greater accessibility and safety for all,” explain Zaha Hadid Architects.

“This project will generate approximately 2,000 new jobs in the borough within a mixed-use design that includes a new public square, homes, offices, shops and a hotel - providing vital civic space, amenities and employment for the growing Vauxhall community.”  

© Slashcube © Slashcube
© Slashcube © Slashcube

The Vauxhall Cross Island project will tap into this potential through four key design principles, as explained by the architects:

1.  Respond to Lambeth Council’s aspirations for a new district centre as set out in the Vauxhall Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) adopted in 2013. Principally through:

 

  • Providing an active and welcoming destination for Vauxhall
  • Creating a more defined street setting
  • Maintaining the importance of Vauxhall as a transport interchange

2.  Contribute to employment and jobs in the borough

The new proposal prioritise increased office and commercial space alongside a new Hilton Hotel that will be a major tenant for Vauxhall and will make a significant contribution to providing employment opportunities in the borough. The proposed scheme is estimated to create approximately 2,000 jobs across the hospitality, retail, building management and office-based sectors.

© Slashcube © Slashcube

3.  Enable TfL’s Vauxhall gyratory and bus station

TfL have separate plans to build a gyratory and bus station scheme next to Vauxhall Station. Whilst the schemes are independent of each other, the delivery of TfL’s proposed gyratory and bus station scheme requires land owned by VCI Property Holding to be implemented. The previously consented scheme for the site would have prevented the proposed gyratory changes.

4.  Respond to the emerging Vauxhall cluster

Reviewing the design of the buildings enables a scheme that will sit better within the context of the emerging Vauxhall cluster. The design works with the height of the other proposed developments in the area. 

© Slashcube © Slashcube

The architecture itself has been designed in response to these principles, creating a new public square along the highly trafficked route between Vauxhall Station and the TfL’s new bus stations on Bonday. This constant flow of people will allow the square to host a full program of community events, such as markets and performances. 

Encircling the square, the scheme calls for a 500+ room hotel, a mix of 260 private and affordable residences, 220,000 square feet of office space and 7,000 square feet of retail and dining space.

© Slashcube © Slashcube

While the scheme has been met with some backlash from individuals who believe the proposal is too large for the site, the developers and architects are continuing to work with the community to massage the scheme for optimal use.

News via Zaha Hadid Architects.

  • Architects: Zaha Hadid Architects
  • Location: London SW8 1SJ, United Kingdom
  • Site Owner & Developer: VCI Property Holding Limited
  • Development Manager: Great Marlborough Estates
  • Development Consultant: Dais
  • Engineering: Buro Happold
Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: January 19, 2018, 12:00 pm

Following the acquisition of a single-storey house from the 1950s in St-Lambert, the client wished to expand and renovate this "Prairie house" inspired building.

© Adrien Williams © Adrien Williams
  • General Contractor: Nicolas Deslauriers
  • Structural Engineer: Geniex
  • Intervention: Complete Transformation & Extension
© Adrien Williams © Adrien Williams

Text description provided by the architects. Following the acquisition of a single-storey house from the 1950s in St-Lambert, the client wished to expand and renovate this "Prairie house" inspired building.

© Adrien Williams © Adrien Williams

The existing house is partly demolished and rebuilt by reinterpreting features in a contemporary way such as a low and elongated profile, a overhanging roof and the use of masonry and wood on the facades. The roof is covered with finished steel zinc, while facades are composed with St-Marc limestone and insertions of panels in slats of cedar. The monolithic fireplace stands out as the main element which is a continuation between the internal living spaces and the garden. 

© Adrien Williams © Adrien Williams

Responding to client’s desire to create spacious and bright living spaces, the ground floor layout includes minimally a single bedroom adjoining a study and full bathroom. Conceived with transparency and lightness, the living spaces are surmounted by a 16-foot sloping ceiling at its highest point. In the idea of inducing a visual fluidity, the vestibule is delimited by glass panels contained within white painted steel frames.

© Adrien Williams © Adrien Williams
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: January 19, 2018, 11:00 am
© Elizabeth Felicella, courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery © Elizabeth Felicella, courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "How the Restoration of Louis Kahn’s Yale Art Gallery Helped Kickstart Modern Preservation."

I have a distinct memory from my days as an architecture student at the University of California Berkeley in the late ‘80s. During an architectural survey class taught by Spiro Kostof, Louis I Kahn’s Yale University Art Gallery popped up in the slideshow. “Nice building,” I thought, “but what’s with those windows?”

Fifteen years later at Polshek Partnership (now Ennead Architects), I would become the project architect for the construction phase overseeing the rehabilitation of that classic building—the most challenging aspect of which was to replace “those windows.” I came to understand, intimately, how the double-paned window wall had failed almost as soon as construction was complete. Condensation accumulated between the panes, creating the foggy effect that marred my first impression of this groundbreaking building.

© Christopher Gardner © Christopher Gardner

It was Kahn’s first major commission and he was determined to make an idealistic statement. Indeed one could argue that that was the essence of modernism—to create singular works of art, even when the design pushed the architecture beyond its technological boundaries. While architects appreciated the importance of Kahn’s achievement, the failure of the glass window wall and “years of callous alterations” (as the New York Times put it) contributed to a generalized sentiment about modernist architecture that persists to this day: not all significant buildings are worth saving.

And yet at a time when the usefulness of these buildings was in doubt, more so than even today, Yale made a commitment to not only rehabilitate it but also seamlessly integrate it into a larger three-phase, $135-million project that reconfigured the entire Yale University Art Gallery, a process that would take almost 20 years to complete. For the other two wings, built in 1866 and 1928, the importance of treating those buildings with the utmost of care and reverence was not an argument anyone had to make. Rehabilitating the Kahn gallery was not a given at the time, but ten years after reopening, it has become known as one of the most significant efforts to conserve modernist architecture that is, even now, a rare achievement.

On the occasion of the ten-year anniversary of the Kahn gallery rehabilitation (the other two buildings were completed in 2012), I decided to take a look back at the lessons learned from restoring a modernist classic, as well as a look forward at the ongoing need for modernist preservation. My process involved reminiscing with James Stewart Polshek about his relationship with Kahn and his work; returning to all three galleries for a tour with senior deputy director Pam Franks (with whom I worked throughout the renovation); talking with architecture critic James Russell; and interviewing an architectural historian with DOCOMOMO about the work that still needs to be done to save modernist buildings.

via Common Edge via Common Edge

My Contractor

Reflecting on the eight years that I oversaw the minutia that is the crux of historic rehabilitation work, I’ve come to realize that the most under-appreciated aspect of the job is getting the contractors to care about the details—no easy task in this case considering they did not have much affinity for the Kahn wing.

Where they saw dull gray walls, I’d point out the subtle pink hue of the concrete, which resulted from the local sand used in the mixture. While they wrestled with the outdated track lighting, I’d point out its importance as the first known lighting system of its kind. When they grew impatient as we exhaustively researched replacement materials for the stairwell, I’d point out the beautiful geometry of the triangular risers ascending a five-story cylinder—an iconic sculptural moment of tension and fluidity.

But it wasn’t until I had a breakthrough with the head electrician that I realized the importance of developing a shared vision with the very people who need to be the most invested in the details.

On one of many occasions when contractors grumbled about the irrationality of the building’s design, I talked about the documentary film My Architect, created by Nathaniel Kahn, the architect’s son, and released the year I began working on the gallery. As we struggled with the stairwell lighting over many weeks, much to my surprise the head electrician made a point of watching the film and sought me out to discuss it. Soon thereafter I saw a renewed vigor in his efforts to re-energize the upgraded lighting without creating a new exposed connection in the stairwell.

It is the creative execution of many such details that makes or breaks a historic rehabilitation, and if the contractors aren’t on board, the job is that much more challenging.

Replacing “those windows” was by far the most detail-oriented aspect of the Kahn gallery rehabilitation. Recreating the mullions of the new double-paned window wall to within an eighth of an inch became a particular obsession that even Polshek recalls to this day. “The reality is, an eighth of an inch may not be seen but it will be felt,” Polshek told me on a recent afternoon over coffee in the West Village. “The process we established set a standard of excellence that carried forward to other modern restorations.”

“I was there when it was a radical intervention on the campus,” he continued, recounting how he was a student when the Kahn gallery opened. “Forty-something years later, I was teaching at Yale when I was approached about rehabilitating it. I said yes immediately. It was the perfect combination of factors—allowing an interweaving of art and craft, a respectable study of the past but not an appropriation. At the time people felt like there was no real use for the building. It had a mysterious genesis. To me it was part of our time that had to be renewed. It was necessary. But the effort to duplicate the details was incredible.”

AD Classics: Yale University Art Gallery / Louis Kahn

Read about Kahn's original design for the Yale University Art Gallery here.

Mid-Century Midlife Crisis

On a gorgeous fall day, my partner, Chad Smith and I toured the art galleries with Pam Franks. It felt like a homecoming. As students bustled in and out through the lobby, Franks and I reminisced about the array of changes we worked on together, from accessibility and climate control to circulation.

As important as the details are, it’s always the big picture that drives a project of this scope. And the big picture is best articulated by Franks: “The three-building complex, they all were originally built as galleries. So we had this incredible opportunity to recoup the institutional mission at the same time as expanding. With more space we could display collections that had never been seen.” She added, “It was really important to retain as much as was practical, but certainly to retain the spirit.”

Franks touches on an important philosophical construct of historic preservation that has evolved over time. It used to be that when something was replaced, it was intentionally made to look different to show that it was not part of the original. That approach gradually gave way to the idea that historic preservationists should go to heroic lengths to restore a building as closely as possible to its original materiality. But modernist preservation, with its technically failing architecture, pushed this notion beyond its workability.

It is this shift in preservation theory and practice that gave rise to DOCOMOMO, which stands for the documentation and conservation of the modern movement.  The organization began in Europe but has only been in existence in the US for about 25 years.

“We’re at an interesting point with modern architecture conservation,” Meredith Bzdak, an architectural historian who serves on the Board of Directors of DOCOMOMO, said in an interview. “Hard to believe but it’s still a developing field. It’s such a huge percentage of our building stock. You want to preserve the best, but there’s a lot of stuff to sift through on campuses as well as about half the building stock owned by the government. I would like to see more of what Yale did with less significant buildings. It’s an uphill battle.”

“When buildings are 40, 50 years old,” she continued, “they’ve been lived with, there’s been some work done that is piecemeal, but they aren’t old enough that anyone has taken a hard look at them. So all the systems need to be replaced and they’re not seen in the best light at that age.” She started laughing as her analogy unspooled: “They are middle-aged and not yet appreciated for their wisdom!”

Architecture critic James Russell, who wrote about the Yale art gallery rehabilitation for the New York Times, agrees. “Yale made an enormous commitment to a building that a lot of people didn’t like—but they do now that the renovation is done,” he told me. “There’s a lesson for others. I’m seeing a lot of ‘Brutalism is back’ articles. I’m not sure the general public has gone crazy yet. But when you see a sensitive redo, people realize it can be done. That’s the significance of the Kahn gallery rehabilitation.”

While on campus I visited the more recently re-opened Yale Center for British Art, one of the earliest Brutalist masterpieces by Kahn that sits across the street from the Yale Art Gallery. This restoration is also garnering rave reviews, and is arguably a more accomplished work, even though Kahn died of a heart attack in Penn Station before it was complete.

Located across the street from the Yale Art Gallery, Kahn’s Yale Center for British Art was fully restored last year. Image © Richard Caspole Located across the street from the Yale Art Gallery, Kahn’s Yale Center for British Art was fully restored last year. Image © Richard Caspole

Polshek told me about the day he found out Kahn died unexpectedly. He was dean of Columbia’s architecture school when he got a call asking him to escort Kahn’s wife Esther to the morgue so she could identify the body. “It was a macabre reintroduction to Lou.”

“I always had an affinity for preservation,” Polshek continued, recalling how he established preservation as a degree-granting program at Columbia’s architecture school, the first of its kind in the US. “It had been a certificate that was looked down upon. But it’s a validation of history; there’s a political edge to it. When I went to school, modernism was a religion. Everybody who was going to be an architect was going to be a great designer. Preservation was all about craft. But I believe architecture is a craft. Always new, always different isn’t always better.”

I couldn’t agree more.

Lloyd DesBrisay founded New York City-based DesBrisay & Smith Architects with Chad Smith in 2012. Prior to co-founding his firm, DesBrisay was at the Polshek Partnership (now Ennead Architect). Lisa Chamberlain, a writer and communications strategist, assisted with this article.

Yale University Art Gallery Renovation / Ennead Architects

Read more about Ennead Architects' renovation of all three gallery buildings here.

Author: Lloyd DesBrisay
Posted: January 19, 2018, 9:30 am

The plot in question has an area of 500.00 m2 and confronts the North and West with access roads, and at East and South with two private plots.

© João Morgado © João Morgado
  • Architects: Nelson Resende
  • Location: São João, Portugal
  • Architect In Charge: Nelson Resende
  • Area: 244.45 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: João Morgado
  • Structure: João Almeirante, Engenheiro Civil
  • Águas, Térmico, Acústico : João Almeirante, Engenheiro Civil
  • Instalações Eléctricas, Gás : Nuno Leite, Engenheiro Electrotécnico
  • Construction: Vários empreiteiros
© João Morgado © João Morgado

Text description provided by the architects. The plot in question has an area of 500.00 m2 and confronts the North and West with access roads, and at East and South with two private plots.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

Its location presents good conditions of solar exposure, just as the rectangular configuration allows to maintain a proportion able to host a program of typology type T3, as intended.

The project, framed by the legal constraints, namely the construction indexes, volumetries and dimensions, seeks to respond adequately to the program, developing for this purpose a two-story volumetry, with a program mainly of public use in the ground-floor and predominantly private use on the upper floor.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

On the ground floor are located the various spaces of service or support to the housing like the laundry or kitchen, along with the main access spaces, horizontal and vertical distribution, living and dinning room, a toilet and also a work space. As for the first floor, along with the introduction of vertical and horizontal distribution spaces, limited to a staircase and an atrium, there is a toilet and two bedrooms and a third bedroom with a cloakroom and a private toilet.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

In both the lower and upper floors, the main use spaces have outside support areas (esplanades to support the living room and kitchen, patio to support the laundry, balconies to support the bedrooms), integrated not only in the construction itself as in treated outdoor spaces with garden and fences.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

The garage space is also designed in a more flexible way, and can be suitable as a multipurpose room or space as it not only opens to the outside car access but also to the garden.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

openings and more controlled to the North, near the accesses, closing mainly the Est façade, tangent to pedestrian and car access space, and orienting the rooms and living room/kitchen essentially for West and at the lower floor also to South (the living room and the working space).

© João Morgado © João Morgado

Covered or semi-covered exterior spaces such as the balconies of the bedrooms or the living room/kitchen allow to enlarge the internal spaces and introduce moments of greater connection between inside and outside areas,

Floor Plan Floor Plan
Floor Plan Floor Plan

promoting the full use not only of the built spaces but also of the adjacent external spaces. The fence is made with a sheet of corten steel that allows to maintain a careful image and whose formal result is almost only the transposition of the constructive result, which also reigns in the way the housing is built and appears, raw and apparently stripped of any intention of seeking beauty beyond what the building can give.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

With regard to the finishing materials of the proposed construction, it is foreseen the use of a reinforced concrete structure, with some external facings in apparent concrete, and it is proposed to cover the lower floor with viroc panels, in the walls, both inside and outside, with a concrete floor and after the concrete strip between floors, the use of the etics system with plastered walls and painted in white on the outside and a plywood coating on the inside with a wooden floor.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

Quanto aos materiais de acabamento da construção proposta, prevê-se a utilização de uma estrutura de betão armado, com alguns paramentos exteriores em betão aparente, sendo que se propõe o revestimento do piso inferior com painéis viroc, quer pelo exterior como pelo interior, nas paredes, com um piso em microcimento e após a cinta de betão aparente entre pisos, a utilização do sistema capoto com paredes rebocadas e pintadas em branco pelo exterior e um revestimento com contraplacado de madeira pelo interior e um pavimento em soalho de madeira.

© João Morgado © João Morgado

This purposeful differentiation between floors helps to create distinct atmospheres, whether it is the common use space, more formal, neutral and simultaneously flexible, whether it is private spaces, warmer, more comfortable and closer to a more personal approach - despite of the different palette of materials, the way it’s materialized, however, confers an identity that assumes a certain formal austerity, seen almost as unpretentious design.

© João Morgado © João Morgado
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: January 19, 2018, 9:00 am

The principal architect of LA firm MorphosisThom Mayne (born January 19, 1944) was the recipient of the 2005 Pritzker Prize and the 2013 AIA Gold Medal, and is known for his experimental architectural forms, often applying them to significant institutional buildings such as the New York's Cooper Union building, the Emerson College in Los Angeles and the Caltrans District 7 Headquarters.

Emerson College Los Angeles. Image © Iwan Baan Emerson College Los Angeles. Image © Iwan Baan

The principal architect of LA firm MorphosisThom Mayne (born January 19, 1944) was the recipient of the 2005 Pritzker Prize and the 2013 AIA Gold Medal, and is known for his experimental architectural forms, often applying them to significant institutional buildings such as the New York's Cooper Union building, the Emerson College in Los Angeles and the Caltrans District 7 Headquarters.

Courtesy of Princeton University Lecture Series Courtesy of Princeton University Lecture Series

Mayne's experimental streak was visible early on in his career: in 1972, he was part of the group which founded the SCI-Arc school with the intention of developing a world-class independent architecture school along the lines of the Architectural Association in London or the Cooper Union in New York. Also in 1972, Mayne co-founded Morphosis architects; during the firm's early days many of their projects were small commissions for friends. He eventually received his Masters from Harvard University in 1978 and returned as the principal architect and lead designer of the firm, growing it into the internationally renowned practice it is today.

Caltrans District 7 Headquaters. Image © Liao Yusheng Caltrans District 7 Headquaters. Image © Liao Yusheng

Morphosis is known for their bold designs, striking a balance between sculptural and monolithic forms. In the jury's citation for his Pritzker Prize, his architecture was described as showing a commitment "throughout his career to create an original architecture, one that is truly representative of the unique, somewhat rootless, culture of Southern California."

Cooper Union Building. Image © Iwan Baan Cooper Union Building. Image © Iwan Baan

As such, Mayne is not afraid of challenging conventional notions of architecture, often courting controversy in the process. For example, his recent proposal for a 381-meter tall hotel in the small alpine town of Vals attracted significant criticism, even from the competition jury who publicly distanced themselves from the client's decision; anticipating the heated public reaction, Morphosis' own press release described Mayne as "The Bad Boy of Architecture."

Perot Museum. Image © Iwan Baan Perot Museum. Image © Iwan Baan

Throughout his career, Mayne has been heavily involved in education and has remained close to SCI-Arc, as well as teaching at Columbia University, Harvard University, Yale University and the Bartlett School of Architecture.

Bill & Melinda Gates Hall. Image © Roland Halbe Bill & Melinda Gates Hall. Image © Roland Halbe

Check out all of Mayne's completed works on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and our other coverage of Mayne below those:

Thom Mayne, Recipient of the 2013 AIA Gold Medal

The Indicator: When Architects Attack

Guy Horton dissects a feud between Thom Mayne and LA Times critic Christopher Hawthorne, analyzing how prominent architects like Mayne can respond for a better architectural culture.

Morphosis Architects Headline AIA's 2015 Technology In Architectural Practice Innovation Awards

Interview With Thom Mayne: "I Am a Pragmatic Idealist"

Talking With Thom

"Campus of the Digital Age": Cornell Tech Officially Debuts on Roosevelt Island in New York

VIDEO: Thom Mayne Talks the Cooper Union Building

Thom Mayne Completes Research on Houston's Urban Future

Archiculture Interviews: Thom Mayne

6 Architects Share What It's Like to Build in New York

The Berlage Archive: Thom Mayne (1996)

Author: Rory Stott
Posted: January 19, 2018, 8:00 am

Perkins+Will is creating a whole new world 62 miles northwest of Shanghai for the Suzhou Science & Technology Museum. Inspired by shan sui, the Chinese phrase for "mountain-water,” the complex lies at the foot of Lion Mountain and adjacent to Shishan Lake. The 600,000 square foot museum will be the focal point of a new cultural neighborhood in Shishan Park.

Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will

Perkins+Will is creating a whole new world 62 miles northwest of Shanghai for the Suzhou Science & Technology Museum. Inspired by shan sui, the Chinese phrase for "mountain-water,” the complex lies at the foot of Lion Mountain and adjacent to Shishan Lake. The 600,000 square foot museum will be the focal point of a new cultural neighborhood in Shishan Park.

Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will

The building itself emerges from the bottom of the mountain and folds back onto itself. With its metallic facades, the form resembles one of Suzhou’s most well-known exports, a silk scarf. The facades’ metal mesh skin controls daylighting and solar gains by transitioning from opaque to transparent. Inside, the museum features a three story atrium with an aquatic courtyard. On the third floor, Lion Mountain Terrace extends over the lake and frames Lion Mountain.

Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will
Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will

Complete with terraced landscapes, civic plazas, eco islands, and surrounding forest, the design is much more than just a museum. Many visitors will enter through Discovery Court, a sustainable plaza with permeable paving, bioswales and reflecting pools. On the lake, eco islands are connected by a walkway leading to the museum. The eco islands act as a filtration system for the lake and feature exhibits on water purification, storm water management and sustainable living. The heat island effect is mitigated by the building’s green roofs.

Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will
Courtesy of Perkins+Will Courtesy of Perkins+Will

The Suzhou Science & Technology Museum follows Perkins+Wills last civic and cultural project in China, internationally recognized Shanghai Natural History Museum which opened in 2015.

News via: Perkins+Wills.

Author: Lindsey Leardi
Posted: January 19, 2018, 6:00 am

Hotel Plesnik is a boutique family hotel found in the heart of a nature park, boasting a tradition spanning over eighty years. Its exceptional location at the end of a glacial valley offers an unforgettable view of the majestic peaks of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps. As Logarska Valley is claimed by many to be one of the most beautiful valleys in Europe, the amazing view of this natural wonder was the obvious choice for one of the leading motifs in the renovation of the hotel's wellness centre.

© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič
  • Architects: Enota
  • Location: Logar Valley, Logarska Dolina 9, 3335 Solčava, Slovenia
  • Architect In Charge: Wellness Plesnik
  • Area: 560.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Miran Kambič
  • Project Team: Dean Lah, Milan Tomac, Nuša Završnik Šilec, Peter Sovinc
  • Structural Engineering: Elea iC
  • Electrical Installations: Elin
  • Mechanical Services: Nom biro
  • Pool Technology: Svilene linije & Handling
© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič

Hotel Plesnik is a boutique family hotel found in the heart of a nature park, boasting a tradition spanning over eighty years. Its exceptional location at the end of a glacial valley offers an unforgettable view of the majestic peaks of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps. As Logarska Valley is claimed by many to be one of the most beautiful valleys in Europe, the amazing view of this natural wonder was the obvious choice for one of the leading motifs in the renovation of the hotel's wellness centre.

© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič
New Floor Plan New Floor Plan
© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič

Much of the space of the pre-existing wellness centre in the partially cut-in basement of the building was originally taken up by a small, organically shaped pool which opened onto a tanning deck directly in front of the building. To recover the space needed for new programmes, the pool was in part replaced by a large whirlpool, while a section of the former pool shell closer to the view of the valley was repurposed as a sunken circular resting area featuring a fireplace. The sun deck has been extended with a natural swimming pool, which makes up for and expands on the deleted interior water surface, while the reflection in the water further accents the beautiful view.

© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič

Despite natural filtration by means of aquatic plants, the new pool is unequivocally rectilinear in shape and as such designed to be a continuation of the building rather than the surrounding landscape. Referencing the interior resting area with the fireplace, a relaxation area with a fire ring has been placed in the middle of the water surface outside. Using the space, the visitors of the new wellness centre witness a never-ending dialogue between water and fire, two basic natural elements accentuating the incredible backdrop of the surrounding hill range.

© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič
New Elevation New Elevation
© Miran Kambič © Miran Kambič

The entire ambient of Wellness Plesnik is designed using local materials exclusively. The undulating interior walls were necessitated by the markedly awkward and heterogenous construction design of the existing space. A relaxed placement of interior divides envelops and conceals all the irregularities and forms a fluid space terminating in the valley itself. The pebble-laid walls of the space physically transition also into the exterior and optically divide the sun deck into three parts: the sauna section, the section with the central wellness space, and the entrance portal. The facade between the divisions is fully encased in glass and replaces the former arch-head windows. The enlargement of the facade openings further connects the interior space of the wellness centre with the picturesque exterior and reduces its presence in the space despite the actual expansion of the basic volume. With the extension having been purified of all distinct architectural elements, it now belongs with the surrounding terrain rather than with the master building.

Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: January 19, 2018, 5:00 am

Most owners use their holiday homes for only a couple of weeks a year, leaving them as empty objects in their respective surrounding for the rest of the time. This is, however, not the case with House in Tschengla, which has become a fully-fledged second home for its owners. Located a mere 30 minute drive from their flat in the Western Austrian town of Feldkirch, it allows them to live in two worlds, between the lively density of a town and the vast solitude of the mountains.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter
  • Statics: Mader Flatz, Bregenz
  • Construction Supervision: Jürgen Haller, Mellau
© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

Text description provided by the architects. Most owners use their holiday homes for only a couple of weeks a year, leaving them as empty objects in their respective surrounding for the rest of the time. This is, however, not the case with House in Tschengla, which has become a fully-fledged second home for its owners. Located a mere 30 minute drive from their flat in the Western Austrian town of Feldkirch, it allows them to live in two worlds, between the lively density of a town and the vast solitude of the mountains.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

The varied, mostly untouched nature with its alpine flora and breath-taking views of the surrounding mountains make Tschengla, a plateau high above the village of Bürserberg, a very special place. With respect to this unique setting, we decided to place the newly built House on Tschengla into this precious scenery like a solitaire. Its outlines are an unmistakable reference to the way farmhouses have been built in Alpine regions ever since the first settlements: a simple, well-structured wooden building on a solid plinth, its gable looking down the valley. Works around the house were kept to a minimum to leave the new building surrounded by untouched alpine pastures.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter
Floor Plans Floor Plans
© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

A little square cut into the hillside at the rear face opens the house to the street. The covered entrance leads inside, where a corridor that also houses the kitchen runs through the ground floor. This is the casual meeting place, the heart of the house. A small step up is the dining area with corner seating and a big table facing south, its lower ceiling making it even more inviting and intimate. A panoramic window stretches all along this side of the house, revealing the impressive mountain views. The wooden corner bench stretches further along the walls all the way to the fireplace, serving also as a bookshelf and fireside bench. From here, a solid stairwell leads up to the attic rooms, opening up the rather small living area and giving it a surprisingly open and generous air. The Schopf, a kind of porch or closed veranda typical for the region, connects the kitchen/corridor to the west side of the house with outdoor seating, fountain and a small herb garden.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

From the kitchen, the small staircase, slightly spiralled between two narrow walls, leads up to the attic floor. In contrast to the lower floor, this part of the house is more a place for retreat. The roof reaches low and houses two bedrooms, a bathroom, a small hallway with a workplace and an extra room including a little library. The windows sit low on the level of the cullis with the daylight falling far into the rooms, creating a cosy, intimate atmosphere.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter
Sections Sections
© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

The diversity of ambiences in these rooms – some with high, some with low ceilings, some wide, some small – is further enhanced by the use of simple, yet atmospheric materials. Untreated spruce and ash, grey plasterwork und rough stone give this house a special and natural air. A second home in the mountains; far from, yet close to the hustle and bustle of life in town. A sacred space for this little family.

© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: January 19, 2018, 3:00 am

This new residential complex is located on Pasteurstrasse, a street in the quiet Bötzowkiez area of Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg. Realized as a joint venture between its future residents, this project comprises of fifty-one units spread across four separate buildings. The complex stands on a site previously occupied by a freestanding supermarket, which has been seamlessly integrated into the ground floor of the building facing the street.

© Simon Menges © Simon Menges
  • Architects: Zanderroth Architekten
  • Location: Pasteurstraße 19-25, Berlin, Germany
  • Team: Christian Roth, Sascha Zander, Michael Spieler, Anne Kaiser, Tilman Heiring, Jan Conradi, Nils Schülke
  • Area: 14.667 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Simon Menges
  • Load Bearing Structure: Ingenieurbüro Andreas Leipold, Berlin
  • Building Technology : Ingenieurbüro Lüttgens, Berlin
  • Landscape Architecture: Hager & Patner, Berlin
© Simon Menges © Simon Menges

Text description provided by the architects. This new residential complex is located on Pasteurstrasse, a street in the quiet Bötzowkiez area of Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg. Realized as a joint venture between its future residents, this project comprises of fifty-one units spread across four separate buildings. The complex stands on a site previously occupied by a freestanding supermarket, which has been seamlessly integrated into the ground floor of the building facing the street.

© Simon Menges © Simon Menges
Section Section
© Simon Menges © Simon Menges

 The project thereby closes a gap in the block, engaging in a retroactive densification of the inner city—but also, above all, repairing a damaged urban fabric. A contextual approach was taken to better integrate the complex with its surroundings: the existing neighborhood, in effect, was simply built further, with the complex adopting the building lines, materials, and colors of its context. The street-facing part of the complex spans across four parcels, thus forming a continuation of the street fronts of the adjacent historical buildings. Behind it are three “garden houses,” which are grouped around a communal courtyard that has been placed on the roof of the ground-floor supermarket. On both sides of the three garden houses, four smaller courtyards are created along the borders with the surrounding properties. Resulting in a wholly new spatial arrangement, a sequence of five courtyards that vary in size, form, and use. The building blends into its neighborhood, despite its use of modern materials. 

© Simon Menges © Simon Menges

The multilayered façade of the streetfacing building, thanks to its translucent appearance, creates varied, constantly changing surface effects that can be appreciated from both inside and out. The folding shutter elements, made of anodized expanded metal, play with the residents’ perception of their surroundings and work with seemingly irreconcilable contradictions. Depending on the time of day, the lighting situation, and sunlight exposure, the building appears somewhere between open and closed, light and heavy, bright and dark. In this way, it creates a connection between interior and exterior while also providing the privacy necessary for those spaces facing the street. Within the interior of the block, the boundaries between inside and outside are similarly blurred. The continuous balconies with their exposed-concrete parapets seem to thrust outwards from the buildings, creating a fluid transition between domestic and outdoor space. The courtyards provide green living spaces in the middle of the big city. 

© Simon Menges © Simon Menges
Plan Plan
© Simon Menges © Simon Menges

The different residential buildings feature a variety of living types and apartment sizes. Their main feature is the flexibility within which their floor plans can be subdivided, thereby accommodating the individual needs of the inhabitants. The simple structure of the buildings leaves plenty of leeway for residents to design the spaces themselves before moving in, and also provides the opportunity to adjust the apartments to changing uses and needs later on. The units range from two- to five-bedroom apartments. Starting at 60 square meters and going up to 200 square meters, the units offer generous proportions and occasionally span two, even three, floors. Floor-to-ceiling windows mean well-lit rooms and a connection to the outside. Each apartment also includes access to a private outdoor area (be it a balcony, a terrace, a garden, or a rooftop garden).

© Simon Menges © Simon Menges
Author: Fernanda Castro
Posted: January 19, 2018, 2:00 am

ReGEN House - a house where every generation can live together.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo
  • Architects: EKAR
  • Location: Khwaeng Bang Bumru, Thailand
  • Architect: Groundsplay Studio
  • Interior Architect: Define Studio
  • Landscape Architect: Groundsplay Studio
  • Area: 1726.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Chalermwat Wongchompoo
  • Structural Engineer: Sommuek Apiraksa
  • Owner: Pankwan Hudthagosol
  • Land Area: 1064 m2

Text description provided by the architects. ReGEN House - a house where every generation can live together.

Beginning:
After living with his parents until the time he has his own family, our client moved out to his own house located opposite his parents’. The very first intention of our client was to renovate the existing house to be suitable for his first-born daughter - Meena. However, after the completion of architectural drawing, our client changed his mind. From his experience, it is not pleasing when it comes to living apart from his parents. Being a new parent makes our client become truly thinking about his daughter and her future. Therefore, he bought another land opposite his house and next to his parent’s house, with an effort to create a place where he can live with his child Meena till the time when she has her own family.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo
Diagram Diagram

Traditional & Modern Context :
Long before Bangkok established, Thai people live in a big family which consists of grandparents, father, mother and children (and sometimes including uncle and aunt). The way of Thai’s life has influenced on the architectural design of Thailand. A traditional Thai house, in general, is composed of a variety of small detached-houses in which each small family lives, and a patio in a middle of the houses, where connects each family together. The house sits on poles which creates a high open space under the house, allowing good wind flow to pass through and lowering the temperature inside. In addition, protecting the dwellers from flood and wild animals. Therefore, this ground floor is mainly for parking and storage. While the residential area is on the first floor of the house where life starts. The attempt is to enhance living quality as well as the family relationship; meanwhile, individuals still have their own private space.          

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo

Nonetheless, the modern context is full of complexity creating complication in Thai people’s life. Land prices soar in capital forcing people to live apart from their family. Modern people tend to move into micro-apartments nearby their workplaces or too small detached-houses outside the city where the land prices are still affordable. The question is whether or not it is possible that we could create a house which brings back the comfort of traditional Thai houses to the modern context.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo
Section Concept Section Concept

Perception of The Family Land & The Architectural Execution:
The land is located on the corner of a road, and next to the house of client’s parents where he grew up. With an area of 640 square meters, the architect embraces the concept of traditional Thai architecture to the planning to maximize this limited area. By creating L-shape building and lifting all residential spaces to the upper floors; leaving ground floor free for storage and parking area of ten cars. The wall between the parents’ house and the new one is eliminated and filled with a big new garden along the existing garden of parents’ house to create consistency of space.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo

Regarding client’s wish, the architects divided the floor planning of four-storey house. The second floor is meant for the client’s family, while the third floor is for his daughter’s future family. Hence, in order to gather everyone in the family (and his daughter’s future family) together, the first floor is a focal point. On this floor, there are an entertainment room and a grand patio which become the common area for the client’s family (and also the future family). Furthermore, this floor is inspired by a traditional ground level in which natural elements are closely surrounded. Ranging from the swimming pool on the same floor which reflects a riverside sensation to the elevated yard across the swimming pool. The gap between the swimming pool and the elevated yard allows a tree from the ground floor to grow through. Also, allowing sunlight to stream in a glass pavilion (gardening pavilion) underneath. On the grand patio, users’ eyesight will be led to the swimming pool, the elevated yard, the top of the tree (grew on the ground floor), the existing garden of parents’ house, and to the parents’ house, respectively.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo
© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo

The intention is to make our client feel close to their parents. As well as to lay down watching Meena running around on this grand patio, like on a real ground. East side of the land is opposite the eight-storey economic apartment. Therefore, the architects conceal the house on this side, in order to block the unpleasant view as well as to protect the residents from prying eyes, by providing windows or voids at the minimum number. Back to the ground floor, there is a main entrance on the east side which is made of solid wood. While on the first floor, on the same side, there are floor-to-ceiling wooden-grill window pivots which can be opened to allows ventilation and can be closed when privacy is in need. In terms of material selection, each floor of the ReGEN House features different materials, such as wood, stone-texture coated wall and stone-like tiles. This material combination creates a uniqueness to the facade which still fits into the surrounding context.

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo © Chalermwat Wongchompoo

Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: January 19, 2018, 12:00 am

Project background
The project is located at Sha Cheng, the center of Hualai city in the province he Hebei, China. 120km way from Beijing and at an altitude of 550m above sea level, the site is at a place where there are great mountains, nice air and extremely bright sun.  The place is also famous its frequent and heavy wind.  

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu
  • Architects: Interval Architects
  • Location: Huailai, Zhangjiakou, Hebei, China
  • Architect In Charge: Oscar Ko, Yunduan Gu
  • Design Team: Oscar Ko, Yunduan Gu, Wentian Liu Jin Huang, Hanqi Fang, Yujie Gong, Liuhui Qi, Hang Dong, Xin Chen, Mim Kong, Mazhiyan Si, Shiyu Yang
  • Lighting Design: MIAO Hailin
  • Client: Raffles Kindergarten
  • Local Design Institute: Zhangjiakou Zhongtian Architectural Design Limited
  • Area: 10594.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Yunduan Gu
© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

Project background
The project is located at Sha Cheng, the center of Hualai city in the province he Hebei, China. 120km way from Beijing and at an altitude of 550m above sea level, the site is at a place where there are great mountains, nice air and extremely bright sun.  The place is also famous its frequent and heavy wind.  

Instead of a single kindergarten, the project is actually a kindergarten complex consists of a kindergarten, a education center for children and residence for teachers.  

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

Complex programming and spatial organization
The design began with the intention to put together the above-mentioned programs into a unity while maintaining its operational independence.  We introduced a continuous volume that meanders on the site to divide up the site into various zones specific for different functions.

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

The education center, which are open to the general public, were put on the north of the site to allow maximum public access to the main street with heavy traffic.  Main entrances of the kindergarten were put on the east side of the site, facing a minor street with less traffic.  Residences were put on the west side of the site in order to receive the best sunlight.

Plan Plan

The building masses in brown houses programs with less publicness such as classrooms, residences, offices and utility spaces while the building masses in white house public spaces that connects other programs.  With the interwoven volumes of the brown and the white building masses, courtyards at various scales were inserted into the building at various locations such as entrance courtyard, delivery back court, side courts and etc.

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

These courts performs as layers of buffer zones that mediates between the exterior and the interior spaces and established spatial sequence entering the building.  Pragmatically speaking they also provided outdoor playground for kids in the summer and also allowed sufficient natural lighting into the rooms. 

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

Blurring of circulation and communication spaces
Since the project is located in northern China, it is particularly important to address the issue of playground spaces for kids during the winter season.Instead of providing an outdoor playground, we proposed a 6-meter-wide-and-80-meter-long linear space that performs as an indoor multi-purpose playground for children and teachers.

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

Instead of providing an outdoor playground, we proposed a 6-meter-wide-and-80-meter-long linear space that performs as an indoor multi-purpose playground for children and teachers.The conventional idea of small corridors were eliminated and substituted for a communal space that encourages communication and visual and audio connections.

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu
© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu

This linear multi-purpose playground connects all the classrooms in the kindergarten and up across all three levels through atriums.  Kids can perform all kinds of activities ranging from badminton, dancing to riding bicycles.  Along the two sides of this big linear playground, niches were created to provide space for kids to crawl, sit or read.  

© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu
© Yunduan Gu © Yunduan Gu
Author: 舒岳康 - SHU Yuekang
Posted: January 18, 2018, 10:00 pm

Knock Knock Heon is located on the border of Seoul, surrounded by an exceptional landscape made up by a forest in the foreground and the famous Bukhansan in the background. Both the architect and the client agreed that the relationship to the mountain would be the guiding line of the project. The building shape is the result of the combination of two conditions. The first one is the relation to the mountain and the second one is the shape of the plot. In order to reduce the density of the house, the spaces are articulated between two Madang (void between the constructions).

© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park
  • Architects: guga Urban Architecture
  • Location: 계동길, South Korea
  • Lead Architects: Junggoo Cho
  • Design Team: Jiyoung Joe, Soomin Yang, Jinkyeong Park
  • Area: 175.02 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Young-chae Park
  • Structural Engineer: TheKuJo Engineering
  • Supervision: guga Urban Architecture
  • Award: Korean Architecture Awards 2017, Bronze prize / Korea Institute of Registered Architects
© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park

Text description provided by the architects. Knock Knock Heon is located on the border of Seoul, surrounded by an exceptional landscape made up by a forest in the foreground and the famous Bukhansan in the background. Both the architect and the client agreed that the relationship to the mountain would be the guiding line of the project. The building shape is the result of the combination of two conditions. The first one is the relation to the mountain and the second one is the shape of the plot. In order to reduce the density of the house, the spaces are articulated between two Madang (void between the constructions).

© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park
Lower Floor Plan Lower Floor Plan
© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park

The first one is the residual spaces generated by the relationship between the serrated typology and the Damjang (Korean boundary walls) taking the form of a fragmented courtyard and reinforcing the visual connection from the house to the mountain. The second Madang is located on the backside of the house. More introverted, the sunken Madang is like a patio bringing light and air to the basement spaces. The house is divided into two parts. The level difference between the house floor levels and the road were carefully calculated in order to find the balance. Namely: A constant visual connection to the mountain, the penetration of the light into the inferior storey and an acceptable gap between the level of the road and the entrance.

© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park
Cross Section Cross Section
© Young-chae Park © Young-chae Park

The inferior storey was designed like a bedrock supporting the Hanok. Fulfilling all the functional need of the house, the basement could be used as an autonomous part. As the Hanok is slightly detached from the ground, the light and the air can penetrate into the interior spaces through a clearstory window. Organized around the sunken Madang (patio), the cryptic spaces are bright and comfortable, and does not give the feeling to be in a basement. In order to create a fluid and comfortable space, an anti-chamber was needed. Carefully positioned, the vestibule and staircases are essential parts of the house, not only they act like as generous thresholds between the two floors but also it allows the superior spaces to focus on its relationship with the mountain.

Courtesy of guga Urban Architecture Courtesy of guga Urban Architecture

The evolution of the structure material highlights the soft transition between the inferior to the superior part. Indeed, starting from the concrete of the basement, we are passing through the brick walls of the interconnected staircase to the wooden structure of the Hanok. The traditional Numaru (a space with a wooden floor that has a panoramic view) inspired the dining room. In this house, the Numaru lays as an object on a concrete plate. This project shows the capacity of the evolution of the traditional Korean Hanok. Thanks to this new shape and the new technologies, this house was able to free some architectural and mechanical constraints from the traditional Hanok and produce more comfort, light and space. Knock Knock Heon fits the need of the modern society but in the same allow a coexistence between the traditional and modern lifestyles.

Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: January 18, 2018, 8:00 pm

The 3-story mixed use building occupies a 1,500 square-meter footprint gathering function for Ice Factory on ground floor, Office on second floor, and Residence on the top floor.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi
  • Architects: TA-CHA Design
  • Location: Nonthaburi, Mueang Nonthaburi District, Nonthaburi, Thailand
  • Lead Architects: Waranyu Makarabhirom, Sonthad Srisang
  • Interior Design: TA-CHA Design
  • Landscape Design: TA-CHA Design
  • Area: 3000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: BeerSingnoi
  • Main Contractor: Thaweemongkol Construction (2000)
  • Client: Premium Ice

Text description provided by the architects. The 3-story mixed use building occupies a 1,500 square-meter footprint gathering function for Ice Factory on ground floor, Office on second floor, and Residence on the top floor.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Chapter one – the Façade and Ice Factory
Snow flake always contains ice crystals joining together in a hexagonal shape.” These ideas of backward ice manufacturing process (liquid to solid objects) as a metaphor to design building enclosure. The façade pattern is solid steel plate on one corner and perforated steel sheet on the rest interpreting ice making procedure. The building skin catches the sun variously in different time during the day so it exaggerates worker’s experience relying on relationship to the building ie on second and third floors or inside and outside rooms. The building envelope gathers natural ventilation for public spaces plus providing shade and comfort.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Chapter two – the Office
Beginning with curiosity “what kind of workplace is ideal for us” leads to the next question “how to design to meet staff’s satisfaction” A passive design is our primary strategy to answer queries above.
The benefit of sufficient natural light is that staff is able to work efficiently and effectively. The translucent roof introduces natural light into common area for visitors as well as office space for staff plus climbing plants act as natural partition to comfort people.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Building façade perforation is the key to allow air flow throughout office area along with designated floor plan to reinforce natural air ventilation. Green area in the middle of common space is to properly differentiate between visitors and staff so workplace remain private zone since initial client brief says that most of staff is accountant and privacy and security is required so this department should be quiet area and feel peaceful. To support passive design strategy, each furniture and floor is made of reused timber provided by owner.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Chapter three – Residence
According to current owner’s residence which is home office, working on lower level and living on upper level all day long is their life style. In contrast, we do not make their lifestyle change instead we design space to encourage them to be happy at work and live better by communicating and interacting with workplace below thru open space.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Besides, green area for residence from original client idea gives our design process a guideline to gain maximum benefit from green space limitation but still maintain natural ventilation and the amount and quality of daylight. During the rainy season, landscape remains accessible and usable.

© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi
Section Section
© BeerSingnoi © BeerSingnoi

Similar to the rest of the floors, third level floor plate maintain the idea behind concept of air flow which to encourage resident away from air conditioning as necessary. Again, to support passive design approach, reused water from ice manufacturing process on ground floor is pumped for automatic landscape irrigation system. In addition, 60% of wooden element on residential area is reused timber to maximize resource utilization and construction.

Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: January 18, 2018, 7:00 pm

This project is on display at the Center-Gai, located at the intersection of Inokashira-street and the Yumeji-street. The surroundings bristle with commercial buildings holding signboards.

© Nacasa & Partners © Nacasa & Partners
© Imada Photo Service © Imada Photo Service

Text description provided by the architects. This project is on display at the Center-Gai, located at the intersection of Inokashira-street and the Yumeji-street. The surroundings bristle with commercial buildings holding signboards.

© Nacasa & Partners © Nacasa & Partners

Our proposal is to visualize every floor as a volume in which through its full glazing façade, pedestrians can perceive the inner-life from the street. In this way, they recognize the building not from the signage but from the volume of the building. We produce diversity by maximizing the rental spaces through commanding the sky factor.

Elevations Elevations

External shaft equipment allows 100% rentable floor area ratio to preserve economic efficiency, and we developed a sashless, insulated glazing, fire preventing, steel curtain wall on the surface to mimic the appearance of glass in each floor as layers.

© Hata Taku © Hata Taku
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: January 18, 2018, 5:00 pm