Events/News

Design Lab NightLifeNovember 2, 2017, 6:00pmNightLife at the California Academy of SciencesScience and art unite! NightLife partners with the @[14099958382:274:California College of the Arts] to explore the many ways design impacts lives, culture, and science.

Tickets: bit.ly/2ijveFd
Music by DJ Sake One

Explore innovative ideas in fields from industrial and interaction design to illustration and architecture when African Hall transforms into a gallery full of projects, games, and installations by CCA students.

At the Project Lab, learn about just a few of the ways that design and technology are used in the science lab with guests from UCSF, Stanford, and Abate Lab. They’ll show off their work with synthetic receptors, 3D-printed viruses, interspecies communication, and more.
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NIGHTLIFE TIPS:

- Last entry for our Rainforest dome is at 7:45 pm. Please note: drinks are not allowed inside the Rainforest exhibit.

- Planetarium passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Early event arrival is strongly recommended due to limited capacity and high demand for passes.

- Enjoy a different fresh seasonal "craft on draft" cocktail at each NightLife bar area. All bars accept cash and credit cards.

- A variety of food options are available at NightLife, including The Academy Café, The Terrace, and a food cart located in the front lobby.

- Special programs and lectures may have limited seating and admission will also be made available to visitors on a first-come, first-served basis.

- Programming lineup subject to change.
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Design Lab NightLife

6 hours ago

HEX: Hone & Explore with Innovative Design!October 14, 2017, 11:00am126 Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, United StatesInnovative Design presents HEX: Hone & Explore, a series of workshops where students come to learn and teach design!

Join us for three weekends of free, drop-in workshops for all skill levels! Come out to learn from and meet fellow design-minded bears. We also encourage auditing workshops of different skill levels and disciplines. Come in, hang out and observe the process.

Workshops run hourly from 11 AM - 4 PM on Sat Oct 14th, Sat October 21st, and Sat Oct 28th in 126 Barrows. No experience is necessary for interested students!

hex.innovativedesign.club/

Check this event page and the above website for workshop times and updates!!

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SATURDAY 10/14:

• Intro to Illustrator
• Low Poly Art
• UI/UX Portfolio Building
• Intro to InDesign
• Hand Lettering

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SATURDAY 10/21:

• Intro to Lightroom
• Intro to Film Photography
• Bullet Journaling
• HTML/CSS
• Designing Your Logo & Brand

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SATURDAY 10/28:

• Crafting an Effective Portfolio
• Web Game Design
• UI/UX Basic Design Principles
• Astrophotography
• Interactive Web Design

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All workshops are taught and led by Innovative Design members.
innovativedesign.club/
instagram.com/innodatcal
twitter.com/innodatcal
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HEX: Hone & Explore with Innovative Design!

6 days ago

The Big Ideas Contest has fostered student-led innovation on the UC Berkeley campus since 2005. The Contest, now open to all 10 University of California campuses, provides up to $300,000 in funding, skill-development and networks to students who have creative solutions to pressing social challenges. Among the eight categories in this year's contest is "Energy & Resource Alternatives" which should be of particular interest to CED students!

Application Deadline: 11/15/17 (12pm PT)

Learn more:
1. Information Session: Oct. 18, 6pm Blum Hall
2. Big Ideas Website: bigideas.berkeley.edu/
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3 weeks ago

Innovative Design Decal Infosession Fall 2017August 31, 2017, 6:30pm310 JacobsAPPLICATION: apply.innovativedesign.club


Ready to GET HANDS ON and learn new skills?

InnoD is back and ready for even more design education! This semester, we are offering our much-loved Intro to Photoshop and Illustrator, Graphic Design Principles, and Photography Principles decals.

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WHERE AND WHEN

This semester, due to high demand, we will have two back-to-back full identical info sessions in 310 Jacobs.

Info Session 1: Thursday August 31st 6:30 pm - 7:20 pm
Info Session 2: Thursday August 31st 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm

Both sessions will have the same information about all three decals. Due to safety regulations, we can only allow 130 people in 310 Jacobs at a time. Please line up early for the 6:30 session because we cannot guarantee admission when the room is full. You may be relegated to the 7:30 session.

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Applications, deadlines, and a rough course list will be discussed during the info session.


DeCal Times:
*Intro to Photoshop/Illustrator (4 sections): Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM
*Graphic Design Principles (1 section): Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM
*Photography Principles (2 sections): Tuesday 7:00-9:00PM; Wednesday 6:30-8:30PM


Check out the Intro course lessons at innovativedesign.club/decal

***Info session is mandatory for admission. If you absolutely cannot make it, please email us at innod.decal@gmail.com.***

If you already have experience under your belt, consider applying to Innovative Design and joining our graphic design, photography, or web design teams! We're hosting our club info session on Thursday 9/7 @ 8PM-9PM, location TBD. Event page here: tinyurl.com/yc3bpv2r

Visit our website at innovativedesign.club/ and like our Facebook page to stay updated!

Got a ~burning~ question? Email us as innod.decal@gmail.com
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Innovative Design Decal Infosession Fall 2017

2 months ago

Hello Everyone!! Design for America is back and ready for action! We are so excited to share everything we have in store with you and the UC Berkeley community.

If you want to join a group of incredibly diverse, passionate, interdisciplinary group of engineers, designers, and entrepreneurs keep reading!!!

Design for America (DFA) at UC Berkeley is a student-driven human-centered design studio. We integrate concepts from design thinking into ideation of solutions ultimately meant for social good. Every year, DFA members work on teams to co-create products, systems, and services for our community partners. Each team is focused on a different social issue that resonates with them and their community partner. We are one of 38 college studios nationwide.

This year our teams are focusing on optimizing free health care services with data and educating youth on food justice in the Bay Area!! Keep your eye out for a more detailed description on the teams and their leaders.

We have information sessions on Tuesday, September 5, 7-8PM and September 6, 5-6PM. Location is TBD but if you are interested in DFA and want some FREE dessert, come join us!!

Some cool things that you might experience while with DFA are:
- Collaboration with the most passionate, creative, and hardworking people
- Working on real social issues that mean something to you
- Being part of an entrepreneurial community that pushes you to do your best in any discipline or background that you come from, whether that be engineering, film, math, business, biology, or art
- Learning from the many awesome workshops that we'll be hosting this semester
- Giving back to the community that we live in

Our application will be open for fall 2017 recruitment 9/1, but in the meantime join us at one of our info sessions and at Calapalooza on 8/31 from 3-7 PM! Looking forward to meeting everyone!
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2 months ago

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Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 RecruitmentAugust 28, 2017, 8:00pmBerkeley InnovationBerkeley Innovation is UC Berkeley’s premier human-centered product design consultancy. Our consultants come from a wide range of disciplines, but we all share a love for design thinking and innovation.

Each semester, we work on design projects that give members hands-on experience with the entire design process, from conducting user research to building and marketing prototypes. Projects tackle contemporary, real-world issues for clients such as Quora, Westfield Malls, Indiegogo, and Ford Motors -- and range from UI/UX design to interaction design to physical device design.

We exist as a community for students who are interested in product design to develop their design skills and experience, and alumni have gone on to work for companies such as Khan Academy, Yelp, Google, Apple, and Facebook. We thrive at the intersection of technical feasibility, user desirability, and business viability.

Berkeley Innovation invites you to join us in designing the future.

Want to learn more? Come to our info sessions!

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RECRUITMENT TIMELINE

INFOSESSION #1
Wednesday, August 30 || 8:00 - 9:00 PM || Wheeler 120

INFOSESSION #2
Tuesday, September 5 || 6:00 - 7:00 PM || Jacobs 210

APPLICATION DUE
Thursday, September 7 || due 11:59 PM || tinyurl.com/BIFall2017

SOCIAL NIGHT (by invitation only)
Saturday, September 9 || 4:00 - 6:00 PM || Location TBA

INTERVIEW (by invitation only)
Sunday, September 10 || Location TBA

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Want to gain some human-centered design knowledge and experience before applying to Berkeley Innovation? Check out our Human-Centered {design.} DeCal! Learn more at the event page here: goo.gl/jsAmXf

If you have any other questions, shoot us an email at berkeley.innovation@gmail.com!
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Berkeley Innovation Fall 2017 Recruitment

2 months ago

Is this real?

Zinc
The amazing Gravitylight offers a ray of hope to millions without electricity
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3 months ago

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ArchDaily

ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwide

The site faces a main street lined with shops of various sizes in the center of Nagano. Since there are many schools in the area, children are often seen. This plan envisioned the renovation of a combination shop-and-residence that had stood on this site for more than 50 years. In addition to the function of a beauty shop, a wide range of other functions were also required, including living space, space for the sale of miscellaneous items, and an exhibition room, study room and event space for the community. Therefore, the aims were to secure flexibility responding to these diverse functions by removing the partition walls that had divided the structure into smaller spaces, and an open ceiling space by removing part of the floor of 2nd story. 

© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP
  • Architects: Poten-Poten
  • Location: 380-0802, Japan
  • Architects In Charge: Junki Kato, Kiyonori Sugiyama
  • Area: 68.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Kenta Hasegawa / OFP
  • Builder: MYROOM
© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP

From the architect. The site faces a main street lined with shops of various sizes in the center of Nagano. Since there are many schools in the area, children are often seen. This plan envisioned the renovation of a combination shop-and-residence that had stood on this site for more than 50 years. In addition to the function of a beauty shop, a wide range of other functions were also required, including living space, space for the sale of miscellaneous items, and an exhibition room, study room and event space for the community. Therefore, the aims were to secure flexibility responding to these diverse functions by removing the partition walls that had divided the structure into smaller spaces, and an open ceiling space by removing part of the floor of 2nd story. 

1st Floor Plan 1st Floor Plan

A nested spatial composition was created by constructing a “box,” finished in the Japanese shitami itabari style, inside the building. It functions as an eye-stop when seen from the street, while also giving a feeling of centrality to the single space created by removing the partition walls. The finish was not a simple binary concept of which parts of the existing building would be kept and which would be replaced. The aim was something in-between, so as to blend the contrast of old and new. Part of that “in-between treatment” was bleaching and sanding. In many places, the surface was marred by darkening due to stains and soiling over time, but it was possible to use the material itself. 

© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP
© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP

The existing members were examined closely from this viewpoint. The columns, beams, ceiling and fixtures were bleached, and the flooring was ground and sanded until these parts approached the condition of the base material. The same idea of “in-between treatment” was also applied to parts where deterioration with age and the old forms could not be completely eliminated. The entire atrium section was painted white, but the inevitable cracks and other flaws that occur with time were left in the beams, without attempting to fill them, and the some of the construction material, which gives the impression of having been an alcove, was left in the atrium.

© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP
Section Section
© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP

Considering the different activities in each of the spaces, the spaces were given distinctive characters by appropriate use of old materials that were left in the original state, new materials and materials that received “in-between treatment.”

© Kenta Hasegawa / OFP © Kenta Hasegawa / OFP


The conscious manipulation of the time possessed by space in this way created an arrangement of time that doesn’t exist, as though it was once real once.

Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: October 23, 2017, 7:00 pm

Located in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, the project called G-08 is based on the concept where the final user is the primary objective of architecture and for that reason the owner was studied in its entirety for several weeks, from its daily routines to its ideology and traditions; all with the aim of adapting the house to perfection according to his needs. Taking this into account, it was decided to design spaces plenty and full of natural light with walls in white color to generate sensations of purity; however it was not intended to make the house sober but warm, so that a family lives in and is fulfilled of life, therefore the use of vegetation of indoor gardens and patios in the interior and exterior, as well as woods in different types and tones.

© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea
© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea

From the architect. Located in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, the project called G-08 is based on the concept where the final user is the primary objective of architecture and for that reason the owner was studied in its entirety for several weeks, from its daily routines to its ideology and traditions; all with the aim of adapting the house to perfection according to his needs. Taking this into account, it was decided to design spaces plenty and full of natural light with walls in white color to generate sensations of purity; however it was not intended to make the house sober but warm, so that a family lives in and is fulfilled of life, therefore the use of vegetation of indoor gardens and patios in the interior and exterior, as well as woods in different types and tones.

© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea

Usually, the basement concept is classified as an isolated, gloomy and dark place where various articles and tools of little use are stored. In this case the basement has an outdoor patio which contains a water fountain where three trees are resting and filling natural light to this space framed by a concrete containment wall in which has a garage for 3 cars, gym, laundry room and a social area.

Section Section
Section Section

In the ground floor the visual is attracted to a staircase that surrounds an indoor garden with a tree that surpasses even the first floor. This staircase and the living room, which have a double height, are filled up by the natural light that enters by a large dome of tempered glass supported by metallic lattices.

© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea

The upper floor has a wooden floor in its entirety except for the wet areas, which for the owner was a fundamental necessity because for him the wood generates a visual comfort that helps him to rest and perceive the house warmer.

© Lorena Darquea © Lorena Darquea

As for the main facade, the use of volumes and materials give a character of hardness to the house, such is the case of the apparent concrete wall on the right side, which has a thickness of 35 cms and a height of 10 mts. In contrast, there is a wooden front wall showing a tree that, as in the interior, breaks with the coldness that might appear the materials.

Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: October 23, 2017, 5:00 pm

Blurring the public and private realms, TWO SHEDS engages an urban laneway.  With a flexible program and a growing neighbourhood, the project anticipates the future through architectural interventions. Re-imagining two ancillary buildings in east Vancouver, TWO SHEDS reconsiders formal conventions for the utilitarian building type. This distinction is complemented by a compositional and material selection that allows for future spatial and programmatic changes.

© Lori Kiessling © Lori Kiessling
  • Architects: Giaim
  • Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • Architect In Charge: Joey Giaimo
  • Area: 1200.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2700
  • Photographs: Lori Kiessling
  • Structural: Eric Man
  • Contractor: Smallworks
© Lori Kiessling © Lori Kiessling

From the architect. Blurring the public and private realms, TWO SHEDS engages an urban laneway.  With a flexible program and a growing neighbourhood, the project anticipates the future through architectural interventions. Re-imagining two ancillary buildings in east Vancouver, TWO SHEDS reconsiders formal conventions for the utilitarian building type. This distinction is complemented by a compositional and material selection that allows for future spatial and programmatic changes.

3d Views 3d Views

The context for the project is an odd assortment of light industrial and residential lots. The dimensions of the site are consistent with a lot module prominent throughout the eastern part of the city.  It is bound along its length by a flophouse on one side, an ice making factory on the other, and is capped at its ends by a public street and a laneway.  

© Lori Kiessling © Lori Kiessling

The main building on the site (an artist’s studio and home), is a discrete two-storey concrete block structure positioned adjacent to the public walk and blended in with the majority of low-rise industrial buildings lining the street. The owner required a shed structure, a no-nonsense raw space to be initially used for firewood and vehicular storage. These two storage programs could have been combined, but instead prompted two complementary sheds with a mediating space between - an informal courtyard - positioned firmly against the laneway.

Exploded Axo Exploded Axo

The sheds are unconventional in design but practical in material and assembly, drawing parallels to the character of the neighbourhood. Like the spaces, the assemblies and finishes are conditional, expecting subsequent alterations and modifications. The material palette consists of light wood framing and light gauge steel cladding on concrete footings.

© Lori Kiessling © Lori Kiessling

The simplicity of the program allowed for flexibility in the design’s expression. The structures broke down the lot, allowing for maximum flexibility for programming in the future. The variations in shed form is a playful juxtaposition of formal stereotypes, pitting the ubiquitous West Coast ninety-degree tilt against the angularity of contemporary architectural forms.  Developed through the use of simple 3D modeling, the project’s success is a result of a collaborative process, in dialogue with the contractors, to achieve simple, economical and buildable forms.

Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: October 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

The World Monuments Fund has announced their 2018 World Monuments Watch, highlighting 25 cultural sites from across the globe currently at risk due to economic, political or natural threats. Covering more than 30 countries and territories, these monuments represent sites of exceptional cultural value dating from prehistory to the 20th century.

India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Hall of Nations, a complex of exhibition halls built for the 1972 International Trade Fair, was demolished in April 2017. Ariel Huber, Lausanne/World Monuments Fund India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Hall of Nations, a complex of exhibition halls built for the 1972 International Trade Fair, was demolished in April 2017. Ariel Huber, Lausanne/World Monuments Fund

The World Monuments Fund has announced their 2018 World Monuments Watch, highlighting 25 cultural sites from across the globe currently at risk due to economic, political or natural threats. Covering more than 30 countries and territories, these monuments represent sites of exceptional cultural value dating from prehistory to the 20th century.

Some key themes  of this year’s list outlined by the World Monuments Fund include sites threatened due to:

  • Conflict (the Souk in Aleppo, Syria, a community hub burned during conflict; the al-Hadba’ Minaret in Mosul, Iraq, an historic landmark destroyed by ISIS; the Old City of Ta’izz in Yemen, an ancient city engulfed by war; and Sukur Cultural Landscape in Nigeria, a cultural landscape controlled by Boko Haram)
  • Disaster Response (Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico; the town of Amatrice, Italy, nearly entirely leveled by an earthquake in 2016)
  • Sites of Social Movement (Alabama Civil Rights Sites, locations important to the United State Civil Rights Movement of the 1950’s and 60’s)
  • Climate Change (Blackpool Piers, a historic seaside destination in the UK threatened by rising sea levels and strengthening storm surges)
  • Modern Sites (Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi, including works by notable Indian architects Charles Correa and Raj Rewal; Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium, a concrete sports hall in Japan designed by Kenzo Tange; the Sirius Building, a Brutalist public housing building in Sydney, Australia)
  • Cultural Landscapes (the Tebaida Leonesa, a series of once-isolated rural communities in Spain now overrun with tourism and development; the Ramal Talca-Constitución, Chile’s last-remaining rural passenger railway, recently damaged by forest fires; the Matobo Hills Cultural Landscape in Zimbabwe, one of the world's great rock art collections, also threatened by fire and deforestation)

“By building an international coalition, the World Monuments Watch protects both the sites themselves and the shared history they embody,” said Joshua David, President & CEO, WMF. “We may be best known for the excellence of our conservation practices, but the human impacts of our work ultimately mean the most. Sites like the 25 on the 2018 Watch are where we come together as citizens of the world and renew our commitments to justice, culture, peace, and understanding.”

The complete list includes:

Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico

Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico. Debris left by Hurricane Maria in Havana, Cuba, 2017. Sergei Montalvo Aróstegui/World Monuments Fund Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico. Debris left by Hurricane Maria in Havana, Cuba, 2017. Sergei Montalvo Aróstegui/World Monuments Fund
Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico. Damage caused by Hurricane Maria to Luis Muñoz Rivera Avenue, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2017. Jorge Iván Reyes/World Monuments Fund Disaster Sites of the Caribbean, the Gulf, and Mexico. Damage caused by Hurricane Maria to Luis Muñoz Rivera Avenue, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2017. Jorge Iván Reyes/World Monuments Fund

Government House, St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua and Barbuda, Government House. The main building of the Government House seen from the front, 2015. Philip Logan/World Monuments Fund Antigua and Barbuda, Government House. The main building of the Government House seen from the front, 2015. Philip Logan/World Monuments Fund

Sirius Building, Millers Point, Sydney, Australia

Australia, Sirius Building. The Sirius Building, seen from the north, 2016. Glenn Harper/World Monuments Fund Australia, Sirius Building. The Sirius Building, seen from the north, 2016. Glenn Harper/World Monuments Fund

Ramal Talca-Constitución, Talca Province, Chile

Chile, Ramal Talca-Constitución. Four historic railbuses run on the Talca-Constitución narrow-gage line, 2006. Erick Cespedes/ Wikimedia Commons/ World Monuments Fund Chile, Ramal Talca-Constitución. Four historic railbuses run on the Talca-Constitución narrow-gage line, 2006. Erick Cespedes/ Wikimedia Commons/ World Monuments Fund

Grand Theater, Prince Kung's Mansion, Beijing, China

China, Grand Theater, Prince Kung’s Mansion. An outdoor corridor runs along the west side of the Grand Theater, 2017. Yu Zhixin/World Monuments Fund China, Grand Theater, Prince Kung’s Mansion. An outdoor corridor runs along the west side of the Grand Theater, 2017. Yu Zhixin/World Monuments Fund

Eliyahu Hanavi Synagogue, Alexandria, Egypt

Egypt, Eliyahu haNavi Synagogue. Alexandria’s Eliyahu Hanavi Synagogue, seen from Nebi Daniel Street, 2012. Roland Unger/ Wikimedia Commons/ World Monuments Fund Egypt, Eliyahu haNavi Synagogue. Alexandria’s Eliyahu Hanavi Synagogue, seen from Nebi Daniel Street, 2012. Roland Unger/ Wikimedia Commons/ World Monuments Fund

Takiyyat of al-Gulshani, Cairo, Egypt

Egypt, Takiyyat Ibrahim al-Gulshani. The complex of al-Gulshani, seen from the northeast, showing how modern structures obscure the entrance façade, 2017. Matjaz Kacicnik/World Monuments Fund Egypt, Takiyyat Ibrahim al-Gulshani. The complex of al-Gulshani, seen from the northeast, showing how modern structures obscure the entrance façade, 2017. Matjaz Kacicnik/World Monuments Fund

Potager du Roi, Versailles, France

France, Potager du Roi. View across the central fountain in the Grand Carré towards the north, with a statue of Jean-Baptiste de La Quintinie and the cityscape beyond, 2015. Alexandre Petzold/World Monuments Fund France, Potager du Roi. View across the central fountain in the Grand Carré towards the north, with a statue of Jean-Baptiste de La Quintinie and the cityscape beyond, 2015. Alexandre Petzold/World Monuments Fund

Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi, India

India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Bahá’í House of Worship, known as the Lotus Temple (1986), is included on the World Heritage List, 2017. Shutterstock/ World Monuments Fund India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Bahá’í House of Worship, known as the Lotus Temple (1986), is included on the World Heritage List, 2017. Shutterstock/ World Monuments Fund
India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Jeevan Bharati (Life Insurance Corporation of India) Building (1986), designed by Charles Correa (1930-2015), 2017. INTACH Delhi/World Monuments Fund India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Jeevan Bharati (Life Insurance Corporation of India) Building (1986), designed by Charles Correa (1930-2015), 2017. INTACH Delhi/World Monuments Fund
India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The State Trading Corporation Building (1989) was designed by Raj Rewal, architect of the now-demolished Delhi Hall of Nations, 2017. INTACH Delhi/World Monuments Fund India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The State Trading Corporation Building (1989) was designed by Raj Rewal, architect of the now-demolished Delhi Hall of Nations, 2017. INTACH Delhi/World Monuments Fund

Al-Hadba' Minaret, Mosul, Iraq

Iraq, Al-Hadba’ Minaret. The al-Hadba’ Minaret, seen from the mosque before its destruction, 2009. Mosab Mohammed Jaseem/World Monuments Fund Iraq, Al-Hadba’ Minaret. The al-Hadba’ Minaret, seen from the mosque before its destruction, 2009. Mosab Mohammed Jaseem/World Monuments Fund

Lifta, Jerusalem, Israel

Israel, Lifta. The ruins of Lifta are now a popular destination for recreation, 2011. Nir Navot/ World Monuments Fund Israel, Lifta. The ruins of Lifta are now a popular destination for recreation, 2011. Nir Navot/ World Monuments Fund

Amatrice, Italy

Italy, Amatrice. The bell tower is an emblem of hope and resilience amid the devastation, 2017. MIBACT/World Monuments Fund Italy, Amatrice. The bell tower is an emblem of hope and resilience amid the devastation, 2017. MIBACT/World Monuments Fund

Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium, Takamatsu, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan

Japan, Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium. The Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium, seen from the southwest, was designed to evoke the form of a traditional Japanese wooden barge, 2014. Noriyuki Kawanishi/World Monuments Fund Japan, Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium. The Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium, seen from the southwest, was designed to evoke the form of a traditional Japanese wooden barge, 2014. Noriyuki Kawanishi/World Monuments Fund

Jewish Quarter of Essaouira, Morocco

Morocco, Jewish Quarter of Essaouira. Many structures in the Jewish Quarter are abandoned and crumbling, 2017. Amine Bennour/World Monuments Fund Morocco, Jewish Quarter of Essaouira. Many structures in the Jewish Quarter are abandoned and crumbling, 2017. Amine Bennour/World Monuments Fund

Sukur Cultural Landscape, Madagali Local Government Area, Nigeria

Nigeria, Sukur Cultural Landscape. Traditional Sukur houses are round clay buildings with thatched roofs, 2006. NCMM/Dipo Alafiatayo/ World Monuments Fund Nigeria, Sukur Cultural Landscape. Traditional Sukur houses are round clay buildings with thatched roofs, 2006. NCMM/Dipo Alafiatayo/ World Monuments Fund

Historic Karachi, Pakistan

Pakistan, Historic Karachi. The Nizam Mansion on the busy intersection of Muhammad Bin Qasim and Shahrah-e-Liaquat Roads has been abandoned and neglected for decades, 2011. HC-DAPNED/World Monuments Fund Pakistan, Historic Karachi. The Nizam Mansion on the busy intersection of Muhammad Bin Qasim and Shahrah-e-Liaquat Roads has been abandoned and neglected for decades, 2011. HC-DAPNED/World Monuments Fund

Cerro de Oro, Cañete Valley, Peru

Peru, Cerro de Oro. Aerial view of an excavated area at the southeast part of the hill, 2017. Francesca Fernandini/World Monuments Fund Peru, Cerro de Oro. Aerial view of an excavated area at the southeast part of the hill, 2017. Francesca Fernandini/World Monuments Fund

Tebaida Leonesa, El Bierzo, León, Spain

Spain, Tebaida Leonesa. The thirteenth-century Romanesque Church of San Pedro de Montes in Valdueza, seen from the north, 2015. Escuela del Patrimonio Cultural/World Monuments Fund Spain, Tebaida Leonesa. The thirteenth-century Romanesque Church of San Pedro de Montes in Valdueza, seen from the north, 2015. Escuela del Patrimonio Cultural/World Monuments Fund

Souk of Aleppo, Aleppo, Syria

Syria, Souk of Aleppo. A crossroads in the Souk of Aleppo before the fire, 2012. Ekaterina Zhuravleva/ Flickr/ World Monuments Fund Syria, Souk of Aleppo. A crossroads in the Souk of Aleppo before the fire, 2012. Ekaterina Zhuravleva/ Flickr/ World Monuments Fund

Chao Phraya River, Bangkok, Thailand

Thailand, Chao Phraya River. The Chao Phraya River as it winds through Bangkok, near the Grand Palace. Dario Lo Presti/ World Monuments Fund Thailand, Chao Phraya River. The Chao Phraya River as it winds through Bangkok, near the Grand Palace. Dario Lo Presti/ World Monuments Fund

Blackpool Piers, Blackpool, United Kingdom

United Kingdom, Blackpool Piers. The North Pier was the first pier at Blackpool, constructed using innovative screw pile engineering. Gidzy/ Flickr/ World Monuments Fund United Kingdom, Blackpool Piers. The North Pier was the first pier at Blackpool, constructed using innovative screw pile engineering. Gidzy/ Flickr/ World Monuments Fund

Buffalo Central Terminal, Buffalo, New York, United States

United States, Buffalo Central Terminal. The Buffalo Central Terminal complex includes an iconic Art Deco office tower, 2017. Joe Casico/World Monuments Fund United States, Buffalo Central Terminal. The Buffalo Central Terminal complex includes an iconic Art Deco office tower, 2017. Joe Casico/World Monuments Fund

Alabama Civil Rights Sites, Alabama, United States

United States, Alabama Civil Rights Sites. Old Ship A.M.E. Zion Church in Montgomery, a historic meeting place for black leaders, 2017. Laura Ewen Blokker, Southeast Preservation/World Monuments Fund United States, Alabama Civil Rights Sites. Old Ship A.M.E. Zion Church in Montgomery, a historic meeting place for black leaders, 2017. Laura Ewen Blokker, Southeast Preservation/World Monuments Fund

Old City of Ta’izz, Ta'izz, Yemen

Yemen, Old City of Ta’izz. The Mosque of al-Mudhaffar in the Old City of Ta’izz is a survivor of the Rasulid period, 2008. Pierre Blanchard/World Monuments Fund Yemen, Old City of Ta’izz. The Mosque of al-Mudhaffar in the Old City of Ta’izz is a survivor of the Rasulid period, 2008. Pierre Blanchard/World Monuments Fund

Matobo Hills Cultural Landscape, Matobo, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe, Matobo Hills Cultural Landscape. The grave of Cecil Rhodes in World’s View receives thousands of visitors each year, 2016. Stephen Battle/World Monuments Fund Zimbabwe, Matobo Hills Cultural Landscape. The grave of Cecil Rhodes in World’s View receives thousands of visitors each year, 2016. Stephen Battle/World Monuments Fund

Learn more about this year’s listed sites, here.

Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: October 23, 2017, 2:30 pm

The Autohaus is a car collectors’ garage and residence in central Texas. The design features compact living quarters, expressed as a single mass, floating above an open area for flexible gathering and automobile calibration/display. The second-floor volume is shifted forward to allow for double-height views to the garage space at the back while creating an everyday carport beneath the hovering bedchamber in the front.

© Charles Davis Smith © Charles Davis Smith
  • General Contractor: Risinger & Co
  • Structural Engineer: ARCH Consulting Engineers
  • First Floor Walls: Bautex Systems
  • Av: Smarter Homes
  • Logistic Support: Nitsche Events
© Casey Woods © Casey Woods

From the architect. The Autohaus is a car collectors’ garage and residence in central Texas. The design features compact living quarters, expressed as a single mass, floating above an open area for flexible gathering and automobile calibration/display. The second-floor volume is shifted forward to allow for double-height views to the garage space at the back while creating an everyday carport beneath the hovering bedchamber in the front.

© Charles Davis Smith © Charles Davis Smith
Plans Plans
© Casey Woods © Casey Woods

The twenty-foot cantilever is made possible by W30x116 steel beams, and a light-filled stairwell provides physical access between the two volumes. Custom-made steel and glass sliding doors open the living space to a large roof terrace surrounded by tree canopies, enabling indoor/outdoor living in an urban setting. 

© Charles Davis Smith © Charles Davis Smith

A collaborative design and construction process was key to the project. The Matt Fajkus Architecture team worked with the general contractor, Risinger Homes, to design, fabricate, and install the large custom steel doors and windows. A makeshift steel fabrication and paint shop were temporarily set up inside the partially-built garage during construction.

© Charles Davis Smith © Charles Davis Smith

The doors and windows were built in-house on the ground floor before their installation in its floating living quarters. This process allowed for greater quality control, high-end craftsmanship, full customization, and immediate installation, to produce a structure for a unique function and equally unique living experience.

© Perfecto Creative © Perfecto Creative
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: October 23, 2017, 1:00 pm

Herzog & de Meuron, with landscape architects Piet Oudolf and LOLA landscape architects, have revealed plans for a new residential development in the Stockholm neighborhood of Hjorthagen that will repurpose a series of historic gasholders. The project will represent HdM’s first built project in Sweden.

© Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties © Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties

Herzog & de Meuron, with landscape architects Piet Oudolf and LOLA landscape architects, have revealed plans for a new residential development in the Stockholm neighborhood of Hjorthagen that will repurpose a series of historic gasholders. The project will represent HdM’s first built project in Sweden.

© Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties © Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties

Located within the world’s first National Urban Park, Ekoparken, the formerly industrial area retains a sensation of remoteness from the city, despite it being within a short walking distance to the Ropsten subway station. The site is home to a number of 19th-century industrial buildings designed by architect Ferdinand Boberg, including two brick gasholders that will be preserved. The main architectural project will surround the two additional early 20th-century steel gasholders located on an adjacent hill.

With more significant cultural value, the structure of the older and smaller of the two gasholders will be largely preserved, with a new exhibition hall to be built inside. Meanwhile, the larger, 100-meter-tall gasholder will be transformed into a 90-meter-tall mixed-use residential tower containing 45 floors of apartments as well as a ground-floor art gallery. Elsewhere around the development will be a public cafe, bar, bakery, deli, shop and day-care center.

© Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties © Herzog & de Meuron / Oscar Properties
Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects

The tower’s design is spawned from the cylindrical form of the gasholder, altered in plan to provide all interior spaces with access to natural light and ventilation. A variety of apartment sizes will all be V-shaped in plan, separating bedroom and entertaining functions into wings each optimized for privacy and sun orientation.

Herzog & de Meuron describe the design as “a folding façade with slightly shifting facets that will create an iridescent image of the original gasholder tower.

Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects
Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects

The surrounding landscape by Piet Oudolf and LOLA will also be transformed to accommodate for resident and public functions, with meadows and flowing walkways taking advantage of the site’s unique connection to nature.

“The landscape design aims to give the gasometers a common natural ground as well as to add a member to the family: a beautiful meadow garden flanked by a stretched sun bench of 88 meters,” explain the designers. “Together with a plaza between the buildings and a serpentine walk connecting to the surrounding nature it forms the core of the design.”

Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects
Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects Courtesy of Piet Oudolf and LOLA Landscape Architects

The development will integrate into the larger Norra Djurgårdsstaden masterplan, a new community of residential, retail and commercial buildings planned to house as many as 10,000 residences.

News via Piet Oudolf & LOLA, Herzog & de Meuron, Oscar Properites.

Author: Patrick Lynch
Posted: October 23, 2017, 12:40 pm

The site is laid out along the shore of Lake Rupanco, on a southern facing slope, within a forest of Olivillo, Tepa and Coigue. Given the value of the tree species, the project is developed on the basis of integrating the required spaces within the layout of the existing trees.

Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda
  • Collaborators: Macarena Assadi, Brigitte Woodward, Daniel Reyes
Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda

From the architect. The site is laid out along the shore of Lake Rupanco, on a southern facing slope, within a forest of Olivillo, Tepa and Coigue. Given the value of the tree species, the project is developed on the basis of integrating the required spaces within the layout of the existing trees.

Floor Plan Floor Plan

The Project, a second home, is structured in three volumes grouped in two sets, both of which are laid out in a horizontal relation between the lake and forest along the length of the northern sun exposure. The first of these houses the access and common areas, while the other two contain the bedrooms grouped around a sunroom that features a tree from the century-old forest.

Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda

The use of large windows is defined in the proposal as understanding the forest as a first welcome space, where the internal circulation of the house enables “going out” toward hallways given completely to the landscape which then come back into the living spaces.

Schemes Schemes
Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda

Materiality consists of steel pilings and base over which the living structure is built in SIP panels, with a visible wooden structure. The dimensioning of walls and sills is determined by the size of the panels. Dimensioned pine was used for finishing and olivillo wood for furniture coverings.

Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda

In dealing with rain water, a hermetic volume is proposed, simple and without eaves that generate shadows and damp areas. The water runs off the tin roof and down the walls of the ventilated façade.

Section Section
Details Details

Special attention was given to specifically detailed design of the tin sheets, where a system continuously removes water toward the exterior: rooftop, façade-end finishing, upper and lower water traps on each sill, joint finishes, interior corner tinwork on all panel joints, as well as interior tin pre-frames for windows.

Cortesía de Sergio Araneda Cortesía de Sergio Araneda
Author: Cristobal Rojas
Posted: October 23, 2017, 11:00 am

All-nighters: the bane of all architecture students. The new academic year brings in an influx of fresh, enthusiastic architecture students alongside slightly more hardened veterans of the degree, and students of all experience levels are reminded of the unfortunate tendency for work to stretch through the night. It's an easy habit to slip into for both students and even those working in practice; however many times we may tell ourselves at the end of a project that we will be more organized next time, the work always piles up and it seems like the only option – but it’s not!

© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

All-nighters: the bane of all architecture students. The new academic year brings in an influx of fresh, enthusiastic architecture students alongside slightly more hardened veterans of the degree, and students of all experience levels are reminded of the unfortunate tendency for work to stretch through the night. It's an easy habit to slip into for both students and even those working in practice; however many times we may tell ourselves at the end of a project that we will be more organized next time, the work always piles up and it seems like the only option – but it’s not!

With architecture holding the title for the degree that works the longest hours, it is important to maintain a healthy work-life balance throughout. If you feel that you are falling into the trap of staying up until 6am every day then this article should prevent any further sleep deprivation. With advice taken from several architecture students with years of experience dodging the twilight hour, this list will guide you on your way to enough sleep and decent grades.

1. Be Realistic With Your Goals

Giving yourself impossible deadlines will only demotivate you and stress you out further. Understand that plans and models don't happen in a couple of hours, they can take days. Once you have grasped the actual time frames of tasks, your time management will be a lot more efficient.

2. Wake Up Earlier

This coincides with getting enough sleep, but assuming you can get out of bed, it will offer you a time of day where there are few distractions and you are at your most productive. One way to do this is to have your breakfast once you are at the studio to save time in the morning.

3. Prepare Your Meals

© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

In the weeks running up to a deadline, have your freezer stocked full of frozen meals that can be quickly popped in the microwave. Batch cooking will be a savior in both time and money, so invest in that Tupperware!

4. Aim To Finish Early

Dedicate a few days prior to the final deadline for uncompleted tasks. It is likely that you have been over-optimistic with your time frames and this gives you the space to overrun without sacrificing too much sleep.

5. Don't Always Take What The Professor Says Seriously

This one's a controversial point, but if you are told to change your scheme a few days before the deadline use your initiative and work out whether it is worth the whole new set of drawings.

6. Take A Step Back

© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

Realize when enough is enough. How much will another drawing add to your project and are you just wasting time on something less important than what has been asked of you?

7. Look After Your Body Clock

Don't slip into the habit of going to bed late and waking up late every day. Even if you believe you work better in the evening, be reasonable with when you call it a night.

8. Use Every Spare Minute

If you have ten minutes spare between lectures or you are waiting for your computer to load, use that time to whip up a quick development diagram or put together some words on your design to use in your coursework.

9. Make Your Breaks More Effective

© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

Incorporating relaxing activities into your breaks such as a brisk walk/run or yoga will give your head some space from your work for a while, so you can come back to it with a new mindset and increased productivity.

10. Collate Your Work Early

During the entire project, constantly put together your coursework into presentation sheets so you are not developing the layout, text, and images at the last minute.

11. Work With Friends

Friends with the same deadline will provide the strong working environment to motivate you. This gives you the opportunity to evaluate your progress in relation to theirs and keeps you on track.

12. Get Some Sleep

© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

Notice when you are working slower and go to sleep. There is no point staying awake for hours finishing off something that will take half the time in the morning.

13. Plan Your Coursework

Avoid unnecessary work by figuring out early on what you want to include in your crit and coursework so you are only doing the drawings that you will need to refer to.

Images for this article were kindly provided by Andrea Vasquez.

For and Against All-Nighter Culture: ArchDaily Readers Respond

In 2015, ArchDaily asked its readers to reflect on the pros and cons of architecture's culture of long hours. Read what they had to say here.

Author: Ella Thorns
Posted: October 23, 2017, 9:30 am

Inspired by the pulse of Chicago’s artistic energy, Apple has created a new platform for performance in a city charged by music. Located at the intersection of the Chicago River and North Michigan Avenue’s ‘Magnificent Mile’, Apple Michigan Avenue cascades down from Pioneer Court to the river’s edge, creating new connections between the city and the river.

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young
  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Location: 401 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL, United States
  • Area: 20000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Nigel Young
© Nigel Young © Nigel Young

From the architect. Inspired by the pulse of Chicago’s artistic energy, Apple has created a new platform for performance in a city charged by music. Located at the intersection of the Chicago River and North Michigan Avenue’s ‘Magnificent Mile’, Apple Michigan Avenue cascades down from Pioneer Court to the river’s edge, creating new connections between the city and the river.

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young

The project reflects Apple’s commitment to the cities and communities it inhabits, and is the result of a close collaboration between the design team at Apple led by chief design officer, Sir Jonathan Ive and Angela Ahrendts, senior vice president of Retail and Online Stores and Foster + Partners.

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young

Sir Jonathan Ive said, “Apple Michigan Avenue is about removing boundaries between inside and outside, reviving important urban connections within the city. It unites a historic city plaza that had been cut off from the water, giving Chicago a dynamic new arena that flows effortlessly down to the river.”

Ground Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan

Pioneer Court is an urban plaza steeped in Chicago history. It is the spot where Point de Sable – the founding father of Chicago – first lived and worked. Apple Michigan Avenue sits atop a wide new public stair, created to lead down from the plaza to the river. The gentle descent of levels creates active spaces where people can connect, create, and experience the city and river together.

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young

The stairway transitions seamlessly between the outside and inside. It passes through the building’s walls – dematerialized to pure glass – and connects to the store’s buzzing center, sheltered by an impossibly thin carbon fiber roof, supported on slender stainless-steel columns. As the interior steps down to the river, it acts as a seating space around the Forum – the hub of Today at Apple and a live source of creativity, education and entertainment.

Section Section
© Nigel Young © Nigel Young
North and East Elevation North and East Elevation

Stefan Behling, Head of Studio, Foster + Partners said: “We fundamentally believe in great urban life, creating new gathering places, and connecting people in an analog way within an increasingly digital world. The design of Apple Michigan Avenue embodies this in its structure and materiality with a glass wall that dissolves into the background, revealing the only visible element of the building – its floating carbon fiber roof.”

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young
Author: Diego Hernández
Posted: October 23, 2017, 9:00 am

Even though a solid majority of architectural visualizations adhere to similar style guidelines, that doesn't mean you have to follow suit. Unless, of course, you want to (or your boss is forcing you). Either way, there are many resources out there to help you create visualizations in any style you want, and we've compiled 13 super-useful sites to help you give your unbuilt creations a human—or canine—touch. The number of sites dedicated to representing the diversity of the world's 7.6 billion inhabitants is growing, which means that our readers from outside of the Nordic countries have solid, appropriate options for populating their renderings. And if you're in the market for something edgier than the painstakingly-cut photo of a real person, sites like ARTCUTOUT and cutoutmix provide less realistic, more artistic alternatives.   

Even though a solid majority of architectural visualizations adhere to similar style guidelines, that doesn't mean you have to follow suit. Unless, of course, you want to (or your boss is forcing you). Either way, there are many resources out there to help you create visualizations in any style you want, and we've compiled 13 super-useful sites to help you give your unbuilt creations a human—or canine—touch. The number of sites dedicated to representing the diversity of the world's 7.6 billion inhabitants is growing, which means that our readers from outside of the Nordic countries have solid, appropriate options for populating their renderings. And if you're in the market for something edgier than the painstakingly-cut photo of a real person, sites like ARTCUTOUT and cutoutmix provide less realistic, more artistic alternatives.   

escalalatina

ARTCUTOUT

pngimg.com

SKALGUBBAR

NONSCANDINAVIA

CUTOUT LIFE

SKALGUBBRASIL

MRCUTOUT.COM

cutoutmix

Ronen Bekerman & Case3D

XOIO AIR

3NTA

IMMEDIATE ENTOURAGE (FREEMIUM)

A Library of Downloadable Architecture Drawings in DWG Format

Looking for some quick references or ways to spice up your drawings? Fire up Google Translate or brush the dust off your Italian to take advantage of this comprehensive vector/dwg/architecture drawing resource site! provides a number of free CAD blocks, downloadable CAD plans and DWG files, for you to study or use in precedent research.

LineCAD Offers Solid Collection of Free Architecture CAD Blocks (No Strings Attached)

The people have spoken and the message is clear: "We want CAD blocks, reference drawings in DWG format and templates of all kinds!" Well, feast your eyes on this latest discovery, www.linecad.com. The site is a catch-all for downloadable DWGs and blocks whose scope even goes beyond architecture.

Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: October 23, 2017, 8:00 am

Snøhetta have revealed designs for Europe's first underwater restaurant in the coastal village of Båly, in Norway. The structure, which also houses a marine life research center, teeters over the edge of a rocky outcrop, semi-submerged in the ocean. Built from concrete, the monolithic structure will come to rest on the sea bed five meters below the water's surface; here, it will "fuse" with the ecosystem of the concealed shoreline. Below the waterline, the restaurant’s enormous acrylic windows will frame a view of the seabed.

© MIR and Snøhetta © MIR and Snøhetta

Snøhetta have revealed designs for Europe's first underwater restaurant in the coastal village of Båly, in Norway. The structure, which also houses a marine life research center, teeters over the edge of a rocky outcrop, semi-submerged in the ocean. Built from concrete, the monolithic structure will come to rest on the sea bed five meters below the water's surface; here, it will "fuse" with the ecosystem of the concealed shoreline. Below the waterline, the restaurant’s enormous acrylic windows will frame a view of the seabed.

© MIR and Snøhetta © MIR and Snøhetta

The sleek, streamlined form of the building is encapsulated in a concrete shell with a coarse surface that invites mussels to cling on. Over time, as the mollusk community densifies, the submerged monolith will become an artificial mussel reef that functions dually to rinse the sea and naturally attract more marine life to its purified waters.

© MIR and Snøhetta © MIR and Snøhetta

According to the designers, parts of the restaurant will be dedicated to a marine biology research outside of the restaurant's opening hours. "Researchers from Norwegian research centers will seek to train wild fish with sound signals, and will study whether fish behave differently throughout different seasons." The researchers will also help to optimize conditions on the seabed so that fish and shellfish can thrive in proximity to the restaurant.

© MIR and Snøhetta © MIR and Snøhetta

As visitors begin their journey through the restaurant they descend through three levels. From the entrance, where the tidepool is swallowed by the sea, guests enter the wardrobe area. Visitors are then ushered down one level to the champagne bar, which marks the transition between the shoreline and the ocean. From the bar, guests can also look down at the seabed level of the restaurant, where two long dining tables and several smaller tables are placed in front of the large panoramic window.

© MIR and Snøhetta © MIR and Snøhetta
Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: October 23, 2017, 6:45 am

One of the United States' leading architects of the Modernist era, Paul Marvin Rudolph (October 23, 1918 – August 8, 1997) was known for his contributions to modernism throughout the latter half of the 20th century. He served as the Chair of Yale University’s School of Architecture for six years and famously designed the Yale Art and Architecture Building, one of the earliest examples of Brutalist architecture in the United States.

University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth

One of the United States' leading architects of the Modernist era, Paul Marvin Rudolph (October 23, 1918 – August 8, 1997) was known for his contributions to modernism throughout the latter half of the 20th century. He served as the Chair of Yale University’s School of Architecture for six years and famously designed the Yale Art and Architecture Building, one of the earliest examples of Brutalist architecture in the United States.

Image <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010648334/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain) Image <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010648334/'>via the Library of Congress</a> (public domain)

Born in Elkton, Kentucky, Rudolph spent most of his youth in Alabama and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Architecture from Alabama Polytechnic Institute (now Auburn University) in 1940. After working for a year in Alabama, he briefly attended Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design where he studied under Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. He spent his formative years at Harvard, studying alongside many other preeminent architects of the 20th century including IM Pei and Philip Johnson. He then left school for three years, spending World War II at the Brooklyn Navy Yard before returning to Harvard and graduating with his master’s in 1947.

Rudolph Building (formerly known as the Art and Architecture Building) at Yale University. Image © Peter Aaron / Esto Rudolph Building (formerly known as the Art and Architecture Building) at Yale University. Image © Peter Aaron / Esto

After graduation, he moved to Florida where he became one of the most famous architects of The Sarasota School of Architecture, a regional post-war style that is characterized by its careful consideration of local climate and terrain. After working for four years with Ralph Twitchell, Rudolph started his own practice in 1951 and garnered a reputation for his Florida houses. By the late 1950s, he began receiving commissions for larger projects, simultaneously beginning his term as dean of the Yale School of Architecture in 1958 where he taught notable architects including Muzharul Islam, Norman Foster, and Richard Rogers.

Orange County Government Center. Image © Matthew Carbone for Architect Magazine Orange County Government Center. Image © Matthew Carbone for Architect Magazine

Although he is most often recognized for his concrete structures, when Brutalism fell out of favor in the United States during the 1970s, his style evolved. During this period he designed numerous glass office towers around the world, including the Lippo Centre Station of MTR in Hong Kong. Although his career in the United States began a slow decline in the 1970s, his large-scale projects in Southeast Asia brought him international attention. 

Bass Residence. Image © Tony Monk Bass Residence. Image © Tony Monk

Paul Rudolph is remembered for his landmark buildings across the globe as well as his career-spanning archive, which was donated to the Library of Congress. At the time of his death, he also donated all of his intellectual property rights to the American people, a gift which helped to establish the Center for Architecture, Design, and Engineering at the Library of Congress.

The Colonnade Condominiums. Image © Cooney-Hughes The Colonnade Condominiums. Image © Cooney-Hughes

Learn more about some of Paul Rudolph’s most notable projects via the thumbnails below:

Preservationists Lose Battle to Save Orange County Government Center

See Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center Dismantled Over 4 Seasons With These Photos

References: Wikipedia

Author: Evan Rawn
Posted: October 23, 2017, 6:00 am

Architectural – urbanistic intentions and conception
While searching for architectural and urbanistic conception, we were trying to create simple and rational structure from the functionality, construction and exploitation point of view. Also, to find suitable, subtle relation with spaces of neighboring old town and Reformatai square.

© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj
  • Architects: Paleko architektu studija
  • Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
  • Lead Architects: Rolandas Palekas, Alma Palekienė, Bartas Puzonas, Dalia Uogintė, Sandra Šlepikaitė
  • Area: 4000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Norbert Tukaj
  • Constructors: G.Lietvaitis, K.Veteris
  • Client: UAB Eika
© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj

Architectural – urbanistic intentions and conception
While searching for architectural and urbanistic conception, we were trying to create simple and rational structure from the functionality, construction and exploitation point of view. Also, to find suitable, subtle relation with spaces of neighboring old town and Reformatai square.

© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj
Situation Situation
© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj

Conception was determined by the location and context of the site: former residential site function was recreated; historically formed site terrain character was not changed – buildings are composed in different levels; pitched roofs were designed taking into account old town silhouette.

First floor plan First floor plan

Structure of the spaces, volumetric solutions
In order to achieve integrity, we chose several architectural-compositional denominators. First – three volumes of the same profile. Second – all of the three houses are similar to each other in size in the plan, and house by the park is one floor lower than the two other buildings.

© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj

After estimating the scale and structures of adjacent and neighboring territories, in order to articulate the northern layout of J.Basanavicius street, new building forms perimetrical occupation of the plot by the street, while closer to the park villa morphotype is chosen. The building by the Reformatai square is slightly turned in relation to the middle building, in this way enhancing the city villa character.

Diagram Diagram

Facades and finishing materials
In the facade solutions, several important principles that are inherent to Vilnius old town are reflected:
1. Regular and harmonious window arrangement;
2. Rather high fence that enhances the perimetrical occupation of the plot by the main street;

© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj

3. Firewall – solid massive building wall. Inner structure of the building plan is inherent to the building facades – window openings, balconies are arranged in a way so it would assure good functionality of inner structure, size of the windows assures sufficient lighting and insolation. Tall windows, that are matched to the window scale neighboring eclectic buildings window, open up the panoramas and let in more sunlight.

Section BB Section BB

Color and material – contextual, modern, durable and natural. Taking into account dominating building material in J.Basanavicius street, light plaster was used for the buildings by the street; reacting to the natural park colors and seasonality, dark grey wood was used for the building by the park. All of the balconies are covered by the same material as the facade.

© Norbert Tukaj © Norbert Tukaj
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: October 23, 2017, 5:01 am

YAC – Young Architects Competitions – and Centergross launch “Italian Fashion Hub”, an architectural competition to redevelop a multi-service area of the wider fashion district in Europe. A cash prize of € 20,000 will be awarded to the winners selected by an internationally-renowned jury made by, among the others, Patrik Schumacher (Zaha Hadid Architects), Ben Gilmartin (Diller Scofidio + Renfro), Marie Hesseldahl (3XN), Aurélien Coulanges (Ateliers Jean Nouvel).

Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions

YAC – Young Architects Competitions – and Centergross launch “Italian Fashion Hub”, an architectural competition to redevelop a multi-service area of the wider fashion district in Europe. A cash prize of € 20,000 will be awarded to the winners selected by an internationally-renowned jury made by, among the others, Patrik Schumacher (Zaha Hadid Architects), Ben Gilmartin (Diller Scofidio + Renfro), Marie Hesseldahl (3XN), Aurélien Coulanges (Ateliers Jean Nouvel).

Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions

Fashion is increasingly becoming a global phenomenon. Alongside the historic brands that have created the made in Italy legend, other giants have emerged. Such new companies have managed to meet the urgent need to create excellent products at an affordable price. They are the fast fashion companies, giants and artisans, which have endorsed the features of speed and dynamism that are part of the contemporary society.

Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions

The future of fashion is in speed. If fast fashion has its own capital in Europe, such place is- without any doubt- Centergross. Centergross is located on international transportation roads. It's comprised of one million square meters of office space, showrooms, and warehouses. Centergross is one of the most important groups of fashion companies at a global level. It is a titan with staggering figures: 6,000 workers, 700 companies, and 10,000 daily visits. It is a fashion citadel with stylists, models, buyers, and businessmen. Every day this army designs, purchases and provides the market with collections and accessories generating a 5 billion euros turnover.

The original project is still highly functional. On the contrary, the importance and centrality as fashion citadel acquired by Centergross are no longer consistent with a facility starting to bear the marks of the ravages of time. For these reasons, 40 years after its foundation, Centergross decided to let designers redesign its most representative building: the service area. It is a 1-kilometer area with restaurants, wellness centers, offices and hundreds of shops. As if they were a huge lymphatic system, they supply the whole fashion district with services.

Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions
Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions

Which identity to offer- through architecture- the biggest fashion citadel of the international scenario? How to make the most of such large intervention scale to create a monument to Italian fashion? These are the questions of Italian Fashion Hub, the competition by YAC and Centergross aiming to give the capital of the European Fast Fashion a new look.

Oma and Prada, Chipperfield and Valentino, Ito and Tod’s: the bond between fashion and architecture is strong. Today, this connection is renewed thanks to Italian Fashion Hub. Through this competition, designers will have the opportunity to work with an unprecedented intervention scale. As the most important design brands, they will have the chance to leave a mark in the history of contemporary architecture offering their creativity to one of the most demanding and refined pillars of the global economy: fashion.

Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions Courtesy of Young Architects Competitions

Jury:

Prizes:

  • 1st PRIZE 10.000 €
  • 2nd PRIZE 4.000 €
  • 3rd PRIZE 2.000 €
  • 4 GOLD MENTIONS 1.000 € each
  • 10 HONORABLE MENTIONS 
  • 30 FINALISTS

Calendar:

  • 23/10/2017 “early bird” registration – start
  • 26/11/2017 (h 11.59 pm GMT) “early bird” registration – end
  • 27/11/2017 “standard” registration – start
  • 21/12/2017 (h 11.59 pm GMT) “standard” registration – end
  • 22/12/2017 “late” registration – start
  • 28/01/2018 (h 11.59 pm GMT) “late” registration – end
  • 31/01/2018 (h 12.00 pm – midday - GMT) material submission deadline
  • 05/02/2018 jury summoning
  • 05/03/2018 results announcement

More information on www.youngarchitectscompetitions.com
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Author: Rene Submissions
Posted: October 23, 2017, 5:00 am

The Latvian Ministry of Culture have announced Together and Apart: 100 Years of Living as the theme of the Latvian Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. Urbanist Evelīna Ozola, architect Matīss Groskaufmanis, scenographer Anda Skrējānem, and Director of the New Theatre Institute of Latvia Gundega Laiviņa will highlight "ideological turning points from the last one hundred years," presenting ways in which "architectural projects and processes of apartment blocks have embodied different ideas about living together and building a nation."

© Ieva Raudsepa © Ieva Raudsepa

The Latvian Ministry of Culture have announced Together and Apart: 100 Years of Living as the theme of the Latvian Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. Urbanist Evelīna Ozola, architect Matīss Groskaufmanis, scenographer Anda Skrējānem, and Director of the New Theatre Institute of Latvia Gundega Laiviņa will highlight "ideological turning points from the last one hundred years," presenting ways in which "architectural projects and processes of apartment blocks have embodied different ideas about living together and building a nation."

Latvian Curatorial Team (2018 Venice Architecture Biennale). Image © Lauris Aizupietis Latvian Curatorial Team (2018 Venice Architecture Biennale). Image © Lauris Aizupietis

According to the curators, the pavilion will "focus on apartment buildings as an architectural category that simultaneously offers life together and apart. [...] Even though the apartment makes it possible to separate from the outside world, it is always part of a common structure." Almost two thirds of Latvian residents live in apartment buildings, the second highest ratio in Europe.

Our intention is to raise the issue of how to live together in today’s increasingly complex society and how the architecture of apartment buildings can provide it. In the exhibition, we want to highlight the parts of the apartment building that cannot be reduced to a private sphere and an individual apartment – staircases, balconies, courtyards, partition walls and other fragments, which in the architectural theory and contemporary periodicals most often remain in the second plan of analysis, but clearly demonstrate the current ideals of the society and influence the forming of common values.

Inside "The Baltic Pavilion" at the 2016 Venice Biennale

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show. Architecture deals not only with form. It is about data and material flows, the organization of resources, the mobilization of capacities; it organizes not only static things, but it is also a design of processes.

Author: AD Editorial Team
Posted: October 23, 2017, 4:00 am

Soaring 828 meters above the metropolis of Dubai, the Burj Khalifa is the world’s tallest building. The design for the 162-story tower combines local cultural influences with cutting-edge technology to achieve high performance in an extreme desert climate. 

Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM
  • Architects: SOM
  • Location: 1 Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Blvd - Dubai - United Arab Emirates
  • Area: 454249.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Nick Merrick-Hedrich Blessing
  • Structural Engineering: SOM
  • Mep: SOM
  • Interior Design: SOM
  • General Contractor: Samsung Corporation / Dubai Contracting Company LLC
  • Construction Manager: : Turner International
  • Acoustical / Audio Visual / Telecommunications: Pelton Marsh Kinsella
  • External Water Features: Crystal Fountains 8 Elevators: Lerch, Bates & Associates Inc.
  • Fire & Life Safety: The RJA Group, Inc.
  • Facade Maintenance: Lerch, Bates & Associates Inc., Facade Access Consulting, Citadel Consulting
  • Food Service: Trend Foodservice Design
  • Geotechnical: Hyder International
  • Graphics: emerystudio
  • Interior Water Features And Pools: PA EMS, Ltd.
  • Landscape: Cracknell Landscape Design LLC
  • Lighting: Fisher Marantz Stone
  • Parking: Walker Parking
  • Security Systems: Sinclair Knight Merz Consulting
  • Surveying: Emirates Nortech Surveys
  • Wind Engineering: RWDI Inc.
Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM

From the architect. Soaring 828 meters above the metropolis of Dubai, the Burj Khalifa is the world’s tallest building. The design for the 162-story tower combines local cultural influences with cutting-edge technology to achieve high performance in an extreme desert climate. 

Diagram Diagram

The centerpiece of a large mixed-use development, the Burj Khalifa contains offices, retail space, residential units, and a Giorgio Armani hotel. A Y-shaped floor plan maximizes views of the Arabian Gulf. At ground level, the skyscraper is surrounded by green space, water features, and pedestrian-friendly boulevards.

Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM

The tower’s overall design was inspired by the geometries of a regional desert flower and the patterning systems embodied in Islamic architecture. Built of reinforced concrete and clad in glass, the tower is composed of sculpted volumes arranged around a central buttressed core. As the tower rises from a flat base, setbacks occur in an upward spiraling pattern, reducing the building’s mass as it reaches skyward. At the pinnacle, the central core emerges and forms a spire. 

Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM
Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM
Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM

Beyond its record-breaking height, the Burj Khalifa incorporates new structural and construction efficiencies to reduce material usage and waste. These include a “sky-sourced” ventilation system, in which cool, less humid air is drawn in through the top of the building. The tower also has one of the largest condensate recovery systems in the world.

Courtesy of SOM Courtesy of SOM
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: October 23, 2017, 3:00 am

Coffee being native and important to Coorg District, the coffee shop at Ibnii was conceived to be a sacred spot in the whole 120 acres of resort site. The creation of the site was as crucial as the design of the building itself. The location was carefully chosen near an existing pond in the valley between three hills. This pond was enlarged to five-folds its size to form a large lake. There existed a rectangular plinth from an old demolished concrete block manufacturing unit. The building uses this platform as its plinth and only a flying roof is added to emphasize the dramatic views from this location.

© Harsh Patel © Harsh Patel
  • Master Planning, Structura, Hvac: Abdul Hameed Consultants Pvt Ltd.
  • Civil Contractor: KAP Constructions
  • Landscape Designer: Anjana Bhagyanathan
  • Structural Glass: Excel
  • Client: IBNII Resort
© Ravindra Kanade © Ravindra Kanade

From the architect. Coffee being native and important to Coorg District, the coffee shop at Ibnii was conceived to be a sacred spot in the whole 120 acres of resort site. The creation of the site was as crucial as the design of the building itself. The location was carefully chosen near an existing pond in the valley between three hills. This pond was enlarged to five-folds its size to form a large lake. There existed a rectangular plinth from an old demolished concrete block manufacturing unit. The building uses this platform as its plinth and only a flying roof is added to emphasize the dramatic views from this location.

Ground Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan

The monolithic concrete roof is medially anchored, its cantilevered edges sloping upwards in opposite directions celebrating an intimate relationship between the encompassing hills and the lake in front. This low-slung flying roof with the upturned beams offers a clear concrete surface from the interior. By locating the thin linear columns towards the center and keeping the edges free, the roof which defines the identity of this pavilion appears to rest lightly on the frameless glass façade edge that envelopes the pavilion in front. From the central supports, the roof cantilevers up to 7 mts outwards in the front.

© Ravindra Kanade © Ravindra Kanade

The approach to the building is deliberately taken all the way around the water body to arrive through the rear of the building. It is only after arriving inside of the coffee pavilion that the visitor has revealed the breathtaking view through the full-faced glass wall. Fixed in the center of this delicate glass façade, is the heavy wooden door to emphasize and frame the ceremonious exit from the inside to the outside. The exterior deck with its original curing tanks are reused as coffee drying yards, and the hard landscape around is interspersed with coffee plants.

© Ravindra Kanade © Ravindra Kanade

The interior floor is cladded with a local stone,’mandana’ which is coffee colored and laid as if woven to form a carpet to contrast with the stark concrete roof slab. The design objective for the coffee shop was to make minimal interventions on its landscape and to ensure that the built only enhanced the natural beauty of the site rather than overshadow it. The pavilion by itself is reduced to the bare minimum, in its simplest form, without taking anything away from the landscape.

Exploded View Exploded View
Author: Daniel Tapia
Posted: October 23, 2017, 2:00 am

It is located in the south of the square of Benxi Museum. This building is both the local art gallery for cultural exhibiting purpose and the center for artists’ working and communication. The center contains 4 floors above ground and a basement floor. The interior space of the first and basement floor joining the exterior through the sunken yard, generates an individual and welcoming shared space for art exhibiting. The second, third and fourth floor are mainly used for working, art creating and meeting. The hovering and stagger public staircase connects each floor, while showing its multiple forms from basement to top.

© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi
  • Architects: TAOA
  • Location: Yu Ming Lu, Mingshan Qu, Benxi Shi, Liaoning Sheng, China
  • Architect In Charge: Lei Tao
  • Design Team: Bozhou Kang, Zhen Chen
  • Area: 4000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Xia Zhi
  • Collaborators: The Eigth Design Department of China Building Technique Group Co., Ltd. (Shihan Gao, and Litong Zheng)
© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi

From the architect. It is located in the south of the square of Benxi Museum. This building is both the local art gallery for cultural exhibiting purpose and the center for artists’ working and communication. The center contains 4 floors above ground and a basement floor. The interior space of the first and basement floor joining the exterior through the sunken yard, generates an individual and welcoming shared space for art exhibiting. The second, third and fourth floor are mainly used for working, art creating and meeting. The hovering and stagger public staircase connects each floor, while showing its multiple forms from basement to top.

© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi

© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi

The roof applies the doubled lean-to structure which emphasizes the “uptrend” form, enriches surrounding buildings’ flat roof outline around the Museum Square. Appealing to the trapezoid shape of the site, one right angle corner of the rectangular proto form of the building is cut to create obtuse corners. The “uptrend” roof working with the obtuse corners and the inclined entry staircase, generates a kind of newly appeared artistic urban vitality. What’s more, the cavities which is carved on the building’s stonelike facades, is created for people’s needs to rest in a grey space and conveys the persistent and moderate power which go through multiple layers which contain different forms and orientations.

© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi
Public Circulation Diagram Public Circulation Diagram
© Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi
Author: 罗靖琳
Posted: October 23, 2017, 12:00 am

From the architects: Urban development has many environmental implications: the consequences of people’s alienation from nature, the majority of Vietnamese people living down the narrow or crowded streets, and the ever increasing number of vehicles.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki
  • Architects: ALPES GDB
  • Location: Khuê Trung, Vietnam
  • Principal Architect: Ho Khue
  • Area: 700.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

From the architect. From the architects: Urban development has many environmental implications: the consequences of people’s alienation from nature, the majority of Vietnamese people living down the narrow or crowded streets, and the ever increasing number of vehicles.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

The mission of Ho Khue Architects (ALPES Green Design & Build) Office is reconnecting people and nature. Changing their environment with innovative and healthy designs changes their perspective and improves their living conditions and lives. S house is one of the works contributing to that mission.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

The “S” House is located in a new residential area in the Danang City Center, Vietnam.  There is a lot of traffic and noise however is a very convenient location.   Thus we have a good location that has some environmental problems for quality living.  In addition, all the buildings are the same architecture, not interesting or energy efficient.

Diagram Diagram

An innovative application of onsite precast concrete sheets for the exterior facade accomplished both saving money and time during construction.  These decorative sheets combined with long vertical windows and adjacent plantings of vining plants reducing the noise and pollution entering the residence.  The result was a beautiful and unique house that was protected from the large road used by many trucks.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

The house is horizontal like other urban houses.  It also goes back from the street 35 meters.  Allowing light to the center and providing ventilation to all areas of the building was a major concern. This was solved by creating a center zone of hanging gardens consisting of these Five Elements: Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Mercury, and “Metal”.  This is reminiscent of the old houses in Hoi An Ancient Town.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki

All of the family's activity and space is centered around and adjoins the central plantings and hanging garden such as: reception, dining, fitness, chatting, reading, and resting.  This Open Central Area effectively allows the maximum amount of natural light and air for all rooms.   It is a very effective way to establish green trees and plantings along the walls.  Natural rain is allowed to provide water and natural air to this central core for a cooler environment and humidity that plants need to thrive.

Section Section

A really enjoyable and multi-use area is the "family sky park", where kids can run around in the green grass and cool air.  A small corner of the park is a fragrant garden or vegetables for dinner. Space for childhood memories prior to urbanization.  There is room for recreation, relaxing, barbeques, and enjoying the cool night air and sky.  This rooftop green area provides cooling for the house plus recreational choices.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki
Author: Rayen Sagredo
Posted: October 22, 2017, 8:00 pm

With the objective of developing new solutions to the societal challenges of tomorrow, the RISING Architecture Week 2017—held in Aarhus, Denmark, between the 11th and 15th of September—consisted of a series of events, exhibitions, and the RISING Exchange Conference, focuses on how architecture and construction can help to rethink existing paradigms.

With the objective of developing new solutions to the societal challenges of tomorrow, the RISING Architecture Week 2017—held in Aarhus, Denmark, between the 11th and 15th of September—consisted of a series of events, exhibitions, and the RISING Exchange Conference, focuses on how architecture and construction can help to rethink existing paradigms.

We had the opportunity to visit the city and to talk with Jan Gehl, Pauline Marchetti, Ruth Baumeister, Daan Roosegaarde, John Thackara, Jacques Ferrier, Stephan Petermann, and Shajay Bhooshan, some of the speakers who contributed their visions on these issues. Thinking about a future in which different actors will be relevant in the process of addressing such challenges, we took the opportunity to make them question themselves: Are architects really needed?

Every time you put any brick down anywhere, you manipulate the quality of life of people. (...) If you just make form, it's sculpture. But it becomes architecture if the interaction between form and life is successful.
– Jan Gehl.

Check all their answers in the video above, and see some pictures of their lectures in the Official Facebook of the event.

The interviews were filmed and edited by Julie Due Steffensen and conducted by ArchDaily's Content Editor José Tomás Franco. The RISING Architecture Week will be held again in September 2019; find out all its details here.

Author: José Tomás Franco
Posted: October 22, 2017, 4:00 pm