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Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 - 12th AnnualMay 19, 2017, 1:00pmSan Mateo County Event CenterMaker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It’s a place where people of all ages and backgrounds gather together to show what they are making, and share what they are learning.

Maker Faire Bay Area - 12th Annual
May 19-21
FRIDAY@MakerFaire: 1pm - 5pm special access preview day

Saturday (10AM-7PM) and Sunday (10AM -6PM)
San Mateo Event Center, San Mateo, CA

Call for Makers is taking applications NOW
makerfaire.com/bay-area/call-for-makers/

Tickets for Maker Faire Bay Area will go be on sale shortly - sign up for the Faire newsletter to be notified. Don't miss Early Bird prices (best deal rates!)
makerfaire.com/newsletter/

Maker Faire celebrated 191+ Faires in 2016 in 38 Countries. The 11th annual Maker Faire Bay Area welcomed some 1,200 makers and 145,000 attendees. World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in seven years to 950+ makers and 95,000 attendees.
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Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 - 12th Annual

5 months ago

ArchDaily

ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwide

In many cities, rivers play an integral part in the formation of a local landscape and urban identity, contributing to economics, transport, and recreation, amongst other things. Unearthing the city's rivers to create new leisure spaces is one urban solution that is widely adopted by several cities around the world, in order to capitalize on the existing waterscape. In five years, the capital of South Korea resurrected its main river, the Cheonggyecheon, which had been buried under express streets and viaducts, restoring a sense of peace, green space, and national history to the city. Milan followed the same path: not long ago, the mayor of the Italian city Giuseppe Sala proposed reopening the navigable canals of Navigli for the public to interact with. 

Escritório curitibano propõe reabertura de alguns trechos dos rios Ivo e Belém para ajudar a transformar a cidade com mais espaços de lazer e descanso. Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Escritório curitibano propõe reabertura de alguns trechos dos rios Ivo e Belém para ajudar a transformar a cidade com mais espaços de lazer e descanso. Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

In many cities, rivers play an integral part in the formation of a local landscape and urban identity, contributing to economics, transport, and recreation, amongst other things. Unearthing the city's rivers to create new leisure spaces is one urban solution that is widely adopted by several cities around the world, in order to capitalize on the existing waterscape. In five years, the capital of South Korea resurrected its main river, the Cheonggyecheon, which had been buried under express streets and viaducts, restoring a sense of peace, green space, and national history to the city. Milan followed the same path: not long ago, the mayor of the Italian city Giuseppe Sala proposed reopening the navigable canals of Navigli for the public to interact with. 

And now the Architectural Office in Curitiba Solo Arquitetos suggests that Curitiba join the movement, reopening channeled stretches of the Belem and Ivo rivers, in the center of the city. The project was envisioned for the 2017 Architecture Exhibition for Curitiba, which brings together various proposals to rethink the city.

Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

“The city can take other paths. The spaces can be occupied in different ways", explain the architects involved in the project. "The rivers are seen as a problem, but we see in the reopening the chance to takes up again the relationship of the citizen with the river, bringing more vitality to the degraded center area." 

Architects who signed the project are Arthur Felipe Brizola, Gabriel Zem Schneider, João Gabriel Cordeiro Küster and Thiago Augustus Prenholato Alves, together with the students Eduardo Sanches Salsamendi, Mariana Resende Sutil de Oliveira, Kauana Perdigão, Lucas Holmes, Paola Bucci Leal, Nágila Fernanda Hachmann, Larissa Angela Pereira da Silva, Jessica Tiemi Ouchi, Rafael Santos Ferraz, Franco Luiz Faust and Lucas Aguillera. 

Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

The architects emphasize that additional technical studies are still necessary for the possible implementation of the rediscovery of the Curitiba rivers, but they point out that in the chosen stretches could be installed areas of swimming, canoeing, multi-sports court, a skating rink, stage, gardens, and bleachers. 

Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

The Belém river is the most emblematic of Curitiba, not only because of its historical importance in the emergence of the city but also because it is a strictly urban river, with source and mouth within the perimeter of the city. Ivo is an important tributary of the first, crossing crucial areas of the city. 

The architects point out at least six different ways of interacting the river with the rest of the city, which can coexist along the Center, and can be with access stairs, grandstand mode, only with ciliary vegetation and hybrid models, as shown in the figure below. 

Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

The studied stretches for the reopening of the Belem and Ivo rivers are at Mariano Torres and Vicente Machado Avenue. Both are extremely polluted, according to an assessment by the Environmental Institute of Paraná. Therefore, before the rivers were even unearthed, the de-pollution of both would have to be planned. 

Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus
Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus Imagem: Solo Arquitetos/Expo 2017/Divulgação. Image Cortesia de Gazeta do Povo / Haus

News via: Gazeta do Povo / Haus.

Author: Luan Galani
Posted: August 20, 2017, 4:00 pm

The IAAC (Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia) has developed a series of advanced materials and systems for air conditioning and passive ventilation, allowing homes to reduce interior temperatures up to 5 degrees lower while saving the electricity consumption caused by the traditional air-conditioning. The systems are made from long-lifespan materials, which lower the costs of maintenance in the long-term and can be used as low-cost alternative building technologies. 

Cortesía de IAAC Cortesía de IAAC

The IAAC (Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia) has developed a series of advanced materials and systems for air conditioning and passive ventilation, allowing homes to reduce interior temperatures up to 5 degrees lower while saving the electricity consumption caused by the traditional air-conditioning. The systems are made from long-lifespan materials, which lower the costs of maintenance in the long-term and can be used as low-cost alternative building technologies. 

The projects highlighted are the Breathing Skin, Hydroceramics, Hydromembrane, Morphluid and Soft Robotics - all developed by students of the IAAC's Digital Matter Intelligent Constructions (conducted by Areti Markopoulou). The passive air-conditioning of spaces is investigated using a combination of new materials that mimic organic processes, adaptive structures and Robotics that help regulate temperature and create sustainable micro climates. 

Facades and light structures like Hydroceramics, Breathing Skin or Hydromembrane have been developed by the IAAC during recent years. By creating a series of systems that act like a second skin in buildings, IAAC transforms a building’s thermoregulation to imitate the human body  -transpiring water to regulate the temperature. 

Hydroceramics is a façade system made of clay and hydrogel panels capable of cooling building interiors up to 5 degrees. Hydrogel capsules have the capacity to absorb up to 500 times their own weight in water to create a construction system that "breathes" through evaporation and perspiration. 

Breathing Skin. Image Cortesía de IAAC Breathing Skin. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Unlike Hydroceramics, parallel inventions Hydromembrane and Breathing Skin are based on compounds made with fine membranes and intelligent fabrics for buildings that act as a second "respiratory" skin for constructions capable of self-regulating the humidity and climate of indoor and outdoor spaces.

Each system uses materials that have a high capacity of water absorption, which is later released by evaporation - creating a cooling effect in warm environments. As an example, Breathing Skin absorbs up to 300 times its volume in water in a relatively short period of time thanks to the presence of superabsorbent polymer called sodium polyacrylate.

IAAC has also designed more alternatives that focus on structures and applied robotics in the new “bioclimatic architecture”. Morphluid or Soft Robotics (SORO) are created as passive shading systems using "live roofs" that regulate the amount of light and heat entering the spaces.

Morphluid. Image Cortesía de IAAC Morphluid. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Soft Robotics is a lightweight and sensitive robotic shading device that attempts to create microclimate by controlling sunlight, ventilation and temperature to humidify the atmosphere. This robotic prototype adopts different sizes and shapes as the artificial "sunflowers" that project shade the moment its integrated liquid element is evaporated by the heat of the sun.

Morphluid is also based on the transition of liquids as an activator that modulates the roof and adjusts the environment by means of shading. Morphluid integrates two water tanks into a movable structure (a roof, a window) that tilts when the water in one of the tanks evaporates, allowing shade to continuously project and refresh the environment.

Hydromembrane. Image Cortesía de IAAC Hydromembrane. Image Cortesía de IAAC

The IAAC academic director and project manager, Areti Markopoulou, highlights "the potential of advanced systems and materials to help us have the most pleasant temperature in our homes through more sustainable buildings that breathe and behave the living things and interact with their environment." Markopoulou Also highlighted the importance of this innovation to energy saving, since "passive air-conditioning materials and systems are based on principles of physics such as evaporation to cool spaces."

To learn more about each project, check out the gallery below:

Breathing Skin

Breathing Skin. Image Cortesía de IAAC Breathing Skin. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Soft Robotics (SoRo)

SoRo. Image Cortesía de IAAC SoRo. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Morphluid

Hydroceramic

Hydroceramic. Image Cortesía de IAAC Hydroceramic. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Hydromembrane

Hydromembrane. Image Cortesía de IAAC Hydromembrane. Image Cortesía de IAAC

Author: IAAC
Posted: August 20, 2017, 2:00 pm

With the idea of creating an oasis in the middle of the woods, the Casa Concreto project is born. Where the context of the house becomes the perfect green scenario to show off the concrete’s grey tones that, when in touch with nature, ages in an artistic way.

© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas
  • Architects: Grupo MM
  • Location: Ciudad López Mateos, Mexico
  • Collaborators: Venancio Torrijos
  • Area: 400.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Iván Casillas
© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas

From the architect. With the idea of creating an oasis in the middle of the woods, the Casa Concreto project is born. Where the context of the house becomes the perfect green scenario to show off the concrete’s grey tones that, when in touch with nature, ages in an artistic way.

© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas
Ground floor plan Ground floor plan
© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas
First floor plan First floor plan
© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas

A private access gives place to the first level that, in a semi-open floor plan, the public areas are located. The three rooms are in the second level. One of them has an independent access with a separate staircase.

© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas

The vegetation surrounding the house is integrated playfully in the interiors with patios, natural light entries and floor to ceiling windows. The finishes and lighting design also play an important role with grey and brown tones in flooring and wood work. These create a warm and cozy ambiance even with the coldness of the concrete.

© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas
Sections Sections
© Iván Casillas © Iván Casillas
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: August 20, 2017, 1:00 pm

Due to its ability to be shaped into complex forms and the diversity of textures that it can offer, concrete is one of the favorite materials of many architects, who appreciate its capacity to help them realize their designs. For this reason, for this week's Photos of the Week we have selected 20 images that highlight the beauty and expressiveness of this material. Read on to see a selection of renowned photographers such as Brigida GonzálezBruno Candiotto, Élena Marini Silvestri, and Raphael Olivier.

Due to its ability to be shaped into complex forms and the diversity of textures that it can offer, concrete is one of the favorite materials of many architects, who appreciate its capacity to help them realize their designs. For this reason, for this week's Photos of the Week we have selected 20 images that highlight the beauty and expressiveness of this material. Read on to see a selection of renowned photographers such as Brigida GonzálezBruno Candiotto, Élena Marini Silvestri, and Raphael Olivier.

Xia Zhi

Beijing No.4 High School Fangshan Campus / OPEN Architecture

© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi

Daniela Mac Adden

S+J House / Luciano Kruk 

© Daniela Mac Adden © Daniela Mac Adden

Élena Marini Silvestri

Oaxaca's Historical Archive Building / Mendaro Arquitectos

© Élena Marini Silvestri © Élena Marini Silvestri

Laurian Ghinitoiu

Pilgrimage Church / Gottfried Böhm

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Brigida González

E20 Private Residence / STEIMLE ARCHITEKTEN BDA

© Brigida González © Brigida González

Ivan Brodey

Løren Metro Station / Arne Henriksen Arkitekter + MDH Arkitekter

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey

Daniela Mac Adden

S+J House / Luciano Kruk

© Daniela Mac Adden © Daniela Mac Adden

Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Sambade House / spaceworkers

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Bruno Candiotto

Workshop House / PAX.ARQ

© Bruno Candiotto © Bruno Candiotto

Lorena Darquea

Acolhúas House / SPRB arquitectos

© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea

Brigida González

Greiner Headquarter / f m b architekten

© Brigida González © Brigida González

Raphael Olivier

Neo-Brutalist Revival / Raphael Olivier

© Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier

Carlos Patrón

Gabriela House / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual 

© Carlos Patrón © Carlos Patrón

Élena Marini Silvestri

Oaxaca's Historical Archive Building / Mendaro Arquitectos

© Élena Marini Silvestri © Élena Marini Silvestri

Raphael Olivier

Neo-Brutalist Revival / Raphael Olivier

© Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier

Ivan Brodey

Løren Metro Station / Arne Henriksen Arkitekter + MDH Arkitekter

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey

Luis Gordoa

Casa del Abuelo / Taller DIEZ 05

© Luis Gordoa © Luis Gordoa

Wooseop Hwang

Earth House / BCHO Architects

© Wooseop Hwang © Wooseop Hwang

Fernando Stankuns

Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, University of São Paulo (FAU-USP) / João Vilanova Artigas and Carlos Cascaldi

© Fernando Stankuns © Fernando Stankuns

Bruno Candiotto

Workshop House / PAX.ARQ

© Bruno Candiotto © Bruno Candiotto
Author: María Francisca González
Posted: August 20, 2017, 12:00 pm

If you ever have those moments where you take a step back from your life and feel like you’ve suddenly fallen into a scene from a movie, you may appreciate the subreddit /r/AccidentalWesAnderson. Director, producer, screenwriter, and actor Wes Anderson is well known for creating scenes in his films that blur the lines between the real and the unreal. His extreme symmetry and restricted color palettes can often give the impression of a surreal, self-contained world. The purpose of the Accidental Wes Anderson subreddit is for users to post photos of real-world architecture and scenes they’ve stumbled upon that look like they could be stills from one of Anderson’s movies, with Redditors finding Anderson-esque scenes around the globe in everything from bathrooms to staircases to city streets. Even a viewer unfamiliar with Anderson’s films can browse the collection of photos and easily understand his aesthetic. Below is just a small selection of some of the most evocative photos to be found on the subreddit.

Lighthouse in Húsavík, Iceland. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lg9c1/i_took_this_picture_of_a_lighthouse_in_h%C3%BAsav%C3%ADk/'>via Reddit user Milonade</a> Lighthouse in Húsavík, Iceland. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lg9c1/i_took_this_picture_of_a_lighthouse_in_h%C3%BAsav%C3%ADk/'>via Reddit user Milonade</a>

If you ever have those moments where you take a step back from your life and feel like you’ve suddenly fallen into a scene from a movie, you may appreciate the subreddit /r/AccidentalWesAnderson. Director, producer, screenwriter, and actor Wes Anderson is well known for creating scenes in his films that blur the lines between the real and the unreal. His extreme symmetry and restricted color palettes can often give the impression of a surreal, self-contained world. The purpose of the Accidental Wes Anderson subreddit is for users to post photos of real-world architecture and scenes they’ve stumbled upon that look like they could be stills from one of Anderson’s movies, with Redditors finding Anderson-esque scenes around the globe in everything from bathrooms to staircases to city streets. Even a viewer unfamiliar with Anderson’s films can browse the collection of photos and easily understand his aesthetic. Below is just a small selection of some of the most evocative photos to be found on the subreddit.

Choi Hung Estate in Hong Kong. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6s1glf/this_apartment_building/'>via Reddit user shaggysnorlax</a> Choi Hung Estate in Hong Kong. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6s1glf/this_apartment_building/'>via Reddit user shaggysnorlax</a>
Inside a tower in Pisa, Italy. Image <a href='http://i.imgur.com/m2b3P4d.jpg'>via Reddit user LaTalpa123</a> Inside a tower in Pisa, Italy. Image <a href='http://i.imgur.com/m2b3P4d.jpg'>via Reddit user LaTalpa123</a>
Sketch Restaurant, London. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6se4o1/sketch_restaurant_in_london/'>via Reddit user leprocto</a> Sketch Restaurant, London. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6se4o1/sketch_restaurant_in_london/'>via Reddit user leprocto</a>
Hotel Saratoga in Havana, Cuba. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6juk8c/hotel_saratoga_havana_cuba/'>via Reddit user saulbloodyenderby</a> Hotel Saratoga in Havana, Cuba. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6juk8c/hotel_saratoga_havana_cuba/'>via Reddit user saulbloodyenderby</a>
Reykjavík, Iceland. Image <a href='https://imgur.com/CbnCuWT'>via Reddit user ladydilara</a> Reykjavík, Iceland. Image <a href='https://imgur.com/CbnCuWT'>via Reddit user ladydilara</a>
Swimming Hall in Gotha, Germany. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6sswkz/swimminghall_in_gotha_germany/'>via Reddit user Teillu</a> Swimming Hall in Gotha, Germany. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6sswkz/swimminghall_in_gotha_germany/'>via Reddit user Teillu</a>
Hotel Belvédère near the Rhône Glacier, Switzerland. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6gg227/hotel_belv%C3%A9d%C3%A8re_near_the_rh%C3%B4ne_glacier_switzerland/'>via Reddit user pierreor</a> Hotel Belvédère near the Rhône Glacier, Switzerland. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6gg227/hotel_belv%C3%A9d%C3%A8re_near_the_rh%C3%B4ne_glacier_switzerland/'>via Reddit user pierreor</a>
Tin Mal Mosque, Morocco. Image <a href='https://i.imgur.com/BeNYBsu.jpg'>via Reddit user that-there</a> Tin Mal Mosque, Morocco. Image <a href='https://i.imgur.com/BeNYBsu.jpg'>via Reddit user that-there</a>
Men's room at The Fabulous Fox Theatre in St. Louis. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6m329p/mens_room_at_the_fabulous_fox_theatre_in_st_louis/'>via Reddit user heff66</a> Men's room at The Fabulous Fox Theatre in St. Louis. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6m329p/mens_room_at_the_fabulous_fox_theatre_in_st_louis/'>via Reddit user heff66</a>
Homes in Vietnam. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lqh6q/homes_in_vietnam/'>via Reddit user temporality</a> Homes in Vietnam. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lqh6q/homes_in_vietnam/'>via Reddit user temporality</a>
Author: Megan Fowler
Posted: August 20, 2017, 9:30 am

This is a room for a continuous video projection, for the documentation of a monumental but fragile installation made by Christian Boltanski in the Atacama Desert. With two concentric cylinders and two tunnel-like extensions, this sculptural piece is meant to erode its own figure in order to re-enact an inner landscape. It is a dimly lit, opaque and seamless chamber, rough enough so as to evoke the original distant place where the installation was recorded.

© Pezo von Ellrichshausen © Pezo von Ellrichshausen
  • Collaborators: Diego Perez, Teresa Freire, Shota Nemoto
  • Authors: Mauricio Pezo, Sofia von Ellrichshausen
  • Constructor: Jacky Cremona, So.Ré.Bat S.A.
  • Client: Christian Boltanski
  • Production: Solo Galerie, Christian Bourdais, Eva Albarran
© Pezo von Ellrichshausen © Pezo von Ellrichshausen

From the architect. This is a room for a continuous video projection, for the documentation of a monumental but fragile installation made by Christian Boltanski in the Atacama Desert. With two concentric cylinders and two tunnel-like extensions, this sculptural piece is meant to erode its own figure in order to re-enact an inner landscape. It is a dimly lit, opaque and seamless chamber, rough enough so as to evoke the original distant place where the installation was recorded.

Plan Plan
© Marc Domage © Marc Domage
Diagram Diagram

The radius of the smallest cylinder is, in fact, defined both by a fine-tuned equipment and by the precise distance of an observer immersed in the projected image. The other cylinder, as a consequence of the reversible path to go from outside to outside, might be read as a leftover of the inner corner in which the recorded landscape is projected. It is somehow difficult to understand how a small building can contain a massive landscape in its modest entrails. Here, what seems to be a defensive gesture towards the surrounding garden is no other than a haven for the devious and fleeting overlap between reality and fiction.

© Pezo von Ellrichshausen © Pezo von Ellrichshausen
Model Model
© Pezo von Ellrichshausen © Pezo von Ellrichshausen
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: August 20, 2017, 9:00 am

Though some may now know him only as the father of Eero SaarinenEliel Saarinen (August 20, 1873 – July 1, 1950) was an accomplished and style-defining architect in his own right. His pioneering form of stripped down, vernacular Art Nouveau coincided with stirring Finnish nationalism and a corresponding appetite for a romantic national style and consciousness; his Helsinki Central Station became part of the Finnish identity along with Finnish language theaters and literature. Later moving to America, his city planning and Art Deco designs resonated through western cities in the first half of the 20th century.

Helsinki Central Railway Station. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Railway_Station_20050604.jpg'>Wikimedia user Revontuli</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Helsinki Central Railway Station. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Railway_Station_20050604.jpg'>Wikimedia user Revontuli</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

Though some may now know him only as the father of Eero SaarinenEliel Saarinen (August 20, 1873 – July 1, 1950) was an accomplished and style-defining architect in his own right. His pioneering form of stripped down, vernacular Art Nouveau coincided with stirring Finnish nationalism and a corresponding appetite for a romantic national style and consciousness; his Helsinki Central Station became part of the Finnish identity along with Finnish language theaters and literature. Later moving to America, his city planning and Art Deco designs resonated through western cities in the first half of the 20th century.

Image <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eliel_Saarinen.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) Image <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eliel_Saarinen.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)

Graduating from the Helsinki University of Technology at the end of the 19th century, the 1900 World's Fair provided Saarinen with his first opportunity to draw attention. His Finnish Pavilion was an extraordinary mix of the many styles of the period, combining Art Nouveau with traditional Finnish wooden architecture and the Gothic Revival which had dominated much of Northern Europe for the previous 50 years. He continued working in this style, which would help found the National Romantic movement in Scandinavia. Building on the early commercialism of Art Nouveau, he even design a line of pottery for Arabia Pottery.

Finnish Pavillion at the 1900 World's Fair. Image via Wikimedia (public domain) Finnish Pavillion at the 1900 World's Fair. Image via Wikimedia (public domain)
National Museum of Finland. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Kansallismuseo_2006.jpg'>Wikimedia user Alessio Damato</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> National Museum of Finland. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Kansallismuseo_2006.jpg'>Wikimedia user Alessio Damato</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

A romantic imagining of a Finnish national past helped Saarinen's designs catch on, and he was soon designing National Museums, important railway stations and the other infrastructure typical to an ascendant national culture in the early twentieth century. His most important commission, Helsinki Central Railway Station, became known around the world as an example of Scandinavia's quiet, "rational" nationalism. His high profile helped him in breaking into city planning, working on plans for TallinnBudapest and Helsinki in the 1910s, and later influencing the design of Canberra.

Saarinen's unbuilt plan for the Haaga district of Helsinki. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Haga_vy.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) Saarinen's unbuilt plan for the Haaga district of Helsinki. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Haga_vy.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
The unbuilt plan for the Tribune Tower. Image via Wikimedia (public domain) The unbuilt plan for the Tribune Tower. Image via Wikimedia (public domain)

Interrupted by the First World War and changing tastes, Saarinen moved along with his then-13-year-old son Eero to the United States after his design for the Tribune Tower in Chicago was placed second in 1923. Although not built, his application of gothic verticality to a streamlined modern design won praise across the US and influenced many other architects in their designs for the early generation of skyscrapers; even Louis Sullivan, "father of skyscrapers", hailed his design as the future of the Chicago School. Working in the US through the 1940s, his style shaped and evolved Art Deco into the stripped back, West Coast style that would define mid-century Los Angeles.

Kleinhans Music Hall, Buffalo. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobistraveling/4029535536'>Flickr user bobistraveling</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Kleinhans Music Hall, Buffalo. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobistraveling/4029535536'>Flickr user bobistraveling</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

Like Father, Like Son: 4 Famous Architecture Dynasties

Author: Dario Goodwin
Posted: August 20, 2017, 8:00 am

Son of pioneering Finnish architect Eliel SaarinenEero Saarinen (August 20, 1910 – September 1, 1961) was not only born on the same day, but carried his father's later rational Art Deco into a neofuturist internationalism, regularly using sweeping curves and abundant glass. Saarinen's simple design motifs allowed him to be incredibly adaptable, turning his talent to furniture design with Charles Eames and producing radically different buildings for different clients. Despite his short career as a result of his young death, Saarinen gained incredible success and plaudits, winning some of the most sought-after commissions of the mid-twentieth century.

TWA Terminal. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/samsebeskazal/10283256224/'>Flickr user samsebeskazal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> TWA Terminal. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/samsebeskazal/10283256224/'>Flickr user samsebeskazal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

Son of pioneering Finnish architect Eliel SaarinenEero Saarinen (August 20, 1910 – September 1, 1961) was not only born on the same day, but carried his father's later rational Art Deco into a neofuturist internationalism, regularly using sweeping curves and abundant glass. Saarinen's simple design motifs allowed him to be incredibly adaptable, turning his talent to furniture design with Charles Eames and producing radically different buildings for different clients. Despite his short career as a result of his young death, Saarinen gained incredible success and plaudits, winning some of the most sought-after commissions of the mid-twentieth century.

Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eero-Saarinen.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Image by Balthazar Korab in public domain Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eero-Saarinen.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Image by Balthazar Korab in public domain

Saarinen was born in Finland and spent his childhood there before his father Eliel's architecture work took the family to the United States. Eero followed in the family tradition, studying design under his father at Cranbrook Academy of Art before moving to study in Paris at the end of the 1920s and then the Yale School of Architecture, from which he graduated in 1934. Eero first attracted attention while working with his father, particularly for his furniture design with Charles Eames, and he continued to produce influential furniture designs throughout his career; the Tulip Chair which he designed for Knoll, for example, has become known as a classic piece of design, as have many other of his pieces in the late 1940s and early 50s. Architecturally, however, Saarinen had been quietly building up a name for himself while working with his father's company, attracting international praise for Crow Island School (1940).

The Tulip Chair. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saarinen_Tulpanstolen.jpg'>Wikimedia user Holger.Ellgaard licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> The Tulip Chair. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saarinen_Tulpanstolen.jpg'>Wikimedia user Holger.Ellgaard licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

His first significant move out of his father's shadow came in 1947 when, still working at Eliel's practice, Eero entered his own design into the competition to design St Louis' Gateway Arch and ultimately won the commission. Supposedly, when the competition organizers were informing the second-round candidates of their success, they mistakenly addressed their telegram to Eliel Saarinen—it wasn't until three days later that they corrected their mistake, causing Eliel to graciously open another bottle of champagne to toast his son.

St Louis Gateway Arch. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffnps/5263761913'>Flickr user jeffnps</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> St Louis Gateway Arch. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffnps/5263761913'>Flickr user jeffnps</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

In 1950, working on the General Motors Technical Center with his father, Saarinen suddenly found himself sole architect after Eliel Saarinen's death. Creating a rational steel and glass design different from anything designed by Eliel Saarinen, Eero Saarinen rapidly found himself sought after by other major US corporations. Using this as a launching pad, Saarinen tirelessly fought for and won some of the 1950s' most prestigious commissions, including the TWA Terminal, Washington DC's Dulles International Airport, and the American Embassy in London.

Washington Dulles International Airport. Image © MWAA Washington Dulles International Airport. Image © MWAA

Even when he did not directly contribute to a design, Eero Saarinen would still have a dramatic effect on the path of architecture in the 1950s: famously, it was Saarinen who retrieved Jørn Utzon's Sydney Opera House design from the pile of rejected competition entries.

North Christian Church, Columbus. Image © Hassan Bagheri North Christian Church, Columbus. Image © Hassan Bagheri

Equally capable of creating a steel and glass cubist design as a sweeping futurist roof, Saarinen's incredible versatility combined with his near ubiquity in the mid-twentieth century led to widespread acclaim, with the AIA awarding him their Gold Medal in 1962, a year after his death. However, it also led to a fierce academic reaction to his work, notably from Yale professor Vincent Scully who criticized his apparent lack of a signature style.

MIT Chapel. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/janela_da_alma/222841971'>Flickr user janela_da_alma</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> MIT Chapel. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/janela_da_alma/222841971'>Flickr user janela_da_alma</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

Saarinen died in 1961, aged just 51, during an operation to remove a brain tumor, leaving his then-partners Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo to complete many of his important works (including the St Louis Arch), and to go on to have very successful careers of their own. Despite his astonishing success during a short career, Saarinen's influence was perhaps not fully recognized until recently, as the donation of Roche and Dinkeloo's Saarinen archives to Yale in 2005 helped lead to a surge of interest in his designs in the past decade.

View all of Eero Saarinen's work on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and more coverage below those:

Photographer Max Touhey Gives a Rare Glimpse Inside Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center

11 Projects Win Modernism in America Award

New Documentary to Dive into the Life and Works of Eero Saarinen

A Virtual Look Into Eames and Saarinen's Case Study House #9, The Entenza House

Photos of Eero Saarinen's Abandoned Bell Labs

André Balazs Tapped to Transform JFK's Historic TWA Terminal

Author: Dario Goodwin
Posted: August 20, 2017, 6:00 am

FLOW Hostel occupies the second floor of a more than hundred-year-old downtown historic building in Budapest. Our team was asked to turn the whole area into a hostel with 98 beds for young tourists traveling on a budget. In addition to rooms with capacities of four to eight people, a chain of communal areas was designed comprising of an entrance hall including the reception, a lounge, a canteen with self-service kitchen and a media area.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi
  • Architects: PRTZN Architecture
  • Location: Budapest, Gönczy Pál u., 1093 Hungary
  • Lead Architects: Gergely Hory, Zoltán Major, Péter Müllner
  • Area: 660.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Balázs Danyi
© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

From the architect. FLOW Hostel occupies the second floor of a more than hundred-year-old downtown historic building in Budapest. Our team was asked to turn the whole area into a hostel with 98 beds for young tourists traveling on a budget. In addition to rooms with capacities of four to eight people, a chain of communal areas was designed comprising of an entrance hall including the reception, a lounge, a canteen with self-service kitchen and a media area.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi
© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

Spatial Experience Instead of Dark Corridors and Preparation for the Unknown
During the XXth Century, the spatial arrangement and function of the real estate changed several times: It used to be an office, a student dormitory and in recent years it functioned as an alternative theatre. Our team was commissioned in 2015 to transform the place into a hostel.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

The building has a longitudinal layout with a load-bearing wall in the middle dividing the floor plan into two tracts, that are further divided by walls perpendicular to the facade. These walls had created a chain of interconnected generous spaces called emphilade.

Scheme Scheme
Floor Plan - After Floor Plan - After

As different types of uses occupied the building several corridors appeared that enabled rooms to operate independently, but at the same time, they became long, dark and narrow transit spaces.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

We did not only want to eliminate such areas during the design but wanted even to turn visitors’ daily movements inside the hostel an exciting spatial experience with bright and generous spaces.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

Learning from the past of the place we also wanted to prepare for possible future changes by finding out architectural means that enable functional modifications to the possibly highest extent on the lowest possible cost of time and infrastructure.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

Chain of Public Activity Spaces: Versatile Structures, Neutral Infrastructure
We had the idea to use the community functions to avoid spatial monotonicity: instead of separate rooms, we designated these functions as a chain of spaces bonding the whole floor together as a paraphrase to the emphilade.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

With the homogeneous linoleum flooring, the uniformly white walls and the arrangement of cable trays below the ceiling for the various mechanic systems and other permanent elements we made a neutral ’infrastructure’ that can be easily adapted to unknown future changes in use.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

Onto this neutral base, each public area was given a unique character through the design of furniture and other easily changeable elements of the interior custom designed by us. We designed modular, lightweight and easily demountable interior elements since this is the layer that is to change in the shortest period of time.

© Balázs Danyi © Balázs Danyi

When visitors want to reach their room they walk through this mixture of spaces with heterogeneous physical characters that provide versatile activities instead of dark and monotone corridors.

Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: August 20, 2017, 5:00 am

The project takes place within a large parcel in Fiesso d’Artico, a little village along the bankside area of the Brenta River, also called ‘Riviera del Brenta’, in the mainland territory of the province of Venice.

© Alessanda Bello © Alessanda Bello
  • Architects: MIDE architetti
  • Location: Fiesso d'Artico, Italy
  • Architects In Charge: Fabrizio Michielon, Sergio de Gioia
  • Area: 950.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Alessanda Bello
  • Collaborators : Raffaele Camputaro, Ingrid Cagol
  • Consultants : Daniele Nesti, Francesco Terrin
© Alessanda Bello © Alessanda Bello

From the architect. The project takes place within a large parcel in Fiesso d’Artico, a little village along the bankside area of the Brenta River, also called ‘Riviera del Brenta’, in the mainland territory of the province of Venice.

© Alessanda Bello © Alessanda Bello

The essential outline and the pure profiles of the architectural volume were obtained by intentionally conceal gutters and drainpipes within the roof stratigraphy.

Section Section

The designed building hosts a single-family residence distributed onto two levels: one for the day, the other for the night usage.

© Alessanda Bello © Alessanda Bello

At the ground floor the space is articulated through the kitchen area, living room equipment and technical rooms. The entire space is featured by a large glazed wall that leads to the compressed space of the exterior portico, consists of a real geometric procedure of subtraction from the stereometric mass of the building. This operation favours an ideal and functional connection between interior and exterior, allowing light to diffuse uniformly throughout the ground floor and, at the same time, filtering straight sunlight hitting.

Floor Plan Floor Plan

At the first floor have been placed bedrooms and a bathroom. Here, the contrast with permeability of the ground level is declared. The space is more intimate and enclosed although, by facing the large double height space of the living room, the corridor and the staircase transmit natural light coming from the large glass wall and become physical element of connection with the outside.

© Alessanda Bello © Alessanda Bello
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: August 20, 2017, 2:00 am

Ideas of culture and connectivity underpinned our design for the Gwynne Street Studio, a dynamic warehouse conversion in Cremorne, an inner-city suburb of Melbourne. The brief called for two new tenancies within a warehouse shell – a new office for Create Company and a new studio for our own practice, with a shared boardroom and breakout space. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis
  • Architects: Biasol
  • Location: 10/12 Gwynne St, Cremorne VIC 3121, Australia
  • Area: 480.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Ari Hatzis
© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

From the architect. Ideas of culture and connectivity underpinned our design for the Gwynne Street Studio, a dynamic warehouse conversion in Cremorne, an inner-city suburb of Melbourne. The brief called for two new tenancies within a warehouse shell – a new office for Create Company and a new studio for our own practice, with a shared boardroom and breakout space. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

The warehouse’s art deco exterior and the neighbourhood’s creative/industrial past provided rich inspiration for our design. Once a hub for manufacturing, Cremorne has seen an influx of young professionals, start-ups and creative industries in recent years, breathing new life into its mix of warehouses, factory shells and Victorian cottages. 

Plan Plan

We retained the warehouse’s brick bounding walls and the steel trusses that supported the roof. The exterior was refreshed with a vibrant pink and grey palette, which continues inside as a subtle highlight. New steel signage picks up on the building’s heritage, while a driveway entry ramp recalls its previous life as an offset printer.  

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

Within, we imagined the interiors as a contemporary, unpretentious space with a modern industrial aesthetic. We installed a new transparent roof that floods the interior with natural light. Instead of solid walls, glazed floor-to-ceiling partitioning with black framework connects the interior spaces, creating an openness that reflects our way of working. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

Where more privacy was required, panels of reeded glass provide a degree of separation. 

The design responds to the individual character of the two tenants. For Biasol, we designed an open-plan studio space that encourages creativity, collaboration and the sharing of ideas. A subtle colour palette acts a backdrop to our creative output. For Create Company, we developed a modern and professional space accented with a rich teal colour. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

The spatial configuration in both offices fosters interaction and collaboration, while 

providing enough flexibility to accommodate future growth. The kitchen acts as creative hub for both of the tenancies – filled with a curated collection of art, it is an inviting, almost home-like space. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis

The pared-back materials palette incorporates polished concrete floors, lime-washed ply, White Fantasy marble, and greenery from Glasshaus. Bespoke furniture – including custom work stations – defines each zone. While the project offers a respectful nod to the building’s heritage, it also incorporates twenty-first-century technology, with a Sonos sound system, underfloor heating and air-conditioning built in. 

The result is a layered and highly functional interior characterised by detail, materiality and quality finishes. 

© Ari Hatzis © Ari Hatzis
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: August 19, 2017, 8:00 pm

A team led by Alberto Moletto, Cristóbal Tirado, Sebastián Hernández and Danilo Lagos has been selected as the winners of the Punta Arenas International Antarctic Center (CAI) design competition. 

Cortesía de Equipo Primer Lugar Cortesía de Equipo Primer Lugar

A team led by Alberto Moletto, Cristóbal Tirado, Sebastián Hernández and Danilo Lagos has been selected as the winners of the Punta Arenas International Antarctic Center (CAI) design competition. 

The ambitious state-owned project sought to create a "distinctive and iconic infrastructure that is necessary to consolidate the position of Chile as an Antarctic country and Punta Arenas as the main gateway city to West Antarctica."

Take an in-depth look at the winning proposal, described by its authors as a hybrid building, organized "formally and programmatically from strata or superimposed layers, materially varied to host diverse program elements, each with its own character." Here, the architects tell their story.

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Project Description

Men Wanted: For hazardous journey, small wages, bitter cold, long month of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful, honour and recognition in case of success.

My first trip to Punta Arenas was by boat. From the Strait of Magellan, I could see a distant volume, light and ethereal, floating over the city’s edge. The sinuous edges of the volume made it difficult to understand its geometry from a distance, revealing a body pierced by the passage of time. Quickly coming to mind was the image of a drifting iceberg and the first sailors to navigate the Magellan straight catching sight of the far-off lights of the native inhabitants. With this last image in mind, I could see the starting point of the city.

Axonometry Axonometry

Once in Punta Arena, I went to visit the International Antarctica Center and realized it was the building I had seen from afar, organized in strata. The first layer was a dark, stony base containing the programmatic elements for the traffic of goods and vehicles. In turn, this dense volume sustained a lighter, translucent volume for the inhabitable programs used by scientists and visitors.

The main floor, three stories above the ground and linearly organized, had a large void that opened up to an image of the city from afar by means of a linear, perimeter path that also became a balcony to contemplate the Magellan Strait. This perimeter space was dominated by a calm, homogenous light that contrasted the unstable climate of the exterior to construct a more abstract space, allowing for a more intimate connection with the activities taking place on this level. The main access to the public exhibition hall was located in the center of the plan and following this perimeter space, finished with an auditorium featuring views of the landscape that dominates Punta Arenosa. The programming located at the building’s center varied in height depending on the volume of air needed by each. On the exterior, on this same level, there was a platform like a dock where one could have a more direct contact with the Magellan Strait and the views to the city as well as a establish a direct relationship with the power of the Patagonian Climate.

Cortesía de Equipo Primer Lugar Cortesía de Equipo Primer Lugar

In the upper part of the building, parallel to the main floor and floating over the double-height volumes generated by the public spaces, the laboratories dominate the totality of the space. From above, I could see how this program had independent entrances that connected to the vaulted floor level and the nearby urban surroundings designated for the scientists’ activities without interfering with those of us visiting but which at the same time allowed for a spatial interaction between the different users and activities in the International Antarctic Center.

Upon finishing my visit, I understood that the IAC was conceived not only as building independent of the city but that part of its program related directly with Punta Arenas and thus formed a building of an urban character situated in and out of the landscape.

Building Description

Main Floor Main Floor

The International Antarctic Center Project is a particular example of a hybrid building where the intersection of elements of very different natures are joined to create a single enclave that gives a new particular sense to the place where it is found: Punta Arenas.

The projects are formally and programmatically organized by superimposed strata or layers, materially varied to host diverse program elements, each with its own character.

Urban Proposal

Urban Context Urban Context

The project appropriates all the threads that make up the fabric of Punta Arenosa, building an antechamber to the CAI. In this way and despite the fact that the building is located on an urban plot, a project is built in the landscape, both from its location and its relationship to the Strait of Magellan.

The CAI completes the coastal edge of Punta Arenas from the construction of a lighthouse building,  backlit that assumes its edge condition to be seen, operate as a guide and at the same time be an observation platform.

Programmatic Proposal

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To avoid excavating on sandy terrain, the project is elevated to leave the ground floor for vehicular and pedestrian access and to transport the different users, samples, and goods.

Parking, mechanical spaces, and part of the auditorium are located on the second level, crossed by the entrances and the Millenial Forest to connect to the rest of the building.

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The public program is located on the main floor. This third level has the auditorium on one end that looks out over the landscape. Its strategic location allows for the auditorium to have an independent entrance so that it can act as an autonomous space independent from the rest of the building.

The smaller exhibition rooms, the upper galleries of the auditorium and the upper volumes of the main halls are located on the fourth floor.

The laboratories on the fifth floor finish the building and are laid out along the whole length of the plan, giving the scientists total control of the inhabitable space and entrances separate from visitors. 

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Climatic Proposal

The main strategy of the building is to create a large transitional space from which all the required program elements will be generated. The envelope is created through the use of low-emission, translucent panels which help to control the loss of heat and the overall environment of the building.

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Author: Nicolás Valencia
Posted: August 19, 2017, 4:00 pm

NEON is a nonprofit organization that works to bring contemporary culture closer to everyone. 

NEON is a nonprofit organization that works to bring contemporary culture closer to everyone. 

The Theater of Disappearance is a site specific, outdoor and indoor installation by Argentinian artist Adrian Villar Rojas in Greece, at the National Observatory of Athens (NOA), located on the archaeological site of the Hill of the Nymphs. Built in 1846, the National Observatory is the first scientific research institution in Greece and consolidates nearly two centuries of astronomy since Greek independence in 1832. This is a project curated by Elina Kountouri, that forms part of NEON’s work to establish a link between contemporary culture and the historical and archaeological heritage of Athens.

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON

Today, almost 170 years later, this commission sees Villar Rojas negotiating with an archaeological site for the first time as he radically alters both the indoor and outdoor space of the National Observatory, occupying an area of 4,500 square meters. The whole site undergoes a complete transformation – architectural, horticultural and emotional.

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON
© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON

Through this site-specific intervention in Athens Villar Rojas asks, ‘what does it mean to have the soil beneath our feet?’ Villar Rojas says: “I come from Argentina, where essentially soil is a means of production. That which is beneath our feet does not represent us in the same way that it represents people in Greece, nor people in Turkey. I think we Argentinians equate soil with fertility and this, of course, is a geopolitical construct made by Europe, the Western world and the global economic powers in general. No doubt the strongest features of our national identity are our crops and cattle, endlessly provided by a ‘God–blessed’ soil upon flat grasslands whose only limit is the sky. It seems a bit of an exaggeration, but just drive from Buenos Aires to Rosario crossing the countryside in the center of the ‘Humid Pampas’ and you will quickly understand why Argentinians are so proud of their land. So, when I arrived in Greece, I immediately understood that for Greeks what is below their feet was as constitutive of their national identity as it is for Argentinians, but in a completely different way. What was beneath their feet was culture: thousands of years of human civilizations.” 

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON
© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON
© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON

The artist has selected 46,000 different plants from 26 different species: a mix of graminaceous plants including bamboo, seeds and grains, and fruits and vegetables such as artichokes, watermelons, asparagus, and pumpkins. Re-planted from nurseries side by side in this unorthodox way, all the plants must survive and co-exist for four months. The act of planting serves as a symbol of liberation, co-existence, struggle, and reparation. Villar Rojas disorientates the internal geography of the National Observatory. The viewer walks through narrow pathways leading through the areas of fertile soil but the physical borders of the area are not clearly defined allowing visitors to wander and lose their way. Outside the National Observatory, the landscape undergoes a similar metamorphosis. Instead of digging down into the ground, Villar Rojas plants densely on top of it, in a constructed, artificial second level of soil.

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON
© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON

The intensely fertile area gives way dramatically to a barren, polemical zone. Villar Rojas disrupts the usual dynamics of the National Observatory by utilizing a neglected space. Sculptural installations inside eleven variously sized vitrines expose the brutality of years of conquest and expansion and our quest for colonizing new territory on earth and beyond.

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON

The Theater of Disappearance in Athens becomes an open-ended investigation of cultural traditions, national norms and stereotypes, learned preconceptions and received histories of conquest and exploration.

© Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON © Panos Kokkinias, Courtesy NEON
Author: Danae Santibañez
Posted: August 19, 2017, 2:00 pm

The Modern Art Museum of Medellin (MAMM) after 6 years of gestation has just opened to the public a major extension, more than doubling its size, by adding 7000 sq. meters to the existing 3000sq. it had in a refurbished steel factory.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli
  • Architects: Ctrl G, 51-1 arquitectos
  • Location: Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Architects Ctrl G: Catalina Patiño, Viviana Peña
  • Architects 51 1: César Becerra, Manuel de Rivero, Fernando Puente Arnao
  • Design Team: Sebastián Monsalve, Jorge Gómez, Eduardo Peláez
  • Area: 7500.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Federico Cairoli
  • General Coordinator: Isabel Dapena
  • Collaborators: Luisa Amaya, Oscar Cano, Lucia Largo, María Camila Giraldo, Juan Camilo Arboleda, Nicolás Martínez, Favio Chumpitaz, Bruce Wong, Felipe Vanegas, Carolina Vélez, Luisa Echeverry, Juliana Vélez, Felipe Walter, Mónica Suarez, Sebastián Mejía, Camilo Martínez, Paula Mesa, Juan David Vargas, Luisa Lara, Juan José Riva, Juan Pablo Giraldo
  • Construction Collaborators: Lina Durango, Laura Burgos
  • Structural Engineering: CNI Ingenieros Consultores - Nicolas Parra G.
  • Engineering Collaborators: Ivan Dario Acevedo, Lorena Cañon, Carol Pavon, Santiago Parra
  • Builder: Conconcreto
  • Interventory: Luis Guillermo Restrepo y Cia S.A.S.
  • Client: Museo de Arte Moderno de Medellín y Alcaldía de Medellín
  • Ctrl G: Colombia
  • 51 1: Peru
© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

From the architect. The Modern Art Museum of Medellin (MAMM) after 6 years of gestation has just opened to the public a major extension, more than doubling its size, by adding 7000 sq. meters to the existing 3000sq. it had in a refurbished steel factory.

Volume Scheme Volume Scheme

MAMM
The Modern Art Museum of Medellin (MAMM) was founded in 1978 by a group of artists with the aim to arouse public interest in modern and contemporary art.

It was housed in the communal space (originally intended for a church) from the Carlos E. Restrepo social housing estate, and since its beginnings got regional relevance by events as the 1st Latin-American Congress of Non-objectional Art and Urban Art in 1981 or the Rabinovich Art Salon, the big promoter of young Colombian artists.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

CIUDAD DEL RIO
In 2006, under mayor Sergio Fajardo’s administration, Medellin established the reconversion of –strategic- industrial land from SIMESA steel plant into a mixed used neighborhood called ‘Ciudad del Rio’ (River City).

The urban plan considered the dismantling of all factories to allow for generic high-rise blocks in a rigid scheme, leaving only the oldest nave -‘Talleres de Robledo’- as the sole testimony of the industrial past. It was then successfully refurbished by the mythical Grupo Utopia as the new venue of the Modern Art Museum on the 30th anniversary of its founding.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION
In 2009, with the opening of its new home, MAMM organized an international design competition for its major expansion to house the requirements for achieving a world class museum infrastructure.

Fifteen prestigious international architectural studios were invited to team up with local Colombian colleagues for submitting their entries. In December 2009, the jury chaired by Spanish architect Federico Soriano and the public’s vote of those who visited the exhibited proposals awarded the first prize to the team of 51-1 from Peru and Ctrl G from Colombia.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

LEARNING FROM LOS BARRIOS
51-1 + Ctrl G proposal, initiated from the application of Medellin’s own informal settlement patterns of progressive growth at its hillsides. Piled on top of each other, construction in the barrios steps up creating thousands of public interstices, where people exercise their urbanity in the most ingenious ways.

An open system connected by stairs. A neighborhood life made out of terraces, front yards, and stairways. The apparent informality on the play of volumes is inseminated with flexibility, common sense, and care, values so necessary for a public building.

Squares Diagram Squares Diagram

YIN YANG
If with the celebrated urban renovation process of the hillsides of Medellin, the city ‘exported’ structure and equipment (metro cable, stairs, parks, libraries) then it is time for the vitality and flexibility of those barrios to be ‘imported’ to the rigidity of the nascent Ciudad del Rio.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

If neighborhoods had a soul and were given a structure, new Ciudad del Rio has a structure but still lacked soul. That is the task of MAMM, as responsible of cultural and artistic strengthening of the new environment.

Neighborhood-City Scheme Neighborhood-City Scheme

A VILLAGE, NOT A BUILDING
Instead of a building, a vertical village. This way, as in the informal barrios of stacked houses in the hillsides, where one’s roof is upstairs neighbor’s terrace, in the MAMM Expansion, the required programs are piled up making a cascade of public terraces connected by stairs.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

A Colombian Piranesi. Inside, a promenade of art spaces. Outside, a vertical extension of the linear park of Ciudad del Rio up to the fifth floor: each one of these terraces can be seen as spatial reserves for the future growth of museum spaces. The incomplete museum that can extend either in an ephemeral or a definite way, according to its available resources.

Section B Section B

This concept, based on a flexible model and not in a given shape proved very consistent when -after the competition was awarded- MAMM heavily amended its program based on budget, materiality (from brick to concrete) and requirement adjustments (as usually happens in the actual neighborhoods) so new demands were rearranged where it was most convenient, and the essence of the project remained unaltered.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

ELEVEN BOXES AND A VOID
The museum is built in 5 levels. Besides new art galleries, it hosts laboratories, storage, offices, shops, cafés and a theatre. These areas need to be closed, hermetic and with special light and geometric conditions. They are like boxes.

Each one closed by prefabricated concrete panels which are pierced, cut, and carved to reveal different color, light, and textures. Eleven boxes -of different sizes and heights- rotate and pile on top of each other, in a careful and strategic placement. This in-between empty space, it’s the place where programs are mixed, relations multiplied between people and dialogues allowed with the landscape.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

DOUBLE CIRCULATION
From the museography point of view, this organization allows for traditional, regular and closed exhibition spaces, as well as open and more flexible new ways for art display, and –most importantly- the simultaneous use of an internal museum circulation (ticket paid) integrating the box office with temporary galleries in Talleres de Robledo wing with new permanent galleries on the fourth level; and an external free and public route that elevates from the plaza into the theater and the laboratories of the third level up to the restaurant in level five, showing new vantage points for viewing the city and enjoying its pleasant year long spring weather in plentiful activity.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

INTEGRATION
The expansion project is not conceived as an isolated building from the preexistent venue. The extension of the central nave into the center and inside the 51-1 + Ctrl G addition configures the new main entrance of the museum: a great void that connects old and new.

It is intended an emphatic aperture and integration towards surrounding public space, which is made clear in the continuity of the pavement, the allocation of great programmatic activity towards the exterior (shops, cafés, public toilets) and the absence of barriers. This is not only to extend the city’s public life inside the building but to –inversely- make possible that art and culture propagate to the exterior making them more public and accessible.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

2X1
Each closed program from the museum complements with an open space, being a balcony, a plaza or a terrace. These spaces, beyond configuring as public spaces or open-air extensions of exhibitions, allow for users to pause and gaze the city.

Double use has also been considered for the theater since by investing in equipping only one stage, it can be arranged as a conventional (closed) theater or -by opening its eastern façade- to face the linear park attending a more massive audience. Many possibilities are enabled with this: a lecture inside the theater, the projection of an open-air movie or the staging of a concert having the plaza as a stage and the audience along the theater tribune.

2x1 Theater Diagram 2x1 Theater Diagram

Project Description
LEVEL 1
In the first level there are 3 boxes:
First is a box forming the entrances: towards the street and towards the plaza. It contains the underground parking access, the museum shop, public toilets, and the dressing room and podium for the theater.

Another box -aligned with the border- contains the art storage and the small café serving the plaza.
The third is a glazed box containing the box office and the access to Talleres de Robledo temporary galleries and the permanent galleries in the fourth level through the elevators.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

LEVEL 2
There are 2 boxes in the second level. Both correspond to the museum offices which are covered by prefabricated concrete fret works that allow ‘seeing without been seen’. This is the only level in the project that doesn’t have a direct access from public stairways since it for the museum only private use.

Section C Section C

LEVEL 3
On the third level there are 3 boxes:
A box contains the Sound Experiment Laboratory and 2 more laboratories for class and workshops given at the museum.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

Another box -at the corner- hosts toilets and vertical circulation (2 public elevators, a service lift, and emergency stairs).
The third box is the Theater seating 256 people. It can also be configured as an open theater with the city as a stage by opening its east façade, or even using the same stage but facing contiguous plaza for massive events as concerts.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

LEVEL 4
In fourth level there are 2 boxes:
Both contain the 3 exhibition galleries for the museum permanent collection, each one complemented by an open space allowing exterior exhibitions or simply pauses in the trajectory to gaze the city.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli

LEVEL 5
In fifth level there is just one box, which is defined by metallic fretworks containing the space for the restaurant and events of the museum, profiting from the two large adjacent terraces.

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: August 19, 2017, 1:00 pm

Stairs do more than take you up a floor; they represent a journey the architect wants you to travel. The act of ascending and descending extends beyond planning. Projects like Herzog and De Meuron’s expressive staircases in VitraHaus, Sou Fujimoto’s inhabited stairs in Musashino’s Library and even MVRDV’s giant urban staircase allowed individuals to achieve entirely new perspectives of their surroundings or even city. Staircases hold their own as elements of architectural expression. Some blend in; others puncture a space with their unique shape and materials. 

Stairs do more than take you up a floor; they represent a journey the architect wants you to travel. The act of ascending and descending extends beyond planning. Projects like Herzog and De Meuron’s expressive staircases in VitraHaus, Sou Fujimoto’s inhabited stairs in Musashino’s Library and even MVRDV’s giant urban staircase allowed individuals to achieve entirely new perspectives of their surroundings or even city. Staircases hold their own as elements of architectural expression. Some blend in; others puncture a space with their unique shape and materials. 

"Among all the architectural elements, with no doubt, the stair is for the building the same as the arteries and veins to the human body. As these carry blood to all organs, those with a similar branch, are essential for communication. In a figurative sense, the stair would be like the heart of a building, which fills it with life. The stair also has a temporal dimension: climbing up a stair means a lapse of time. The stairs and their steps have a rhythm. Its repercussion becomes evident when the steps are counted when going up or down. Above all else, the stair is a three-dimensional element. Its orientation is the gradient slope and its optical effect is the continuous change of perspective as it passes through it. This feeling reinforces the verticality as a movement line, both up and down." (Vicenio Samozzi, Italian Architect, in 1615).

From textural timber to curving concrete, here are 10 examples from our archives to check out:  

SDM Apartment / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop

Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop

Olivo Gomes Residence / Rino Levi

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon

Antinori Winery / Archea Associati

© Pietro Savorelli © Pietro Savorelli

House of Cubes / Embaixada Arquitectura

Courtesy of Embaixada arquitectura Courtesy of Embaixada arquitectura

C-51 House / Ábaton Arquitectura

© Cortesia da Ábaton Arquitectura © Cortesia da Ábaton Arquitectura

CASA REX / FGMF Arquitetos

© Rafaela Netto © Rafaela Netto

Bic Banco Headquarters / Kiko Salomão

© Fran Parente © Fran Parente

House in Tamatsu / Ido, Kenji Architectural Studio

© Yohei Sasakura © Yohei Sasakura

Casa Del Grande Staircase / Rafael Iglesia

© Gustavo Frittegotto © Gustavo Frittegotto

Weekend House in Downtown São Paulo / SPBR

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon
Author: Victor Delaqua
Posted: August 19, 2017, 12:00 pm

Currently, virtual reality and 360-degree video are somewhat niche tools, but they are rapidly gaining in popularity. These immersive technologies give architects a means to better decipher a client’s expectations—everything from a building’s natural lighting to the choice of tile backsplash can be actively assessed at any point in the design and construction process. This transformative technology has already been fully incorporated into some practices. ArchDaily interviewed Henning Larsen’s Chief Engineer of Sustainability Jakob Strømann-Andersen to better understand the current and future applications of virtual immersion in architecture.

Currently, virtual reality and 360-degree video are somewhat niche tools, but they are rapidly gaining in popularity. These immersive technologies give architects a means to better decipher a client’s expectations—everything from a building’s natural lighting to the choice of tile backsplash can be actively assessed at any point in the design and construction process. This transformative technology has already been fully incorporated into some practices. ArchDaily interviewed Henning Larsen’s Chief Engineer of Sustainability Jakob Strømann-Andersen to better understand the current and future applications of virtual immersion in architecture.

Screenshot from a VR mockup of a Henning Larsen project. Image Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects Screenshot from a VR mockup of a Henning Larsen project. Image Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Thomas Musca: The disappointing response from consumers to the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive have led some to conclude that virtual reality may have little current use outside of gaming or demonstrative gimmicks. This has led to a mix of opinions towards the future role of immersive technology architecture. Why have you elected to develop spaces in virtual reality? How can 360-degree video enhance the design process?

Jakob Strømann-Andersen: This technology has the potential to rise way beyond a gimmick if we develop the space you immerse yourself into. The whole point for us is to build the experience; we want to improve the virtual space by providing much more than just a great architectural visual. We strive to create a more interactive experience by integrating real-time lights and auditory stimulation to make the experience even more authentic. This means that, in the earliest stages, the end-user of the future building can already get not only a visual impression of the building but also use their other senses for an accurate preview of the space. Architects can then make adjustments accordingly based on the user’s evaluation of the room. We can alter acoustic settings, light settings and so on, so the indoor climate of the space will fit the end-user. We can ask people how they perceive the space way before we hit the site, or even glimpse the rendering. It can qualify the decisions we make as designers in regards to important human aspects like acoustics.

At the University of Cincinnati, Lindner College of Business, we had users walk through three different classrooms in a virtual space, each with a different acoustic setting and different sound absorbents (carpet flooring, wall absorbents and sound-proof ceilings) to decide which they preferred. For each room, we recorded an acoustic simulation that they listened to when they moved through the rooms. For us, this idea has a tremendous potential. If we use the tools scientifically, and if we use them to actively make better decisions that are anchored in user experience, then it won’t just be a gimmick. Imagine the next level to be actually feeling the surface, smelling the landscape. The visual aspect is just one part.

TM: Most architectural renders are intentionally fantastical mockups designed to capture the imagination of clients. Does the shift towards realism provided by 360-degree videos force designers to present a more truthful narrative of a project?

JSA: It is important to note that realism won’t enter until the building is finished. Until then, the craft, details, and the meeting of materials are difficult to accurately represent. The 360-degree space immersion is still a mockup and should be presented as such. However, what the technology enables us to do is to make better decisions for the people eventually moving into the space than a traditional rendering would allow. Because of this, it is our responsibility to be accurate and transparent in how we present it. A lot of decisions will change during the design process, and immersive tech enables a new level of testing and altering.

TM: Both 360-degree videos and virtual reality allow viewers to self-curate their own experience in a space. Given that people will experience this technology through mediocre computer speakers, sub-par displays, confused camera panning, and so on are you cautious that the experience could be corrupted by variables outside of the designer’s control?

JSA: We’re not too concerned about a discrepancy in the quality of the technology. We do not consider these tools as a "test-at-home" facility, but as a service architects can provide in a controlled setting. It is up to us as designers to be able to manage the data we collect from the "self-curating" end-user. As with all other scientific data collection, we must calibrate our data, eliminate sources of errors, and validate input. It is on the architect to determine how the 360-degree experience is different from reality. Like other qualitative research, it is important that we contextualize. "Perception of space" is something we continuously research, as it is an important parameter in human-centered design. The use of immersion to qualify design decisions is a discipline anchored very much in qualitative research.

TM: Do you see 360-degree videos and virtual reality as a limited technology that can only be used to develop only certain types of architecture?

JSA: This technology can be rewarding for all end-users. It is suited to creating a better experience of the space, comfort, indoor climate. It is for people that can’t articulate their feelings and desires. They need to experience it first—and now they can. The difference is that immersion allows architects to actually do something about their remarks.

TM: Do you have any reservations about using this technology?

JSA: Some of our concerns are that it can be something of a solo experience. While one’s tethered to VR goggles, it can be hard to share with others. That said, we’re very optimistic about the potential of the technology. In the near future, we’ll be able to immerse ourselves into a shared virtual space right in our office and take part of the same experience with only a push of a button. We have always been very concerned with user evaluation and end user involvement, but this technology provides a whole new layer of information. We are now able to collect immediate responses on an array of parameters: acoustics, lighting, materials, and reactions. That is a gift! Not only for us as designers, but for the future of architecture.

Author: Thomas Musca
Posted: August 19, 2017, 9:30 am

This apartment, built in the 80s, has problems that are typical of the architectural debilities of most of the portuguese housing buildings of the second half of the XX century: low ceilings throughout the house, subdivided spaces, long narrow kitchens, winding corridors and numerous protrusions of pillars and beams that reveal an unresolved conflict between structure and architecture.

Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino
  • Architects: Miguel Marcelino
  • Location: Lisbon, Portugal
  • Area: 115.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Collaborator: Débora Martins
  • General Contractor: Vassalo & Sousa
Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino

From the architect. This apartment, built in the 80s, has problems that are typical of the architectural debilities of most of the portuguese housing buildings of the second half of the XX century: low ceilings throughout the house, subdivided spaces, long narrow kitchens, winding corridors and numerous protrusions of pillars and beams that reveal an unresolved conflict between structure and architecture.

Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino
Before / After Before / After
Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino

The intervention seeks to reduce the usual sectioning between kitchen, hall, corridors and living room, creating a fluid space with large visual fields and richer possibilities of appropriation. The bedrooms maintain a private character and the toilets are redrawn so as to break the feeling of claustrophobia. Protruding structural elements of beams and pillars will have its concrete re-exposed, without shame, and together with the new wooden elements, will contribute to the new atmosphere of the apartment, reigniting the qualities and pleasure of living in an apartment, in a city.

Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino Courtesy of Miguel Marcelino
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: August 19, 2017, 9:00 am

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

01. Hiroyuki Oki

Binh House / VTN Architects 

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

02. Edith Verhoeven

Modern Countryside Villa / Maas architecten 

© Edith Verhoeven © Edith Verhoeven

03. Krzysztof Strażyński

Apartment For A Guy And Even Two Of Them / Metaforma 

© Krzysztof Strażyński © Krzysztof Strażyński

04. Agnese Sanvito

Gallery House / Neil Dusheiko Architects 

© Agnese Sanvito © Agnese Sanvito

05. Parham Taghioff

Pars Hospital / New Wave Architecture

© Parham Taghioff © Parham Taghioff

06. Gwendolyn Huisman and Marijn Boterman

skinnySCAR / Gwendolyn Huisman and Marijn Boterman 

Courtesy of Gwendolyn Huisman and Marijn Boterman Courtesy of Gwendolyn Huisman and Marijn Boterman

07. Martin Gardner

The Quest / Strom Architects

© Martin Gardner © Martin Gardner

08. Iwan Baan

Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects 

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan

09. Shinkenchiku Sha

Nest We Grow / College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley + Kengo Kuma & Associates 

© Shinkenchiku-sha © Shinkenchiku-sha

10. Edward Hendricks

House 24 / Park + Associates

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks

11. Kyungsub Shin

The Layers / OBBA 

© Kyungsub Shin © Kyungsub Shin

12. ArchSD

Kai Tak Primary School / ArchSD 

Courtesy of ArchSD Courtesy of ArchSD

13. Jack Thompsen

Concrete Box House / Robertson Design 

© Jack Thompsen © Jack Thompsen

14. Rafael Gamo

Next Hydroponic Plant / CC Arquitectos 

© Rafael Gamo                          © Rafael Gamo

15. Anand Jaju

Brick House / Architecture Paradigm 

© Anand Jaju © Anand Jaju

16. Hufton+Crow

Harbin Opera House / MAD Architects 

© Hufton+Crow © Hufton+Crow

17. Fernando Gomulya

Splow House / Delution Architect 

© Fernando Gomulya © Fernando Gomulya

18. Tom Blachford

Courtyard House / FIGR Architecture & Design 

© Tom Blachford © Tom Blachford

19. Kevin Scott

Cabin at Longbranch / Olson Kundig 

© Kevin Scott © Kevin Scott

20. Paolo Rosselli

Bosco Verticale / Boeri Studio

Courtesy of Paolo Rosselli Courtesy of Paolo Rosselli

21. Shannon McGrath

Armadale House / Robson Rak Architects + Made By Cohen 

© Shannon McGrath © Shannon McGrath

22. Brad Feinknopf

TinkerBox / Studio MM Architect 

© Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf

23. Ilya Kruchinin

Landform House / A61architects + YYdesign 

© Ilya Kruchinin © Ilya Kruchinin

24. Ivan Avdeenko

Arthouse / Pominchuk Architects 

© Ivan Avdeenko © Ivan Avdeenko

25. Terrence Zhang

Parc Central / Benoy 

© Terrence Zhang © Terrence Zhang

26. Rafael Gamo

Portales Dwelling / Fernanda Canales 

© Rafael Gamo                          © Rafael Gamo

27. Åke E-son Lindman

Kalmar Museum of Art / Tham & Videgård Arkitekter 

© Åke E- son Lindman © Åke E- son Lindman

28. Nic Lehoux

The Bear Stand / Bohlin Grauman Miller & Bohlin Cywinski Jackson 

© Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux

29. Sophie Mayer

Rural House / RCR Arquitectes 

© Sophie Mayer © Sophie Mayer

30. Chibi Moku

Swiss Simplicity / Wohlgemuth & Pafumi Architekten 

© Chibi Moku © Chibi Moku

31. Andrés Lejona

One on One / Moreno Architecture 

© Andrés Lejona © Andrés Lejona

32. Shai Epstein

LB House / Shachar- Rozenfeld architects

© Shai Epstein © Shai Epstein

33. Joao Morgado

JA House / Filipe Pina + Maria Ines Costa 

© Joao Morgado © Joao Morgado

34. Quang Tran

Ccasa Hostel / TAK architects 

© Quang Tran © Quang Tran

35. Chris Warnes

Allen Key House / Architect Prineas 

© Chris Warnes © Chris Warnes

36. Andy Ryan

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects

© Andy Ryan © Andy Ryan

37. Vásquez Villegas

Energy Living / M+ Group 

© Vásquez Villegas © Vásquez Villegas

38. Liky Photos

Work-Studio in a Plant-House / O-office Architects 

© Liky Photos © Liky Photos

39. Jeremias Thomas

MeMo House / BAM! arquitectura 

© Jeremias Thomas © Jeremias Thomas

40. Chen Hao

The Qiyun Mountain Tree House / Bengo Studio 

© Chen Hao © Chen Hao

41. Hiroyuki Oki

Apartment in Binh Thanh / Sanuki Daisuke architects 

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

42. Imagen Subliminal

Córdoba-Flat / Cadaval & Solà-Morales 

© Imagen Subliminal © Imagen Subliminal

43. Yi Fan

Seclusive Jiangnan Boutique Hotel / gad 

© Yi Fan © Yi Fan

44. ASSISTANT

It Is A Garden / ASSISTANT

© ASSISTANT © ASSISTANT

45. URBANTAINER

Common Ground / URBANTAINER

Courtesy of URBANTAINER Courtesy of URBANTAINER

46. Dean Kaufman

Grace Farms / SANAA 

© Dean Kaufman © Dean Kaufman

47. art4d magazine / Ketsiree Wongwan

Forest House / Studio Miti 

© art4d magazine / Ketsiree Wongwan © art4d magazine / Ketsiree Wongwan

48. Peter Sexty

Breeze Mooloolaba / Tony Owen Partners 

© Peter Sexty © Peter Sexty

49. Beer Singnoi

Townhouse with Private Garden / baan puripuri 

© Beer Singnoi © Beer Singnoi

50. Amit Geron

Bare House / Jacobs-Yaniv Architects

© Amit Geron © Amit Geron

51. Gustav Willeit Guworld

Haus am Stürcherwald / Bernardo Bader Architekten 

© Gustav Willeit Guworld © Gustav Willeit Guworld

52. Takahiro Nedachi / Shawn Liu Studio

Hotel Proverbs Taipei / Ray Chen + Partners Architects 

© Takahiro Nedachi / Shawn Liu Studio © Takahiro Nedachi / Shawn Liu Studio

53. Mike Sinclair

Shelton Marshall Residence / El Dorado 

© Mike Sinclair © Mike Sinclair

54. Bitter Bredt

Denver Art Museum / Studio Libeskind 

© Bitter Bredt © Bitter Bredt

55. John Horner

Rock Creek House / NADAAA 

© John Horner © John Horner

56. Alan Williams

Backwater / Platform 5 Architects 

© Alan Williams © Alan Williams

57. Philippe Ruault

Seattle Central Library / OMA + LMN 

© Philippe Ruault © Philippe Ruault

58. Timothy Soar

Caroline Place / Amin Taha Architects + GROUPWORK 

© Timothy Soar © Timothy Soar

59. Raphael Olivier

Neo-Brutalist Revival /  Raphael Olivier

© Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier

60. Atelier Alter

The Paradise of Color / Atelier Alter 

Courtesy of Atelier Alter Courtesy of Atelier Alter

61. Filip Šlapal

The BLOX / DAM.architekti 

© Filip Šlapal © Filip Šlapal

62. Alexander James Photography

The Courtyard House / De Rosee Sa 

© Alexander James Photography © Alexander James Photography

63. Agnese Sanvito

Stone Helical Stair / Webb Yates Engineers & The Stonemasonry Company

© Agnese Sanvito © Agnese Sanvito

64. Mario Wibowo

Soori Bali / SCDA Architects 

© Mario Wibowo © Mario Wibowo

65. MCA Estúdio

LA House / Studio Guilherme Torres 

© MCA Estúdio © MCA Estúdio

66. NAARO

Villa Ypsilon / LASSA architects 

© NAARO © NAARO

67. Sergio Pirrone

Flying House / IROJE KHM Architects 

© Sergio Pirrone © Sergio Pirrone

68. J.Roc Design

Wooden Living-Roof / J.Roc Design

Courtesy of J.Roc Design Courtesy of J.Roc Design

69. Edward Hendricks

22 Toh Yi Road / Ming Architects 

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks

70. Mina

Eden Villa / xyz architects

© Mina © Mina

71. Åke E- son Lindman

Atrium House / Tham & Videgård Arkitekter 

© Åke E- son Lindman © Åke E- son Lindman

72. Iwan Baan

Beirut Terraces / Herzog & de Meuron 

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan

73. Michael Neuhaus

Residential House Cologne Hahnwald / Corneille Uedingslohmann Architekten 

© Michael Neuhaus © Michael Neuhaus

74. Doublespace Photography

The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi Architect 

© Doublespace Photography © Doublespace Photography

75. Héctor Armando Herrera

CSF House / López Duplan Arquitectos 

© Héctor Armando Herrera © Héctor Armando Herrera

76. Simón Garcia

Citylife Apartments / Zaha Hadid Architects 

© Simón Garcia © Simón Garcia

77. Katherine Lu

Dolls House / Day Bukh Architects 

© Katherine Lu © Katherine Lu

78. Nic Lehoux Photography

Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre / DIALOG 

© Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux

79. Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST 

Krøyer Square / Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects & COBE 

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj

80. Steve Troes

Boos Beach Club Restaurant / Metaform architects

© Steve Troes © Steve Troes

81. Doublespace Photography

Rosemary House / Kohn Shnier Architects

© Doublespace Photography © Doublespace Photography

82. Wissam Chaaya

Wadi Penthouse / Platau

© Wissam Chaaya © Wissam Chaaya

83. Tim van de Velde

CASWES / TOOP architectuur 

© Tim van de Velde © Tim van de Velde

84. Brett Boardman

Wellington on the Park / Fox Johnston 

© Brett Boardman © Brett Boardman

85. Himanshuu Sheth

The Dasavatara Hotel / SJK Architects 

© Himanshuu Sheth © Himanshuu Sheth

86. Derek Swalwell

Fitzroy Loft / Architects EAT 

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell

87. Hiroyuki Oki

Thong House / NISHIZAWAARCHITECTS

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

88. Stephen Goodenough

Urban Cottage / CoLab Architecture 

© Stephen Goodenough © Stephen Goodenough

89. K. Kopter

Oasia Hotel Downtown / WOHA 

© K. Kopter © K. Kopter

90. Vincent Monthiers

Eco-lodges Les Echasses / Patrick Arotcharen Architecte 

© Vincent Monthiers © Vincent Monthiers

91. Tina Nandi

Courtyard House / Abin Design Studio

© Tina Nandi © Tina Nandi

92. Fabrice Fouillet

DYEJI / Costa Lopes 

© Fabrice Fouillet © Fabrice Fouillet

93. Wison Tungthunya

Hubba-to / Supermachine Studio

© Wison Tungthunya © Wison Tungthunya

94. Adam Letch

Clifton House / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch

95. Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof

ARG Shopping Mall / ARSH 4D Studio 

© Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof © Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof

96. Alt Kat Photography

Levent House / COA Mimarlık 

© Alt Kat Photography © Alt Kat Photography

97. Sigurgeir Sigurgeirsson

B14 / Studio Granda 

© Sigurgeir Sigurgeirsson © Sigurgeir Sigurgeirsson

98. Maxime Brouillet

Le Banc de Neige / Atelier Pierre Thibault 

© Maxime Brouillet © Maxime Brouillet

99. Robert Polidori

Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport - Terminal 2 / SOM 

© Robert Polidori © Robert Polidori

100. Bajura Oleg

Piano House / LINE architects 

© Bajura Oleg © Bajura Oleg
Author: María Francisca González
Posted: August 19, 2017, 8:00 am

It’s hard to find a more difficult place for building a house than the peak of Mt. Sněžka. Wind speeds reach up to 250 km/h, winter temperatures hit record freezes, it is the most strictly protected zone of a national park.

© Andrea Thiel Lhotakova © Andrea Thiel Lhotakova
  • Architects: e-MRAK
  • Location: Sněžka, Czech Republic
  • Lead Architects: Martin Rajniš, Patrik Hoffman, Jan Mach, Tom Plzenský, David Kubík, Josef Franc
  • Area: 112.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Andrea Thiel Lhotakova
Courtesy of e-MRAK Courtesy of e-MRAK

From the architect. It’s hard to find a more difficult place for building a house than the peak of Mt. Sněžka. Wind speeds reach up to 250 km/h, winter temperatures hit record freezes, it is the most strictly protected zone of a national park.

Site Plan Site Plan

How to build in such a locality without spending excess money, and create a house that would remain in the minds of the people who visit? This building is a cousin of the storage depots of Amundsen’s or Scott’s polar expeditions or the houses that you see in Greenland or the Spitzbergen Islands.

Courtesy of e-MRAK Courtesy of e-MRAK

It enters on tiptoes into the national park: it is of wood and glass, standing on delicate metal supports. In the harshest winters, it is completely closed off behind interior insulation slabs – shadowboxes – and exterior blinds, which protect it from flying bits of rock and ice.

© Andrea Thiel Lhotakova © Andrea Thiel Lhotakova

Its outdoor staircase reminds you that you are climbing to the highest point of the Czech lands. An environmentally friendly wooden building, respecting nature, humanity, and the majesty of the mountains.

© Andrea Thiel Lhotakova © Andrea Thiel Lhotakova
Plan and Elevations Plan and Elevations
© Andrea Thiel Lhotakova © Andrea Thiel Lhotakova
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: August 19, 2017, 5:00 am

Two separate apartments for two families make up the volume which complies with the strict regulations of Riga historical center.

© Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja © Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja
  • Architects: NRJA
  • Location: Riga, Latvia
  • Lead Architects: Uldis Lukševics, Ivars Veinbergs, Zigmārs Jauja, Linda Leitāne-Šmīdberga
  • Area: 400.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja
© Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja © Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja

From the architect. Two separate apartments for two families make up the volume which complies with the strict regulations of Riga historical center.

Ground Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan
Facade Render 1 Facade Render 1
First Floor Plan First Floor Plan
Facade Render 2 Facade Render 2
Second Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

The height of the volume corresponds to the buildings across the street; the varying slopes of the roof react to the geometry of the nearby roofscape.

© Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja © Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja

The materials used for facades – black brick, painted timber boards and Rheinzink tin sheets – respond to the surrounding context of historical buildings.

Section Section

The tonality of used materials corresponds symbolically to the location – Ogļu (from latvian - Coal) Street.

© Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja © Gatis Rozenfelds - Zigmārs Jauja
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: August 19, 2017, 2:00 am